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Winged White and Brown
Location: Cebu, Philippines
February 10, 2012 2:21 am
Hey WTB, we’ve found this bug some time ago, and it really piqued my interest since this is the first time we’ve seen something like this in our place. Thanks, and more powers to this site!
Signature: Roi

Cucumber Moth

Dear Roi,
The distinctive brown and white markings and tufted abdomen make the Melonworm Moth,
Diaphania hyalinata, unmistakeable.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on cucumber family plants: cucumber, melon, squash. Can be pests. “

Correction Courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel Roi:
Since the location is in the Philippines I think it is more likely a related Asian species in the same genus, probably the Cucumber Moth (Diaphania indica ). This species does occur in the Philippines and its larval diet is very similar D. hyalinata. Regards.  Karl

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Moth?
Location: Mission, TX
August 16, 2011 9:36 pm
Took this photo at NBC Butterfly Park in Mission, TX. He is about 1/2 ” wide and long.
Signature: Troy Zurovec

Unknown Diurnal Moth

Hi Troy,
We had time to do this last post this morning, but no time to identify.  We did not find it on the Texas Entomology site of Diurnal Moths.  Perhaps one of our readers will take this identification on today.  Is the NBC Butterfly Park open air or a closed pavilion will all imported species?  Is this a wild moth or a cultivated moth?

NBC is an open air park, there is no enclosed environment.  It is right on the US/Mexico border.  This is a wild moth.  To my knowlege nothing has been introduced to the park.  To my knowledge all plant life in the park is native to the area.

Got an answer today – Orange-spotted Flower Moth, Syngamia florella

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

strange moth
Location: near Macon, GA
August 4, 2011 3:39 pm
I saw this moth outside my house yesterday (Aug 4 2011). I’ve never seen one before (having lived in the area for nearly a decade) and was hoping you could help me identify it. The back part of it is especially odd to me; it reminds me of a spinal column almost. The pictures are cropped to limit size, but hopefully they offer enough detail for you to be able to tell.
Signature: J

Unknown Moth

Dear J,
We tried and we failed.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck trying to identify this unusual moth.

Unknown Moth

Thanks to a comment, we now know that this is a Erythrina Borer, Terastia meticulosalis, and we verified that on BugGuide, but other than a food plant for the larva and a range that includes some southern states, we did not learn much else.  Erythrina is the genus name for a group of trees we have always called Coral Trees, and since some species are native to the warmer states, the moth might also be native.  We also located a link to a technical paper written in 1922 by O. H. Swezey, entitled The Erythrina Twig-Borer (Terastia meticulosalis) in Hawaii (Pyralidae, Lepidoptera).  Here is a citation from that paper:  “Dyar, in Journal of the New York Ent. Soc, IX, 21, 1901, describes the larva from Erythrina herbacea in southern Florida, and says: ‘The larva is an internal feeder, boring in the younger stems which it completely hollows out, killing them. When the plant is in early flower, the young flower heads are often killed and webbed up into a foul mass by this larva. Spins a large webby cocoon in the ground.'”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

leaf bug??
Location: southwest ohio
July 8, 2011 11:10 pm
this was hanging around the front porch light, around 11 pm est. looks like it should be a leaf bug, dont know if they have fuzzy legs though. it was small, less than half an inch
Signature: bibef

Unknown Moth

Dear bibef,
Other than knowing that this is a Moth, we haven’t a clue as to the family, much less the species.  This is going to take considerable research on our part as we have no clue where to begin to search.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the research.  Keep tuned to our website for any future updates.  This moth, which we suspect will not be confused with any other species once it is identified, is a very effective dead leaf mimic, however, we could not locate it on this Conservation Report webpage dedicated to creatures that mimic leaves.

Unknown Moth

Update: Boxwood Leaftier Moth
ID for July 8’s “Unknown Dead Leaf Mimic Moth”
July 12, 2011 11:36 pm
Graham Montgomery and Corey Husic at BugGuide identify this moth as probably being the Boxwood Leaftier, Galasa nigrinodis (#5552 on the Hodges list); see http://bugguide.net/node/view/544549. The BugGuide images of this species certainly make it seem like a good match!
Signature: W. Randy Hoffman

Ed. NOte: Here is the BugGuide link to the Boxwood Leaftier Moth.


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bushy-tailed Moth
Location:  Hawaii Island northeastern side
September 6, 2010 7:46 pm
Hello,
I have an odd moth that has ended up alive in my moth collecting jar. It has a bushy or furry type abdomen ending that is always moving like its alive or could be for mating(?). The wings have two see-thru panels in each wing. The fur is yellow brown on the top side. The moth has a 3/4in long body. I apologize in advance for the poor photo quality. Thanks for your help regarding this moth identification, I started to look but there are many.
Good day,
Signature:  k

Melonworm Moth

Dear K,
This is a Melonworm Moth,
Diaphania hyalinata.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on cucumber family plants: cucumber, melon, squash. Can be pests. Many generations (3?) in south, disperses northward in fall, does not persist there.”  We suspect it is an introduced species in Hawaii.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I’ve never seen a moth like this
May 30, 2010
I found it this morning hanging out on our front porch light in Memphis, TN. It was very small – less than an inch. Ever seen one like this?
Tim
Memphis, TN

Boxwood Leaftier Moth

Hi Tim,
This sure is a crazy looking moth, and we do not know what it is.  Microlepidoptera always give us a hard time.  We will post this as a mystery announcement and hopefully we will get some assistance.

Boxwood Leaftier Moth

Thanks.  Someone on BugGuide just identified it as Galasa nigrinodis – Boxwood Leaftier Moth.
Tim

Update:  Moth Identified
May 31, 2010
Bugophile sent us a comment yesterday identifying this creature as a Boxwood Leaftier Moth, Galasa nigrinodis, and we found matching images on BugGuide “Larvae “tie together and eat dead leaves of boxwood.” (1) Boxwood is Buxus, apparently not native to North America. B. sempervirens is called “American Boxwood”, likely due to its longstanding popularity in cultivation. The moth appears to be native to North America–it is unclear what the native hostplants might be, perhaps other genera in the family Buxaceae. Allegheny Spurge, Pachysandra procumbens is one such native plant, but no information can be found on its possible hostplant status.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination