Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Looking for love in Los Angeles
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 02:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was visiting a dear friend in Mount Washington and spotted this male praying mantis perched on a woody plant.
It appears he is searching for a female.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Male California Mantis

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
We agree that this is a male Mantis and that he is likely patrolling for a mate.  This is a California Mantis, a native species in the genus
Stagmomantis. Last year Daniel documented the mating of a pair of California Mantids that ended with him becoming a sacrificial meal to help nourish the female who promptly bit off the head of her paramour.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Praying mantis (patreon)
Geographic location of the bug:  Lewis Center OH
Date: 09/12/2019
Time: 10:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen such a pale colored mantis.  I supposed it molted recently?  It looks opalescent, so beautiful!  I found it trapped in the vestibule of the Tim Hortons.
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer Huffman

Female Carolina Mantis

Dear Jennifer,
This is an adult female Carolina Mantis.  Though she has wings, she is not capable of flight.  Only the adult males can fly.  Carolina Mantids can be either brown or green, and sometimes a combination.  Though this individual is light, the color does not seem unusually light to us.  Because of your kindness prompting you to release this Carolina Mantis from the vestibule where you found her trapped, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What an honor!  I’d like to take this opportunity to thank my husband, who patiently waits for me to inspect and photograph bugs everywhere we go.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mantis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 05/17/2019
Time: 06:32 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
My Cannabis sprouts are growing, and I just found this tiny Mantis on one of the plants.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Mantis hatchling

Dear Constant Gardener,
We appreciate your first submission of 2019 and we eagerly await more documentation of the insects associated with your 2019 crop.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Praying Mantis idenrification
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama Oeste, Panama in the mountsins
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 03:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please, I saw this praying mantis in the hills of west panama near campana national park. I was a peace corps volunteer there and go back often. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Rachel Calmas

Dead Leaf Mantis

Dear Rachel,
That bright pink abdomen is surely distinctive, and it greatly contrasts the dried leaf camouflage that this Mantis sports.  We quickly located images of a Dead Leaf Mantis,
Acanthops falcata, on Alamy, but alas, the image does not show the pink abdomen.  This image on Photo Net beautifully illustrates the pink coloration on the abdomen.

Dead Leaf Mantis

Yes! That’s the mantis. You were not able to identify what specific type?
Thank you for trying.
Warmly,
Rachel
Hi again Rachel,
We don’t understand your response.  What is nonspecific about the species name Acanthops falcata?  How much more specific would you like us to get? 
Hi Daniel,
Thank you! I apologize that I misread you original email. When you said the image on Almay did not show the pink abdomen I thought you were stating it was not a match. I’m delighted to know species name. It is a beautiful mantis.
With much appreciation,
Rachel
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sinai Egypt
Date: 03/30/2019
Time: 06:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help Id this insect
How you want your letter signed:  James

Desert Pebble Mantis

Dear James,
We believe we have correctly identified your Mantis as a Desert Pebble Mantis,
Eremiaphila zetterstedti. The Desert Pebble Mantis is also pictured on FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug on a lichen
Geographic location of the bug:  Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk, Naples FL
Date: 02/01/2019
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 inch big, just attached to the lichen. I found this about 11 a.m, and it was still there when I came back probably about 1 hr. later, and it showed no signs of life. I’m sure I was the only one who ever saw this, and I did show it to a family.
How you want your letter signed:  Sylvia

Lichen Mimic Mantid

WOW Sylvia,
We have no shortage of images of Lichen Mimic Mantids or Grizzled Mantids on our site and there are even a few that show them perfectly camouflaged against bark or lichens, but we have never seen a Lichen Mimic Mantid image more impressive than yours, not the least characteristic of which is the white color of the Mantid.  This is the whitest individual we could locate on BugGuide and it appears about a zone darker than the individual in your image.  We have never had the pleasure of observing Lichen Mimic Mantids in nature, but our own experience with California Mantids leads us to believe she is going to stay on that white patch where she blends in perfectly.  Like the California Mantis female, the Lichen Mimic Mantid female is flightless, and both are much more likely to remain in the same place if the hunting is good while the winged male is much more mobile, a good attribute since the male seeks out the female.  Though we already selected a Bug of the Month February 2019, since your submission arrived on the first of the month, we have no problem designating it as Bug of the Month February 2019 as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination