Currently viewing the category: "Solpugids and Camel Spiders"
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Subject:  Is this a spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lahore, Pakistan
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 07:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I just found this crawly in my house today and I have no idea what it is. Not even, if it’s a spider or not (can’t figure out what if its extremetimes is a leg and what is an antennae…) It is about 1 cm long and when I captured it under a glass, it kept on holding up its arms/ antennae in defiance, and curled up its tail part (similar to how a scorpion would do it).
Really would like to find out, what this is. Thank you and love from Pakistan.
How you want your letter signed:  Juju EA

Sun Spider: Solifugid

Dear Juju EA,
Though it is commonly called both a Sun Spider and a Wind Scorpion, this Solifugid is an Arachnid classified in the order Solifugae.  Unlike both Spiders and Scorpions, this Solifugid has no venom, nor is it poisonous, so except for a painful bite from a large individual like a Camel Spider, it does not pose a threat to humans.

Wind Scorpion: Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Tanzania
Date: 03/05/2018
Time: 09:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a camel spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Rebecca Jackson

Solifugid

Dear Rebecca,
Camel Spider is a common name used in the Middle East for a member of the order Solifugae.  Other common names are Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion, though Solifugids are neither true spiders or scorpions, nor are they venomous. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  i wish to know what bug this is
Geographic location of the bug:  new delhi, India
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 10:02 AM EDT
Hey there. I have seen this unusal bug for the first time today and i am quite intrigued by its behaviour. It behaves like a scorpion by raising its hind parts and usig the front two claw like things. I would like to know which species this bug is. Thank You for the help.
How you want your letter signed:  Revanth

Solifugid

Dear Revanth,
Commonly called a Sun Spider or a Wind Scorpion, this Solifugid is a non-venomous relative of both Spiders and Scorpions that is classified in the order Solifugae.  Your individual looks very different from North American Solifugids.  We found a similar looking individual from India, that is not identified beyond the order level, on the Animal Photo Album site.

Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large grey fuzzy bug
Location: Pecos, TX
August 5, 2017 6:22 pm
What is this? Seen in West Texas near Pecos around 8:30pm in August. Was hiding under some clothes on the ground. Looked like 2″-3″ long and I’m pretty sure it growled.
Signature: Susan

Solifugid

Dear Susan,
This is a non-venomous, predatory Arachnid known as a Solifugid, sometimes called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion.  Though like Spiders and Scorpions, it is classified as an Arachnid, unlike its relatives, the Solifugid has no venom, so it is harmless, though a large individual might bite if carelessly handled.  Considerably larger relatives in the Middle East are known as Camel Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Solifugid?
Location: -20.726218, 14.682127
June 5, 2017 7:11 am
We saw this spider- or scorpion-like animal at May, 4, 2017 in Damaraland, Namibia. It seems to be the same mentioned in this post https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2015/10/09/solifugid-or-windscorpion-from-kenya/ from 2015, although it has a slightly different colour (dark brown with more greyish hair). We saw it at early evening time (05:25 pm), it was about 3 to 5 cm long. Unfortunately the pictures are a bit dark and blurry (it moved pretty quick…)
It burried itself in the sand. For a better camouflage it took a blade of dry gras with it into the hole and covered itself.
We asked the guy from a local village who accopanied us if he knows what it is. He told us that it’s very rare but also poisonous. He actually took a step back when he saw it and told us that he got bitten once and had to go to the hospital.
It would be great to know more about this facinating little animal – i haven’t seen anything like that before.Mayby you got some more information on the species since the post from 2015?
Signature: Bettina

Possibly Teddy-Bear Solifugid

Dear Bettina,
Your images lack critical sharpness, and it is difficult for us to conclusively discern that this furry creature is a Solifugid.  It does seem to resemble the Teddy Bear Solifugids pictured on this Arthropod Ecology page where it states:  “Like most arachnids, solifugids don’t get much positive media attention. Famous on the internet by “forced perspective” photos makes them appear to be much larger and scarier than their modest 15cm maximum. There is even a photo of an intimidating, solifugid-like creature constructed by a talented invertebrate artist that has many fooled. As formidable as they look, they are likely non-venomous, with bites being rare and only resulting in localized pain and swelling in humans (Naskrecki, 2012).”  The site also states:  “Also known as mole solifugids, as soon as it sensed us, it buried itself beneath the sand and disappeared. A member of the family Hexisopodidae, it is characterized by adaptions to a mysterious subterranean lifestyle with fossorial 2nd, 3rd, and 4th legs, with the 4th lacking tarsal claws (Savary, 2009). Overall, not much is known about the life history of the Solifugid order other than some broad generalizations based on detailed observations of just a little more than a handful of different species.”  ISpot has some images of members of the family Hexisopodidae from Namibia.  We don’t know what to make of your guide’s claim that “he got bitten once and had to go to the hospital” but in 1991 when our editorial staff was in the mountains of Guerrero, Mexico to view the total solar eclipse, some locals told us to stay indoors because Scorpions would fall from the sky during the eclipse.

Possibly Teddy-Bear Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Don’t know if this bug is dangerous
Location: Burbank CA
May 2, 2017 8:13 am
Hi
I live in Southern California and found this big on my balcony. Would like to know what kind of spider it is and is it dangerous. I have a two year old son who likes to play on that balcony. I don’t want him or is for that matter to get bitten by dangerous spider.
Thanks
Signature: Andrew Warzocha

Solifugid

Dear Andrew,
This predatory Arachnid is a Solifugid, and it is commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion, but that should not be of any concern for you.  Though both Spiders and Scorpions are venomous, Solifugids do not.  They do have strong mandibles that are used to crush prey, and a large Solifugid might bite a person who carelessly handled it, but our North American Solifugids do not pose any threat to humans.  Solifugids from the Middle East are commonly called Camel Spiders.  They are considerably larger and a bite might cause some concern.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination