Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Very Large Unusual Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Leicestershire
Date: 05/31/2020
Time: 04:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, I saw this huge moth in the middle of the day, on the pavement outside my house. It was struggling to fly. Any ideas what it is? I’ve never seen anything like it!
How you want your letter signed:  Kerry

Privet Hawkmoth

Dear Kerry,
According to UK Moths, the Privet Hawkmoth is your
largest resident hawk-moth, which is distributed in the southern half of Britain, and has distinctive pink and black barring on the body.  The similarly-striped hindwings are often concealed.  It frequents woodland and suburban habitats, and flies in June and July, with a single generation.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Wakefield Quebec
Date: 05/27/2020
Time: 10:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was a pleasant surprise today to my 5 year old son/ant and bug collector
How you want your letter signed:  Gene

Luna Moth

Dear Gene,
We are so excited that your submission is our first Luna Moth posting of the year, though one can only guess how many Luna Moth submissions arrived between April 21 when Daniel last checked his emails and now.  Canadian sightings are occur around June, and our earliest sightings, sometimes as early as January or February, are generally from Texas and Florida.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Gentle Readers,
Since the onset of COVID-19, Daniel has been overwhelmed with computer based activities, including teaching college students online and running ZOOM meetings, and to maintain mindfulness as well as having a real sense of physical accomplishment, he has eschewed all leisurely contact with the computer, including responding to and posting your many submitted identification queries, and he has instead devoted time to being in contact with the earth, his garden and the diversity of wildlife and plants that share that space with him.  Please forgive his inattentions to this website he really does love so much.  He has not been troubled with ill health, either physical or mental.  He just feels the need to unplug, slow down and enjoy life.  While it is not much to look at, this tattered Cramer’s Sphinx is the second that has visited his porch recently, the first being a much more beautiful individual in 2015, and allegedly the first local sighting in 50 years. There are only three sightings on BugGuide, so this must really be a North American rarity.  In order to be certain of this identification, Daniel has consulted both Julian Donahue and Bill Oehlke.

Cramer’s Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Crimson bug species? Panama fauna!
Geographic location of the bug:  San Miguelito, Panama.
Date: 04/14/2020
Time: 05:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman. I’ve only seen this bug twice in my life 3 years appart first in 2009 and then in 2012. Both times it was just standing still inside my house and both insects were identical. Back then there were a lot of jungle-like green areas around my house for context. This bug was about 5cm / 2 inches long, had “feathery” antennae, transparent wings, the most posterior part of the abdomen was “hairy” (i think the sides of the abdomen were hairy too but less hairy) and I confirmed it was capable of flight as I accidentaly startled it when I was taking the photo. Well as you can see most of the body is colored with (really strong) red and black. The thorax has two parallel white lines. I never saw the ventral part of the insect.
Is this a moth? A butterfly? This question has been haunting me for 10 years. Well thanks and have fun with this one!
PS:Sorry if I used wrong terms in my anatomical description.
How you want your letter signed:  A curious physician

Scarlet Tipped Wasp Moth

Dear curious physician,
We are impressed that you identified this as a moth or butterfly.  It is a Moth, but one that is often mistaken for a wasp.  It is a Scarlet Tipped Wasp Moth,
Dinia aeagrus, and we identified it on Project Noah.  You can also find it pictured on FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silver City, NM
Date: 03/22/2020
Time: 08:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There were hundreds of these butterflies on this one type of bush. I tried to get close to them to get a good photo but they would all fly off. I caught one but didn’t want to kill it to get a good picture so I apologize for the poor photos. The spots on the wings are yellow. They are small, like skippers. I did look through the photos on your website but couldn’t find it.
How you want your letter signed:  Karen Nakakihara

Diurnal Moth: Litocala sexsignata

Dear Karen,
Butterflies are generally thought of as diurnal and moths as nocturnal, but this is actually a diurnal Moth that flies during the day.  We have identified it as
Litocala sexsignata thanks to Butterflies and Moths of North America where it states:  “Adults are diurnal. They may be seen nectaring at flowers or sipping moisture in muddy spots.”   According to BugGuide:  “common to abundant in some areas; uncommon in others.”  This species has no common name.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sunshine Coast, Queensland
Date: 02/29/2020
Time: 04:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
This moth stopped by and stuck with me for an hour. Ive never seen a moth like it, and was super interested to know what it was? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie

Macroglossum errans

Dear Melanie,
We apologize for the long delay.  We had identified your Hawkmoth as
Macroglossum errans on Butterfly House before the world as we know it changed due to COVID-19, but we did not complete a posting.  This pretty little moth does not have a common name.  There are also some images on the Butterflies of a Dorrigo Garden and Moths site where it states:  “”Flight habit:  Nocturnal – Active at night including early evening.”

Macroglossum errans

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination