Currently viewing the category: "Tussock Moths"
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Blue & Yellow striped head Tiger Moth?
Hi there!
This poor little girl (I think it’s female because it’s antennae are narrow and not super-feathery) was banging up against my sliding glass door during last night’s rain storm, while all other more sensible moths were hiding out in dry places. Based on your myriad of moth photos I’m thinking it’s some sort of Tiger Moth, is this right? I am in the Chicago area and this is my first sighting of this particular type of moth in the 6 years I’ve lived in Kane County Illinois. I hope 3 pics aren’t too many. She was so pretty I felt I had to capture every angle! 🙂 After taking pics, we let her go this morning.
Michelle Nash

Hi Michelle,
We are very excited to get your Tiger Moth photo. It is the second new Tiger Moth species to arrive today. Your specimen is a Banded Tussock Moth, Halysidota tessellaris. According to BugGuide, it is found east of the Rockies and is often attracted to lights.

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Whitemarked (Yellow) Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Hi There,
I didn’t see this guy on your site. I came across it on a stinging caterpillar website. I’m glad I didn’t know it could sting when it was on me! I was gentle with it though and had no irritation after photographing it and shooing it away. These pictures were taken along the Brandywine River in PA in Jun 2005.
Sarah

Hi Sarah,
We actually have many photos of White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillars, Orgyia leucostigma, on our site. We suspect you never checked our five caterpillar pages.

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Unknown caterpillar?
Hi there!
We were watering the plants in the yard and came across three of these on our geranium and one on our rosebush. We live on the central coast in California and have never seen these in our yard. The closest match we could find is the White Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar. Watcha’ think?
Thanks,
Jon and Emily

Hi Jon and Emily,
A closely related species to the White Marked Tussock Moth is the Western Tussock Moth, Orgyia vetusta. That is your caterpillar.

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Help me PLEASE
Hi Bugman,
All I can say is WOW!!!!! What a WONDERFUL site. The BEST bug site
I’ve seen. Thank you.
I love to photograph all sorts of “Creepy Crawlers and Fliers” I live
in Chicago, Illinois. I’m also including a couple photo’s of what I believe to be a White marked Tussock Moth caterpillar that I found in Minnesota that you might like for your site. Thanks again for having a GREAT site.
Glenn

Hi Glenn,
Your Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar photos are studio quality. They remind us of fashion photos.

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catapiller in Wisconsin
Hi, I don’t know very much a bout bugs and things crawly things, but while in Wisconsin this past Labor Day when my sister and I came upon this out-of-this-world looking Catapiller. We were on a path about 100ft from Lake Pepin in Maiden Rock, Wisconsin. Lake Pepin is actually part of the Mississippi River. I think it might be a Tussock Moth Caterpillar as seen in the 4th section of your site, but it certainly was fun to look at. My co-wroker here in Schaumburg, IL, Sue, told me about your site and suggested i send you it. By the way, the little guy was about 5 inches long, in case that helps, and Sue is Lisa’s Mom.
John R.

Hi John,
Yes, this is a Tussock Moth, more specifically the White-Marked Tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma, but five inches long is enormous. Give Sue a big hug for us and tell her we miss her.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mystery caterpillar
Dear Bugman,
I’m hoping you can identify this caterpillar. We found it in our native plant nursery outside of Annapolis, MD and the closest picture I can find that looks like it is the Western Tussock Moth. Is there an eastern version, or is this one a vacationer here on the Chesapeake Bay? Or is this a totally different moth/butterfly? We have found many different caterpillars and have been able to figure out the parents of most of them, but this one has us stumped. (The farmer who leases the land to us is amazed that we are growing “weeds” but delighted by the butterflies.) Any help you give us would be greatly appreciated…we like to be able to tell children what the “bugs” are when they find them on the plants. The plant the caterpillar is sitting on is a Shining Sumac, Rhus copallina. Thanks….your website is amazing!
Ann

Hi Ann,
Thank you for getting back to us with the host plant, shining sumac. We were not going to give up until we identified your caterpillar because we love your letter. Long live the native weeds and thank you for sharing such a wonderful viewpoint with your children. We finally located your caterpillar on BugGuide. It is a Smeared Dagger Moth Caterpillar, Acronicta oblinita. Caterpillars of the Eastern Forests notes: “Pattern highly variable but always handsomely marked: generally dark, with dark or reddish dorsal warts bearing tuft of short bristly setae. Head black, shiny. Dorsum with or without abundant white speckling. Yellow, inverted V-shaped blotches separate white spiracles. Four fine setae extend out from others at either end of body. Food: many forbs, shrubs, and trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination