Currently viewing the category: "Scorpions, Whipscorpions and Vinegaroons"
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Subject: Vinegaroon with better eyesight
Location: Doesn’t matter
January 10, 2016 10:42 am
Hello there.
I got a question for a very unusual reason. I’m currently writting a book were bugs of different kinds have a very large role.
Funny thing is that in this book the bugs will be both the heroes and the villains so it’s definitivly not about exterminating bugs.
Nothing like Starship Troopers or anything like that where bugs are massacred.
I’m looking for a type of vinegaroon with better eyesight. It doesn’t have to be fantastic, but it must be able to locate prey outside the range of it’s feeler antenna’s.
The size of the vinegaroon does not matter much. A picture and further information about this particular species of vinegaroon is very much appriciated.
Had to put some kind of picture in there so i just threw in whatever was closest to hand.
Yup. I’m seriously trying to become a writter which has been my ambition for more than half my life.
Signature: Regards Spleen the wannabe author

Giant Vinegaroon

Giant Vinegaroon from our archives

Dear Spleen,
Since you did not supply an image, we delved into our archives for an especially nice image of a Giant Vinegaroon taken by Susan in New Mexico.  Our suspicions proved correct when we read this BugGuide statement:  “The vinegaroon is nocturnal and has poor vision. The whiplike tail is used as a sensory organ, as is the first pair of legs, which is not used for walking. Although its tail in unable to sting, this creature can spray an acidic mist from a scent gland at the base of the tail when disturbed. The spray is 85% concentrated acetic acid/vinegar, hence the common name “Vinegaroon.” The heavy pinching mouthparts (modified pedipalps) can also inflict a painful bite. Although very unlikely to attack humans, it can certainly defend itself if provoked.”  Tailless Whipscorpions in the order Amblypygi are also nocturnal hunters, and we presume also with poor eyesight.  We cannot provide you with any information on Vinegaroons with good eyesight, so you should probably find a better protagonist for your book.  We would suggest a Wolf Spider, and if you really want it to be fierce, make it a female Wolf Spider defending her brood

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpion?
Location: Central Arizona
November 14, 2015 3:27 pm
Found on a wall after dusk. Have seen these several times.
Signature: Brian

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Brian,
This is not a true Scorpion, but as its common name implies, this Tailless Whipscorpion is classfied, along with Spiders and Scorpions, in the class Arachnida, but they are all divided up at the order level of taxonomy.  Unlike Spiders and Scorpions, Tailless Whipscorpions lack venom, so they are not considered dangerous to humans.  They do, however, possess powerful mandibles that they use to crush and chew prey, and if they are carelessly handled, a painful bite may result.  They are shy, nocturnal hunters that generally flee from humans if encountered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Harvestman?
Location: Glenmore, KZN
September 20, 2015 8:29 am
Good Day,
My parents found this bug in their garden shed in Glenmore, KZN. Does anybody know what bug this is?
Signature: Nielen

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Nielen,
This Tailless Whipscorpion in the Arachnid Order Amblypygi is a shy, nocturnal hunter that poses to threat to humans as Tailless Whipscorpions do not have venom.  They do have strong mandibles and might bite if carelessly handled, but they are more likely to scuttle away to avoid a confrontation.  Allowing it to live in the garden shed will help to reduce the numbers of roaches, spiders and other creatures that might pose a bigger threat to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: a pretty alright vinegaroon
Location: she’s a pet, so anywhere, but California native.
September 13, 2015 1:02 pm
Yo! Just submitting some pictures of vinegaroons, since they’re so cool and I didn’t see many pictures of them doing much but standing in the defensive posture. Here’s my girlie eating, carrying babies, and posing.
Signature: Vinegaroon Salad

Vinegaroon and Brood

Vinegaroon and Brood

Dear Vinegaroon Salad,
Thanks for sending in your images of your pet Vinegaroon and her brood.

Vinegaroon

Vinegaroon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: whipspiders!
Location: she’s a pet, so anywhere.
September 13, 2015 12:57 pm
I didn’t see very many pictures of Tanzanian giant whipspiders on the site, so I thought you might want some of one happily eating, one freshly molted and one intact molt. I’ve seen a lot of people get confused by the changed coloration between a molt, a freshly molted, and an average one. So, here you go!
Signature: Vinegaroon salad

Pet Whipscorpion

Pet Whipscorpion

Dear Vinegaroon salad,
Thank you for sending your images of your pet Tanzanian Giant Whipscorpion.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tailless Whipscorpion
Location: Mexican border with Guatemala
February 8, 2015 11:08 am
I took this picture on 1/29/2015, identified by the guide as a whip scorpion. But I think it might actually be a tailless whipscorpion, as it has no tail. The picture was taken with a flash inside a Maya ruin at Yaxchilan. I think that the flash has caused shadows so that the legs look “double”. Yaxchilan is on the Mexican side of the Usumacinta River – the border to Guatemala.
From another of your articles, it appears that this creature is from the order Amblypygi , but I was wondering if the species can be identified. “BUG GUIDE” is only for US & Canada, and this creature is Mexican/ Central American.
Signature: Thanks, Bob Williamson

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear  This Bob,
We don’t generally attempt to identify Tailless Whipscorpions beyond the order, but perhaps one of our readers will write in with more information.
  We did locate a pdf entitled LOS AMBLIPÍGIDOS O TENDARAPOS DE MÉXICO (ARACHNIDA: AMBLYPYGI) by Luis F. de Armas that contains the following information:  “The whip spiders or tailless whipscorpions of Mexico (Arachnida: Amblypygi)  Abstract: The Mexican fauna of whip spiders or tailless whipscorpions contains 20 species belonging to the genera Acantho- phrynus Kraepelin, 1899 (one species), Paraphrynus Moreno, 1940 (11 species) and Phrynus Lamarck, 1801 (8 species) (Phrynidae: Phryninae). Only five (25%) of these species are not Mexican endemics, whereas six Paraphrynus species are troglobites. Paraphrynus and Phrynus have 82% and 50% of endemic species, respectively. The highest specific richness and endemism are concentrated in the southeastern states (Chiapas, Oaxaca and Quintana Roo).”

Hey Daniel:
Thanks for the quick response.  As I look closer at my photo, I can see some banding on the legs, which I previously missed.  I know that the Amblypygi name ending in “Mexico” (which of course I cannot relocate on the web now that I want to again) did not look like this one, mainly because of the light brown and banded legs.  Maybe the flash is hiding that a little.
This was the first time I have seen one and because of the size, it is certainly scary looking.  I was surprised to find out it can neither bite nor sting humans.
Thanks for your help.
Later, This Bob.

Hi again This Bob,
Tailless Whipscorpions do not have venom and they do not have stingers, so they pose no threat to humans.  We thought we once read that a large specimen might bite, but according to BugGuide:  “No venom glands, and do not sting or bite. If disturbed, they scuttle sideways.”

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination