Currently viewing the category: "Scorpionflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

scorpion fly?
found in my garden today not flying very far at a time,on a very hot sunny day in north Norfolk england 27/7/2008 , i had never see anything like it before, then i came across your web site. so thats what it is? keep up the good work .add it to your picture list thanks
colin

hi Colin,
Your identification of a Scorpionfly is correct. Our only correction is in your spelling of the name. If the components scorpion and fly are separate, it implies a true fly in the order Diptera as opposed to the joining of the two words, similar to dragonfly or butterfly. Scorpionflies are in the order Mecoptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats this Bug?
Mr. Bugman,
Could you please identify this insect for me. I have been told it is a scorpian wasp but that is too obvious and I cannot find one on the internet. Also, I have several insect pictures posted at danesdigital.zenfolio.com listed under Danes Garage. I am posting pictures of all the little critters we find in and around our house here in East Texas. I noticed you also teach photography. Any feedback on my pictures would be appreciated as well. Thanks,
Dane Clark
Troup TX

Hi Dane,
This is a Scorpionfly, not a Scorpion Wasp. That might help you locate additional information. A Scorpionfly is neither a scorpion, nor a fly, but a member of the order Mecoptera (Scorpionflies, Hangingflies and Allies) and family Panorpidae. Adults feed on dead and dying insects, and occasionaly fruit. Check out BugGuide for more information. Your photo of the Scorpionfly is well exposed, in focus and reveals important anatomical features of the specimen. It would make a fine addition to our site as well as a fine illustration in a guide book. We would suggest higher resolution if you want to reproduce your images in print form.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Request of information
Hello,
could you help me: what kind of bug is it? I took this shot in the south of Italy, where I actualy live. Thanks for your help.
Ciao
Francesco

Hi Francesco,
This is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera. We are very happy to post your letter since we get very few requests from Italy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown must see sharp photo of unknown
I found this sitting on my bird feeder. I could not find him on your site. Can you help? Thanks,
JoLynn Self
Choctaw County, Oklahoma

Hi Jolynn,
This fascinating looking insect is a Scorpionfly. Scorpionflies are in the order Mecoptera and we have a page devoted to them. Adults feed on ripe fruit, dead insects and even bird droppings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

green winged flyer
Hi Bugman,
Hope your internet troubles are over! I’m trying to identify this green winged flyer found on the edge of the forest in New Hampshire. Any ideas? Thanks for the wonderful website!
Jennifer Carson

Hi Jennifer,
Your green winged flier is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

whats this bug/insect?
Need help identifying this insect/bug? Have never seen it before. we live in North Central Texas.
thanks in advance.
Susie
Cedar Hill, TX
(ps…that is a Zennia leaf it is attracted to)

Hi Susie,
What marvelous images of a Scorpionfly, genus Panorpa. These harmless insects feed on nectar, fruits and dying insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination