Currently viewing the category: "Solpugids and Camel Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Utah
Date: 09/03/2018
Time: 11:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have no idea what kind of bug this is we found in our living room last night
How you want your letter signed:  Ben

Solifugid

Dear Ben,
This beneficial, predatory Solifugid lacks venom, so it is no danger to humans nor pets, though a large individual with powerful mandibles might nip at any perceived threats.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this???
Geographic location of the bug:  South East Idaho
Date: 08/14/2018
Time: 03:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this crawling across our floor last night.  We have never seen this bug in our area. I’ve lived here 55 years.  Is it dangerous?  We have a baby crawling at home.
How you want your letter signed:  Freaked out Grandma

Solifugid

Dear Freaked out Grandma,
This is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion.  It is an Arachnid, but unlike Spiders and Scorpions, it lacks venom so it is harmless, though a large individual might deliver a painful bite.  Middle Eastern members of the order are much larger and are called Camel Spiders.  According to BugGuide, they are reported from Idaho and we have reports in our own archive of a Solifugid from Idaho.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird spider scorpion
Geographic location of the bug:  Niger
Date: 07/21/2018
Time: 03:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this on our aircraft and have been flying around central Africa.  This one we’ve never seen before and are interested in finding out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Chelsea

Solifugid

Dear Chelsea,
This is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or a Wind Scorpion, though it is neither a Spider nor a Scorpion.  It is an Arachnid, and unlike its venomous relatives, Spiders and Scorpions, the Solifugids do not have venom nor poison.  They do have powerful mandibles and a large individual might inflict a painful bite.  Large Solifugids in the Middle East are commonly called Camel Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Potato bug with pinchers?
Geographic location of the bug:  California, santa barbara
Date: 06/21/2018
Time: 01:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman!
We’ve been seeing these bugs around the house. Like a cross between a scorpion and a potato bug. Not slow and sluggish like a PB, it has pinchers and goes into attack mode if you come near.
Should we be afraid?  Are bugs cross breeding now?
Thanks for your help in IDing these “buggers”.
How you want your letter signed:  Deligrrl

Wind Scorpion

Dear Deligrrl,
This is a Solifugid, an Arachnid in the order Solifugae, and your observation that it resembles a Scorpion is due to both being classified as Arachnids.  Solifugids do resemble Potato Bugs.  Solifugids are commonly called Sun Spiders or Wind Scorpions, though they are truly neither.  Additionally, though Spiders and Scorpions are both venomous, Solifugids have no venom and they pose no threat to humans.  They are fierce predators that will eat, tearing apart their prey with their strong mandibles, most anything up to and possible even larger than their own size.  Middle Eastern Solifugids are much larger in size and they are commonly called Camel Spiders.

Oh my goodness that was fast!
Thank you so much for your help identifying this bug which is a spider.  Maybe it’s trying to eat the mice we keep catching in our car port!  We’ve lived here for 20 years and they only just started showing up.
Thanks again, and have a great weekend.

You are welcome, but you misunderstood.  Solifugids are Arachnids, but they are neither Scorpions nor Spiders.  They are classified in a different order.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lahore, Pakistan
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 07:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I just found this crawly in my house today and I have no idea what it is. Not even, if it’s a spider or not (can’t figure out what if its extremetimes is a leg and what is an antennae…) It is about 1 cm long and when I captured it under a glass, it kept on holding up its arms/ antennae in defiance, and curled up its tail part (similar to how a scorpion would do it).
Really would like to find out, what this is. Thank you and love from Pakistan.
How you want your letter signed:  Juju EA

Sun Spider: Solifugid

Dear Juju EA,
Though it is commonly called both a Sun Spider and a Wind Scorpion, this Solifugid is an Arachnid classified in the order Solifugae.  Unlike both Spiders and Scorpions, this Solifugid has no venom, nor is it poisonous, so except for a painful bite from a large individual like a Camel Spider, it does not pose a threat to humans.

Wind Scorpion: Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Tanzania
Date: 03/05/2018
Time: 09:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a camel spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Rebecca Jackson

Solifugid

Dear Rebecca,
Camel Spider is a common name used in the Middle East for a member of the order Solifugae.  Other common names are Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion, though Solifugids are neither true spiders or scorpions, nor are they venomous. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination