Currently viewing the category: "Plume Moths"

Subject: What in the name of all that is holy…
Location: Atlanta, GA
March 12, 2015 7:24 pm
Well, we had a few warm days for early march, even saw some grasshoppers oustide. Saw this thing on why house. My first thought was “How does that even work?”
Signature: Caleb

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Dear Caleb,
This distinctive insect is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae, but we are not certain of the species.
  The wings form the top bar of the letter T, and we frequently get requests to identify T-Bugs.

Subject: I call Airplane Bug
Location: North Hills, CA
February 3, 2015 8:38 am
I saw this insect on my screen this morning and wanted to know what it was. I call it the Airplane Bug.
Signature: Sue

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Hi Sue,
Without even looking at your image, we figured your Airplane Bug must be a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae, and we were correct.  May readers call Plume Moths by the name T-Bugs.

Subject: Identification
Location: Hoghton, Lancs. UK. PR5 0JY.
September 6, 2014 8:26 am
I photographed this creature on the wall of my house, It appears to have a fixed wing cover for its flight wings. Unfortunately it disappeared in a flash as I wasn’t looking. I have checked several books but can’t see anything like it. I have from the photo calculated it’s dimensions as 30mm wingspan and
15mm. body length.
Signature: J.B. Lewis (Mr.)

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Dear Mr. J.B. Lewis,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae, but we are not certain of the species.

Subject: I think some kinda dragon bug
Location: Cambrigde Ontario
June 25, 2014 9:16 am
I was walking in my house and found this bug on my siding on my house and I was wording if you could tell what kinda bug it is and the name of it
Signature: Anthony L Johnson

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Hi Anthony,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae and it looks similar to this individual from BugGuide.

Subject: Lots of them on the windows
Location: Columbia Valley, SE British Columbia . Canada
May 10, 2014 8:32 pm
Would like to learn what these are. Such fine looking wings
Signature: Larry

Many Plumed Moth

Many Plumed Moth

Hi Larry,
This is a gorgeous image of a Many Plumed Moth in the genus
Alucita.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae are associated with snowberry (Symphoricarpos spp.; Caprifoliaceae) in the north, and honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.) in California” so we are deducing you must have those plants nearby to account for the large numbers of adult moths.

Thanks Daniel
Yes we have lots of snowberry growing in the meadows by our cabin, which the Ruffed Grouse love to eat in the fall.
Larry