Currently viewing the category: "Pyralid and Snout Moths"
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Subject: Mystery Moth
Location: Southern California
July 21, 2017 7:24 pm
Do you know the name of this moth? It was hanging on my house today, July 21. It is under 1″ in length. It looks like it should be on a tree.
Signature: Terry

Unknown Snout MOth

Dear Terry,
We are pretty confident this is a Snout Moth in the superfamily Pyraloidea, but we have not had any luck securing an identification on either BugGuide or the Moth Photographers Group.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had.

Thanks so much, Daniel. There’s a great website for it natural history in orange county California that UC Irvine sponsors, and that’s my usual go to.
http://nathistoc.bio.uci.edu/lepidopt/Moths.htm
But this moth was not on that site and was so distinct with those green eyes and that beautiful wood bark finish that I thought for sure someone be able to ID it. I am going to post it on my Instagram page and see if any of the avid insect people there can come up with an ID. If they do, I will get back to you.
Thanks,
Terry

Hi Terry,
We also checked that site and as you observed, there is no similar looking moth.

Karl identifies Crambid Snout Moth
Hello Daniel and Terry:
This is a Crambid Snout Moth, probably a White-trimmed Abegesta (Crambidae: Glaphyriinae: Abegesta remellalis); aka White-trimmed Brown Pyralid. It could also be another moth in the same genus, A. reluctalis. I can’t really tell the difference between them and both are found in Southern California. Regards, Karl

Thanks Karl,
The genus is also represented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: clear wing moth
Location: Swakopmund Namibia
May 4, 2017 7:11 am
Hi
Please tell me this is a new species
Signature: svensown@yahoo.co.uk

Cucumber Moth

Dear swensown,
This is NOT a Clearwing Moth.  Because of its striking resemblance to the North American Melonworm Moth, we knew this had to be a relative in the same genus, which allowed us to quickly identify the Cucumber Moth,
Diaphania indica, thanks to the African Moths site.  The species is also well represented on iSpot.

Thanks very much. You’re info is awesome. Keep it up. Well done
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown moth
Location: Gilbert, Arizona, USA
April 4, 2017 5:59 pm
I found this moth in Gilbert Arizona today. It was out and aboit in bright daylight. The moth was about the size of an American penny.
Signature: Paul

Snout Moth

Dear Paul,
We are relatively confident that this is a Snout Moth in the superfamily Pyraloidea, but alas, we have poured through both BugGuide and the Moth Photographers Group to no avail.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery moth? Haven’t seen much bugs in my city
Location: Riverside, tropical sub urban area
March 10, 2017 9:04 am
This is probably common to some, but where I live now, a forest turned into a housing village, bugs are a pretty rare sighting. This bug looks like a moth, with a pearly back outlined by a black band. It also has a paint brush like tail that keeps fluttering.
Signature: Anything, I guess, kind of new here, still learning about the this interesting site

Melonworm Moth

This is a Moth in the genus Diaphania, and it might be the Melonworm Moth, Diaphania hyalinata, which is a species found in North America and that is pictured on BugGuide.  There are other similar looking members from the genus pictured on BugGuide, and the world contains additional species.  We don’t know where Riverside is located.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth??
Location: Southern California
November 24, 2016 2:39 pm
My father showed me a picture of this insect. We think it is a moth but have been unable to determine what insect is this. We live in Southern California and the picture was taken in September on the border of Los Angeles and San Bernardino county. We see lots of interesting and familiar insects around here but we have never seen this one before or since.
Thank you!
Signature: Tracy O

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

Dear Tracy,
This distinctive moth is an Erythrina Borer,
Terastia meticulosalis, and according to BugGuide, it is a:  “Tropical species that ranges north to the US from Florida to California.”

Thank you so much for getting back to us so quickly. We are going to look further into this moth now that we have a name. We appreciate your help!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Insect?
Location: Lima, Perú
August 10, 2016 1:10 pm
Hi I’m Luis Calle from Perú. I just came to Lima and before entering to my house I saw this little insect. I don’t know if it flies. Should I catch it? I have never seen this one before. I think it has 6 legs and 2 of them are in the front. It’s 2cm long , maybe 3cm. I forgot to mention that it has a sting like a scorpion, pointing to its body. Contact me if is needed.
Signature: Luis C.

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Dear Luis,
First we need to state that identifying insects from countries that do not have extensive web databases of creatures can be very difficult, and Peru is one such country.  Our first thought upon viewing the dorsal view you provided was that this might be a Fly in the order Diptera (only two wings visible in the image), possibly a Stilt Legged Fly in the family Neriidae, but once we opened the lateral view (thanks so much for including these two valuable views) we realized we were looking at a moth in the order Lepidoptera.  Our search for similar looking moths led us to BugGuide where we found the Eggplant Leafroller Moth, and though BugGuide indicates its range is “southern United States (Florida to California), south to Chile; …” we are quite confident your images represent a different species, but there is enough visual similarity for us to surmise they may be in the same family, the Crambid Snout Moth family Crambidae.  We tried briefly searching that possibility to no avail, including scanning Insetologia from nearby Brazil.  This Jade Scorpion Moth from Peru on Learn About Butterflies has a similar posture, but it is obviously a different species, and it is identified as being in the family Pyralidae, which is taxonomically included with the family Crambidae in the superfamily Pyraloidea.  Our time right now is running short, so we are posting your images and tagging it as unidentified, but classifying it as a Snout Moth, and perhaps one of our readers will write in with some suggestions.

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Hi Daniel,
I have posted the moth i found on 4chan. It has some images that may help you.
Link: http://boards.4chan.org/an/thread/2187282/new-insect

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination