Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect
Location: Delray Beach, Florida
January 15, 2017 8:57 pm
Dear Bugman:
This insect was found on my front brick walkway close to the yard and to flower bed. It is about 1.5 inches in length and is very well camouflaged. I live in Delray Beach, Florida which is southeast Florida.
Signature: Sally Sperry

Grizzled Mantis

Dear Sally,
The Grizzled Mantis or Florida Bark Mantid is quite difficult to spot when it rests on tree bark.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon Identification
Location: Tecumseh, MI
January 1, 2017 12:22 pm
I have found three cocoons of a type, which I have never seen before in my yard. I raise butterflies and moths and am familiar with the cocoons of species which I usually see in my yard. I have included a picture of two of the cocoons. All of them were on plants on the South side of my house. One was on a rose bush, another on a Ninebark bush – both of these were out in the open. The third was buried in some Gaillardia which had died back for the Winter. These would have been formed very late in the Fall – probably in November. In the picture the front of the cocoon is pictured on the left. You can see the shape and that it has ridges from top to bottom, which go all the way around. The right side of the picture shows how the cocoon is attached to the plant. Just one small strip at the top holds it on. The bottom of the cocoon is a very light tan and also has ridges. The texture is almost like styrofoam. I live in Southeast lower Michigan Latitude/Longitude 42.0039, -83.9449. If this is something I have never seen, I would like to over winter the cocoons in my garage. Thank you for any information, which you can give me.
Signature: Jan Graves

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jan,
This is not a cocoon.  It is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis and come spring, several hundred hatchlings should emerge.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for your prompt reply. The links which you supplied definitely depict what I found.  I will leave them where they are and hope that I am  lucky enough to see some of the little Preying Mantis when they emerge.
Jan Graves

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Bug?
Location: Florida
December 7, 2016 2:24 pm
I found this outside my front door this morning. Its December 7th and we live near Tampa Florida. Its been unusually warm this past week although we getting a child front in tomorrow. When I got home from work it was still in the same place. I don’t know if its some type of mantis or beetle? I looked through over 300 pictures to find what it was but couldn’t find it. I would love your help. Thank you!
Signature: Olga

Grizzled Mantis

Grizzled Mantis

Dear Olga,
Though your image is lacking in critical clarity, it inarguably represents a Grizzled Mantis or Florida Bark Mantis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Florida Bark Mantis
Location: Naples, FL
December 2, 2016 8:11 pm
Hello!
This little guy below has been hanging out on my lanai screen for at least 12 hours. I can’t find much information on the florida bark mantis but we are thinking this is what it is? Should I do anything for it or just leave it be?
Signature: Courtney Fosnight

Grizzled Mantis

Grizzled Mantis

Dear Courtney,
You are correct that this is a Florida Bark Mantis or Grizzled Mantis, and she is a female.  According to BugGuide:  “May be found in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. May also be found in Puerto Rico and Cuba .”  In our opinion, you should leave her be.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hammer head insect
Location: Cyprus
October 10, 2016 2:08 am
Can you please identify this bug?
Signature: Pete Hussey

Preying Mantis

Preying Mantis

Dear Pete,
The simple answer to your question is that this is a Mantis, and she is a female.  We thought it might be easy to identify her to the species level, but we have our doubts.  She is NOT
Sphodromantis viridis, a species pictured on the Biodiversity of Cyprus site, because she lacks the characteristic white spot on her wings.  Three species of Mantis are pictured on the Cyprus Insects and Reptiles site, but the only species that looks close is the Mediterranean Mantis,  Iris oratoria.  Your individual has mottled wings, unlike the images of the Mediterranean Mantis we located on BugGuide (because it was introduced to North America) or on ZipCodeZoo.  A very similar looking Mantis is pictured on the Yorkshire Field Herping and Wildlife Photography site in a 2014 Cyprus posting, but it is identified only as “Mantis Spp.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Two Male California Mantids at the WTB? office
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 8, 2016 10:37 AM
We found so many immature California Mantids in our primrose patch this spring and summer after we found several oothecae while pruning last year, so we are thrilled to have gotten a visit from two adult winged males this morning.  This is not the first time they have been attracted to the porch light. Hopefully there are some female California Mantids lurking, well camouflaged, in our garden.

Male California Mantid (shot through window)

Male California Mantid (shot through window)

Male California Mantid

Male California Mantid

The other male California Mantid

The other male California Mantid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination