Currently viewing the category: "Opiliones and Harvestmen"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wings or no?
June 2, 2009
I came across this guy in my kitchen and immediately snapped a picture of it. I then got it in a jar and released it outdoors. The wing-like tentacles on its back moved around almost like an octopus. I’ve never seen an insect like this.
Curious Dude
Western NC USA

Molting Harvestman we believe

Molting Harvestman we believe

Dear Curious Dude,
Those are not wings, and this is a Harvestman in the order Opiliones, but we need to seek advice on what is actually happening in this photo.  We believe you have photographed the molting process, but we need confirmation on that.  Harvestmen are sometimes called Daddy Long Legs.

Update from Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
The harvestman looks like it has succumbed to a fungal attack.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Long legged spider / insect ???
Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 5:27 AM
Dear Bugman
This creature is currently basking in the sun on the front of my new house wall. Location is central Scotland. Its legs are very long and almost create a fan shape. Its body is oval with a bit of hight to it and its legs resemble spider esk shape. We have fir trees at the back of the garden and I thought it might have come from there. I would really love to know what it is and if im likely to see more of them in the future.
Mrs Brind
Falkirk

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear Mrs Brind,
We searched through 19 pages of images of Harvestmen in the order Opiliones in the hope of finding an example of an individual positioned like yours, but we were not successful. Harvestmen are related to spiders, but do not possess venom. They are harmless scavengers that are sometimes called Daddy Long Legs.

Hi Bugman and Mrs. Brind:
This looks like Dicranopalpus ramosus. Although harvestmen are quite harmless in a direct sense (to humans), this is apparently an exotic or ‘invasive’ species in Europe, so there may be some ecological implications. Apparently it originated in North Africa and has been spreading northward for some time, finally reaching Scotland in 2000. Because in is an invasive species there are quite a number of articles and photos on the internet. Wikipedia offers a brief summary at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dicranopalpus_ramosus Regards.
Karl

Hi Karl,
We were unable to open the Wikipedia page you cited, but we did find another website with good images of Dicranopalpus ramosus and we found a posting entitled UK Alien Invasion on the UK Independant website.
Gradual species expansion like this is an often overlooked symptom of Global Warming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Harvestman
Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 3:58 AM
Hi, I was just reading about the Harvesman which Pauline found in the Falkland Islands. I found some in my garden in Stanley yesterday, they are quite abundant, and I know I have found them before, also on outer Islands I Have found them, they seem to be widespread. Also there seems to be a couple of varieties, the back can be different, plain or fancy, the picture i have here you can see the pattern on the back of it. They look very similar to the ones found in Chile. This is just a follow up, I thought you might like to see it a little closer for identifying purposes.
Best Regards,
Zachary Stephenson.
Falkland Islands, Stanley

Harvestman from Falkland Islands

Harvestman from Falkland Islands

Dear Zachary,
Thanks for sending us your photos of this unusual looking Harvestman. It is much more frightening looking than the typical North American Daddy Long Legs. Whether they are scary looking or not, Harvestman or Opiliones are harmless scavengers without venom.

Harvestman from Falkland Islands

Harvestman from Falkland Islands

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Grandaddy Longlegs
Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 6:23 AM
Dear Bug Guy, I know that this bug is probably very familiar to everyone, we called it the grandaddy long legs. There was a rumor growing up that if they could bite they would kill you, I never knew if that was true or not, but I never let one get close enough to bite. I saw this particular grandaddy on some wood we were putting away and noticed the little red things on it. Are they eggs, baby grandaddy’s or some other bug hitching a ride. I think their legs look like spark plug wires, I have never seen them this close. So, since we all know what we call these, what is their real name, and what are the little red things attached to it.
Thnaks so much,
Lisa Benningfield
Eastern Kentucky USA

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Hi Lisa,
This is a Harvestman in the order Opiliones.  They are often called Daddy Long Legs and they are harmless scavengers without venom.  The red creatures are Parasitic Mites in the genus Leptus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider carrying orange orbs
Sun, Oct 12, 2008 at 6:53 AM
I found this spider while digging a trench in my lawn in April, 2008. There was no web in sight. The spider seemed to be just walking along. My first thought was that it was carrying it’s eggs somewhere. I took a few pictures, then continued with my trench. After a few days, I began to wonder exactly what kind of spider it was and what it was doing, but haven’t been able to find out any more information. Thanks for your help.
TJ1028
Coastal southern California

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Hi TJ1028,
Your spider is actually another type of Arachnid in the order Opiliones, commonly called a Harvestman or Daddy-Long-Legs.  The orange orbs appear to be Parasitic Mites in the genus Leptus.  We originally thought the Mites were merely hitching a ride, a phenomenon known as Phoresy, but a search of BugGuide revealed the parasitic nature of the Mites.  There is some good dialog contributed by the BugGuide readership on the genus Leptus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

orange and violet ground spider
found these spiders under a rock in our backyard never seen one before and cant find anything online to identify them
Drew Audas
Wimberley, Tx (hill country)

Harvestman

Harvestman

Hi Drew,
This is some species of Harvestman in the order Opiliones.  Harvestmen are sometimes called Daddy Long Legs, and they are related distantly to spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination