Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug on a lichen
Geographic location of the bug:  Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk, Naples FL
Date: 02/01/2019
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 inch big, just attached to the lichen. I found this about 11 a.m, and it was still there when I came back probably about 1 hr. later, and it showed no signs of life. I’m sure I was the only one who ever saw this, and I did show it to a family.
How you want your letter signed:  Sylvia

Lichen Mimic Mantid

WOW Sylvia,
We have no shortage of images of Lichen Mimic Mantids or Grizzled Mantids on our site and there are even a few that show them perfectly camouflaged against bark or lichens, but we have never seen a Lichen Mimic Mantid image more impressive than yours, not the least characteristic of which is the white color of the Mantid.  This is the whitest individual we could locate on BugGuide and it appears about a zone darker than the individual in your image.  We have never had the pleasure of observing Lichen Mimic Mantids in nature, but our own experience with California Mantids leads us to believe she is going to stay on that white patch where she blends in perfectly.  Like the California Mantis female, the Lichen Mimic Mantid female is flightless, and both are much more likely to remain in the same place if the hunting is good while the winged male is much more mobile, a good attribute since the male seeks out the female.  Though we already selected a Bug of the Month February 2019, since your submission arrived on the first of the month, we have no problem designating it as Bug of the Month February 2019 as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantis Ootheca and adult, female California Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 10/08/2018
Time: 5:30 PM PDT
We have a long overdue update on our She’s a Man-Eater posting.  Several days after the mating and cannibalistic meal that followed on our porchlight, Daniel relocated the female California Mantis in the genus
Stagmomantis (not sure if species is S. californica or S. limbata as both species are reported from Los Angeles) to the plum trees in back, and after a day, we could no longer find her, but we did locate this ootheca in the branches not far from where we released her.

Mantis Ootheca

Then we found a female Mantis nearby, but we cannot say for certain she is the same individual.  Now that January has arrived, the ootheca is still in place and it has still not hatched.

Female California Mantis

Female California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Saint Augustine, Fl
Date: 01/03/2019
Time: 05:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help us figure out what kind of bug this is!
How you want your letter signed:  St A Crew

Grizzled Mantis

Dear St A Crew,
This is a Grizzled Mantis or Florida Bark Mantis,
Gonatista grisea, a native predator that is nearly impossible to find when it is resting camouflaged on the trunk of a tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Mallorca
Date: 10/17/2018
Time: 05:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this giant bug on the window of our flat and we just don’t know what it is! Please help!
How you want your letter signed:  Daniel Jones

Mantis

Dear Daniel,
This is a predatory male Mantis.  Most sources call them Praying Mantids, but we prefer the more secular name Preying Mantids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Looks like a preying mantis but it’s colorful?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bucks county, PA
Date: 09/28/2018
Time: 11:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this bug on my wood door frame. It was highly camouflaged. When I looked back it had all these colors. I couldn’t find one similar to it online and I’m so curious!
How you want your letter signed:  Shannon G

Female Carolina Mantis

Dear Shannon,
Based on the markings on the wings, we strongly suspect that this is a female Carolina Mantis,
Stagmomantis carolina, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Your image with her wings displayed are a wonderful addition, and we verified with this BugGuide image that the colorful flight wings she has are consistent with the color and markings for the species.  According to BugGuide:  “Mantids are most commonly seen in late summer and early fall. August-frost (eastern North Carolina).”

Female California Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating California Mantids at our porch light
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/28/2018
Time: 11:30 PM PDT
Daniel was up late sitting in the kitchen when a large Walnut Underwing caused him to go outside with the camera.  There has been a female California Mantid at the porch light for a few weeks now, and she has been getting fat eating moths and other insects that are attracted to the light.  Well, seems she attracted a mate, and true to her expected behavior, she bit off his head to ensure their coupling would be successful.  The next morning, the corpse was gone.  Did she finish her meal as a post-coital snack?  The female California Mantid living at the porch light last season was not so lucky.  Daniel is thinking of moving her to the plum trees where she will have numerous choices where to lay her oothecae.

Mating California Mantids

Update:  September 29, 2018
Daniel did move the Mantis to the plum trees with the hope she will lay her oothecae there.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination