Currently viewing the category: "Nests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bald faced hornet nest
Geographic location of the bug:  Washington D.C. Metro area, USA
Date: 05/19/2018
Time: 07:57 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A couple weeks ago I was surprised when I noticed a “beehive” (I know they’re not bees) newly under construction right to the side of my garage. I was really surprised because it’s being built ON the siding! I was able to find out it’s a bald faced hornets nest. Now I need to figure out what to do about it. From what I’ve researched it should only be the Queen in there right now…which would explain why I’ve only ever seen one hornet on it. I don’t wanna kill her like everyone keeps telling me to but I do need to remove it. What is the best way to do so where I’m not gonna get killed by this thing or kill her?!
*I may have a slight irrational fear of all things “bee”.
The first pic I included is of the nest about three days ago. The second pic is just to show where on the house the nest is located.
How you want your letter signed:  Christine O.

Bald Faced Hornet Nest

Hi Christine,
We can see by the images you provided that this Bald Faced Hornet nest is positioned so it is near the entrance to your home.  Hornets are social wasps that will defend the nest.  While we acknowledge your quandary regarding this matter, alas we do not provide extermination advice.  We would advise you to act before the queen Bald Faced Hornet’s first brood become adults as the workers will help her to defend the nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp??
Geographic location of the bug:  Byrnestown qld. 4625.
Date: 03/07/2018
Time: 01:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have had a lovely yellow and black wasp  building a very small mud nest on the toilet seat of all places! I have not seen another one like her, there are a lot of the mud dauber wasps that build their nests everywhere in the house, this ones stripes are more yellow than the mud dauber, she was trying to put a caterpillar in the nest but caught me watching her and took off  and I haven’t seen her return, usually the mud dauber wasps don’t care if you watch them, actually can get very close, would you happen to know the species?, seems very shy.
How you want your letter signed:  Leigh

Potter Wasp Nest

Dear Leigh,
This looks to us like the nest of a Potter Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae, a subfamily well represented with yellow and black individuals from Australia pictured on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “Potter Wasps in Eumeninae build mud nest. They are solitary wasps. They are typically black and yellow or black and orange in colours. Potter wasps usually prey on caterpillars which they paralyze and place inside cells in their nests for their young. Nests are either dug into the ground, constructed from mud, in wood, or in existing burrows of their hosts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery nest
Geographic location of the bug:  Buenos Aires, Argentina
Date: 01/12/2018
Time: 10:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Mr Bugman,
I come to ask you about the small nest that’s formed on my ficus tree. I live in the Southern Hemisphere and it’s summer right now. I suspect it’s some kind of wasp nest. What can you tell me about it? Also, should I just leave it alone?
It’s about 5 cm x 4 cm x 4 cm by the way
How you want your letter signed:  Sofi

Potter Wasp Nest

Dear Sofi,
You are correct that this is a Wasp Nest, and since it is a non-aggressive solitary Potter Wasp, there is no need to fear it or to remove it.  Potter Wasps or Mason Wasps in the subfamily Eumeninae construct nests of mud.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Potter Wasp Nest

Thank you!!! It’s so cool you were able to identify it!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Another query for you
Geographic location of the bug:  Tarn region, South West France
Date: 10/18/2017
Time: 11:25 AM EDT
Hi bugman Daniel,
Thanks for your speedy reply and for answering my question. Great service! I think your website is fantastic, with so much info there – you must be really fascinated by all these bugs.
I have another query for you. Another piece of wood, this time poplar with about 1cm or just under half inch holes. The larvae have gone but left behind stuff like cotton wool with a hard case inside – now empty. I guess it’s another beetle, but bigger this time. Any ideas?
Best regards,
Phil Anfield

European Wool Carder Bee Nest, we believe

Hi again Phil,
We believe this is the nest of a European Wool Carder Bee, a species represented on BugGuide because it has been introduced to North America.  According to BugGuide:  “Females collect ‘wool’ from downy plants such as Lamb’s Ears to line their nest cavities.”  Here is a FlickR image and a BugGuide image of the nest.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Web ID
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 10/04/2017
Time: 09:33 AM EDT
I see these webs all over the ground in the field where I walk my dog. Do I need to worry about either of us being bit by what created it?
How you want your letter signed:  Susan L Gardner

Funnel Web

Dear Susan,
This is a Funnel Web, probably from a Grass Spider in the genus
Agelenopsis.  Of the Funnel Web Spider family Agelenidae, BugGuide states:  “For this family of spiders, the web is a horizontal, sheet-like web with a small funnel-like tube off to a side (or for some species, the middle of the web). This funnel is what the family is named for, and is used by the spider for hunting and protection. The spider will lay in wait in the funnel, and when an insect flies into, or lands on the web, the spider will rush out, very quickly check to see if it is prey, and if it is prey, bite it. The venom is fast-acting on the prey, so once the prey is subdued (within a second or two), the spider will drag the prey back into the funnel (for safety while eating, and to prevent other insects from recognizing the danger that lurks on the web…)  Depending on the species, the web may or may not be sticky. If the web is not sticky, the web will actually become tangled around the prey’s feet, ensnaring it in the web. Sometimes this may cause hardship for the spider later, because if the spider wanders across a web that is sticky… the spider may walk clumsily and become prey for another funnel weaver.  Web Locations:  The funnel web for the genera Agelenopsis and Hololena are distinctive, and often are noticed in bushes and grass, especially in the early fall mornings where the dew has collected on the web. The webs can be expansive, covering several square feet, or just small webs in the grass.”  Grass Spiders are not considered dangerous to humans or dogs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Nest thing
Location: Oklahoma, USA
August 13, 2017 11:02 pm
This is up above out back doorway and I cant find it anywhere on google or anywhere! Mum thought it was a birds nest…
Signature: Edward

Paper Wasp Nest

Dear Edward,
This appears to be the nest of a Paper Wasp in the genus Polistes.  The individuals in your image look very dark, leading us to believe they might be
Polistes metricus which is described on BugGuide as “Very dark–abdomen is black and the thorax dark reddish-brown with black lines. Tibiae and tarsi are yellow.”  Based on BugGuide data, the species is reported from Kansas.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “Not as aggressive as Hornets or Yellowjackets. Often build nests under eaves. May be considered beneficial to gardeners (feed on herbivorous insects).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination