Currently viewing the category: "Scorpions, Whipscorpions and Vinegaroons"
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Caribbean Insect
Found this monster in our Cistern Tank room last night. The piece of PVC pipe next to it is 8" long and 3" in diameter. I’ve had tarantulas crawl on me and scorpions sting me in bed, but never have I seen anything here on St. John this big. Can you identify it? No one around here has ever seen one before.
Thanks,
Debbie Grammer
St. John, US Virgin Islands

Hi Debbie,
Tailless Whipscorpions are Arachnids, not insects. Even though they are large and fierce looking, they are shy and harmless.

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Mexican Amblypygi
Greetings.
I believe this to be an arachnid Amblypygi but have not been able to find one on the web that is this large or colourful. It was discovered in a kitchen sink on Mexico’s Pacific coast just north of Manzanillo. Contrary to what I’ve read on the web, our Mexican friends attributed paralyzing bites to this insect. Can you give me a bit more information? Also, in trying to identify this insect I’ve noticed whip-scorpion and whip-spider being used – are they they same insect.
Thanks,
Ralph

Hi Ralph,
We have never seen a Tailless Whipscorpion quite like your beauty. When we were in Mexico for a solar eclipse, the locals warned us to stay indoors during totality since scorpions would fall from the sky. There are many unfounded superstitions about many creatures. We have only ever heard that Tailless Whipscorpions possess no venom, hence are harmless. Thank you for the wonderful image. Our Audubon Guide says there are 60 species worldwide and three in North America. Mexico has so many insects, spiders and related Arthropods that this could well be an undescribed species.

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Vinagrillo?
We saw this spider in mexico when we were checking out some of the ruins. It was about 3 and 1/2" accross. Could you tell us what it is? and is it dangerous? Thanks.

The Tailless Whipscorpion is harmless.

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what’s the name of that thing!
HI, I FOUND THIS STRANGE BUG OR INSECT AND DON’T HAVE A CLUE WHAT IT IS,PLEASE HELP ME FIND OUT ITS NAME AND WHAT CLASS OF INSECT OR BUG IT IS.THIS BUG OR INSECT WAS FOUND BY MYSELF HERE IN GRENADA.
THANK YOU.
DILLON JOHNSON

Hi Dillon,
The Tailless Whipscorpion belongs to the Order Amblypygi. Despite the fierce appearance, they are harmless and actually quite shy nocturnal hunters.

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Scorpion Pictures
we found this scorpion yesterday here at work. We get alot of stuff from Asia, but not tropical regions. We are in Chicago Illinois, so I know that this would die here right? Do you know what this one is or where it would come from? Is he venemous? Anything would be nice, cuz right now we have him in a tupperware container with a hole in the top not knowing what to do with him…did someone plant him as a joke, or is he really from Asia? He is about 3 – 4 inches long….totally black from what I can see….hope you can determine something from this…
Heidi

Hi Heidi,
This is most assuredly not a Chicago native. We believe this to be an African Black Scorpion in the genus Pandinus. We found this information on a scorpion collector’s website: “African Emperor Scorpion (Pandinus imperator) WC adults 4″, $15 each These beautiful jet black scorpions are also, pound for pound one of the largest. Gentile in nature for the most part making them ideal pet specimans that rarely sting, and posseses mild venom. These have been a staple scorpion hobby species for many years, and a must for beginners looking for a great start in keeping scorpions. Very cool scorpion! ” In answer to your question about it being planted as a joke: WE THINK SO.

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Big bug in garage
Hi Bugman:
I live in Phoenix, and when I went to grab the dust-buster the other night, I nearly wound up with a handful of heart attack. Can you identify this beast? Or at least which planet it came from? I also found one at the bottom of my pool a couple weeks ago.
Thanks,
John

Hi John,
Despite the warning sign which gives us endless amusement, the Tailless Whipscorpion is harmless. It is a shy desert dweller often found in dark damp areas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination