Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Praying Mantis
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
October 2, 2017
2:38 PM
Hi Daniel,
I found a desiccated praying mantis caught in a thick spider web.  Must have been sticky… aren’t they strong enough to pull themselves out of a web?
Great Autumn day, my favorite time of the year.
Monique

Mantis Exuvia

Hi Monique,
Look more closely at your image.  See the split down the back and empty shell?  This is an exuvia, the shed exoskeleton of a Preying Mantis.  Somewhere in your garden, there is probably an adult Preying Mantis.  This is the time of year they are maturing, mating and laying eggs in an ootheca in preparation for the start of a new generation next spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp eating Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Dayton, Ohio
Date: 09/29/2017
Time: 07:10 PM EDT
This mantis has been hanging out on our flag pole for the last 2 days. He is alive, but has been letting a wasp land on his tail for long periods at a time. Now the mantis’s tail is chewed up and half gone. Why would the mantis let the wasp do that?
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Mantis

Dear Mike,
We wish you could provide an image of the Wasp.  Generally, when wasps prey upon other insects, it is to feed their young.  We have not heard of a situation where a wasp returns to its prey repeatedly without killing it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Elounda, Crete, Greece
Date: 09/27/2017
Time: 05:02 AM EDT
Staying in Elounda and this jumped in front of us on to a wall at night, it seemed attracted to the light on the wall.  Saw this and thought at first it might be a grasshopper but unsure?  Then saw this lovely green insect… Any clues please?
How you want your letter signed:  Sue S

Mantis

Dear Sue,
This is a Mantis and we believe it is likely a male Mediterranean Mantis,
Iris oratoria, a species that has been introduced to other parts of the world including North America as this BugGuide image demonstrates.  Your other insect is a Stink Bug.

Dear Daniel
Thank you so very much for your fabulous, speedy response.
Really appreciate your suggestions.
Thanks a lot
Sue 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Three Male California Mantids
Geographic Location of the Bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  September 16, 2016
Time:  10:38 AM EDT
Saturday morning, after posting identification requests from our readership, Daniel discovered three male California Mantids in various places in the yard.  Earlier in the season, several female California Mantids were observed over time.  Daniel knows for certain there are at least three mature females in the garden now, and they are probably releasing pheromones as it is time to mate and lay eggs.  One could only hope that each female attracted her own suitor.

First Male California Mantis on the Hungarian wax pepper plant.

Male California Mantids can be distinguished from female California Mantids because males are smaller, thinner and have longer wings.  Unlike the wings of the males, the wings of the females do not reach the end of the abdomen.  Both male and female California Mantids can be brown or green.

Second male California Mantis on the screen door.

Third male California Mantis on the porch light.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis patrolling my Woody Plant captures marauding Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  09/09/2017
Time:  10:37 AM EDT
Dear Bugman,
Last week I sent you pictures of the female California Mantis that is patrolling my Woody Plant.  Well, today I am happy to report that she is doing her job.  I found her eating this large green grasshopper.  I wish I could have seen the actual capture, but I didn’t arrive until after the Grasshopper had its head eaten away.  Much earlier in the summer, I removed some small green Grasshoppers that you identified as a Gray Bird Grasshopper, a funny name since it was green.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Female California Mantis eats Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
The prey in your image is indeed a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, and it is much larger than the individual in your submission from early July of a Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph.  The reason these green nymphs are called Gray Bird Grasshoppers is because that is the color of the mature adult.  Nymphs feeding on fresh green leaves need to blend in or they will be eaten.  Your female California Mantis is beautifully camouflaged among the leaves of your plant, especially when she is downwardly hanging.

Thanks Bugman,
Do you have any further advice regarding caring for my guard insect?

Hi again Constant Gardener,
If a mature, mated California Mantis finds a safe plant where the hunting is good, she will remain there.  She will eventually produce and attach to woody stems, several oothecae, the egg cases that each contain dozens of eggs that will hatch into mantidlings in the spring.  When you harvest, keep a diligent eye peeled for the oothecae.  In our own garden, we tie the oothecae we discover while pruning in the fall and winter onto trees and shrubs where we would like to have predators that keep injurious species at bay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Look what I found patrolling my Woody Plant
Geographic location of bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  9/1/2017
Time:  11:32 PM
Dear Bugman,
From searching your website, I believe this is a California Mantis.  Can you confirm?
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Female California Mantis

Dear Constant Gardener,
You are correct that this is a California Mantis, and the short wings indicate that it is a mature female California Mantis.  Congratulations on having such a good security system to protect your plants from critters that might want to eat them.

Female California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination