Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Look what I found patrolling my Woody Plant
Geographic location of bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  9/1/2017
Time:  11:32 PM
Dear Bugman,
From searching your website, I believe this is a California Mantis.  Can you confirm?
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Female California Mantis

Dear Constant Gardener,
You are correct that this is a California Mantis, and the short wings indicate that it is a mature female California Mantis.  Congratulations on having such a good security system to protect your plants from critters that might want to eat them.

Female California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what is this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  chicagoland – suburban area
Date: 08/30/2017
Time: 08:15 AM EDT
about 5″ long. looked to be able to fly.
How you want your letter signed:  jim

Male Chinese Mantis

Hi Jim,
This looks to us like a male Chinese Mantis, a species now naturalized in many parts of North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Chinese Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilmette Illinois
August 28, 2017 7:57 AM
I believe this to be a Chinese Mantis. I thought he was quite photogenic.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin Weidman

Immature Chinese Mantis

Dear Karin,
This Mantis is immature and identification of immature individuals is often more difficult than the identification of mature adults.  The wing pads do appear to have a green edge, so we believe your identification of an immature Chinese Mantis is correct.

Immature Chinese Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect clinging to the side of my house
Geographic location of the bug:  Lakewood, WA
August 28, 2017 4:40 PM
Never saw one like this before. It’s been clinging to the side of my house for 3 hrs now. It is 2.5″ long.
How you want your letter signed:  Beate Otto

Male European Mantis

Dear Beate Otto,
Based on this BugGuide image, we are confident this is a male European Mantis.  According to BugGuide:  “Widespread in the United States and in southeastern and southwestern Canada, but often not as common in hot humid or very dry climates as elsewhere. Generally not found in desert regions except in agricultural, urban, or otherwise artificially watered environments. Perhaps(?) not able to overwinter in north-central US and south-central Canada. It can be expected almost anywhere, because it is often sold as egg cases for pest control in gardens, even in places where it cannot survive long term.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Praying Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  south eastern IL
August 27, 2017 9:36 AM
Your letter to the bugman:  I am wondering what species of mantis this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Female Carolina Mantis

This looks to us like a female Carolina Mantis, Stagmomantis carolina, when compared to this BugGuide image.  The wings of the female fall short of the tip of the abdomen.  Despite its name, the Carolina Mantis has a range that extends over much of the eastern U.S., as BugGuide date indicates.  The native Carolina Mantis is much smaller than Mantid species that have been introduced, and they often fall prey to larger Chinese Mantids and European Mantids.

Female California Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unicorn Mantis
Location: Southern AZ (Santa Cruz county)
August 22, 2017 10:35 am
We have one of these rare mantis, shown here ready to catch flies.
See photo
I was told in was an AZ Unicorn Mantis and the first one our resident expert has seen here. I see you already have it listed in WTB as an Mexican Unicorn Mantis… I suppose this is the same. Nevertheless you can note this mantis is also in our region for the files.
Amazing to watch it catch flies.
Signature: Len Nowak ( Salero Ranch )

Arizona Unicorn Mantis

Dear Len,
You have been sending in some wonderful images to our site.  Your immature Arizona Unicorn Mantis does look very similar to this individual posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the range is “In United States: south-central to southeastern Arizona” and the site also states “Mexican Unicorn Mantis, Phyllovates chlorophaea, though ranges apparently do not overlap in United States.”  That link leads one elsewhere on BugGuide to the Texas Unicorn Mantis page, so that species must be synonymous with the Mexican Unicorn Mantis.  Thanks for bringing our attention to the posting on our site of the Mexican Unicorn Mantis from 2008.  We suspect the two genera were observed after we created that link nine years ago.  We will update that posting based on the new information we have learned thanks to your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination