Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White beetle moth bug
Location: West Virginia
June 18, 2017 12:31 pm
My friend found this and I want to know what it is too.
Signature: Kiana

Possibly Virginian Tiger Moth

Dear Kiana,
This is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and there are several similar looking white species.  We believe based on BugGuide images that this is a Virginian Tiger Moth,
Spilosoma virginica, but there are other similar looking species in the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What exactly is this type of moth
Location: Mason City Iowa
June 18, 2017 5:41 pm
This was in a city park hanging out at the base of the shelter pillar. It was not fond of moving about and needed about a 100 ft runway to get going to fly away. The moth just crawled onto my hand when I put in front of it. It was about 70 degrees in nornthern Iowa at about 5pm with a lightly wooded area as well as nature trails and farm land. The park is on the edge of tow .
Signature: Jarid

Modest Sphinx

Dear Jarid,
You can verify our identification of this Modest Sphinx or Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx modesta, with images posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very pretty moth
Location: Crosslanes, West Virginia
June 3, 2017 4:08 am
I Have never seen a moth like this I’ve spent many of my summers in Webster County ,Cowen,West Virginia and have seen similar moths it’s like their furry almost like if you would touch them they would be as soft as a kitten although I never have I know that hurts them but it struck me odd when I saw it I have lived here my whole life and never seen one like that he is on the side of my purse and he started fluttering around like he was doing a mating call the picture was taken June 3, 2017 at 1:08 am
Signature: Susan S

Eyed Tiger Moth

Dear Susan,
These images of an Eyed Tiger Moth or Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia, on your colorful purse are positively psychedelic.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on a great variety of broad-leaved plants, including banana, cabbage, cherry, dandelion, maple, orange, sunflower, violet, willow.”  We will be post-dating your submission to go live later in the month when our editorial staff is away from the office on holiday.

Eyed Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth: Satellite or what
Location: near Lake Chapala, Ajijic, Mexico
June 3, 2017 7:59 am
I first thought this was an Achemon Sphinx … then decided it was a Satellite … but still not sure. The body markings look different. Found near Lake Chapala in Ajijic, Mexico.
Signature: jwycoff

Sphinx Moth: Which Eumorpha species???

Dear jwycoff,
We agree that this Sphinx Moth is in the genus Eumorpha, and we searched Sphingidae of the Americas, and we are left with three possibilities.  It most closely resembles images of
Eumorpha anchemolus pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas, but we would not eliminate the possibility that it might be the Satellite Sphinx, Eumorpha satellitia, which is also pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas.  Eumorpha triangulum is the third species pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas that looks similar.  We will write to Bill Oehlke for confirmation.  He may request permission to post your image to his site.  Again, we are favoring Eumorpha anchemolus.  Because we will be away from the office on holiday, we are post-dating your submission to go live to our site later in the month while we are away.

Daniel … thanks for such a quick turnaround. From the three choices, I’d agree with you … and assume from the pics that it’s male.
I am happy for you and Bill and anyone interested to use the photo. And how fun to have this posted to your site. Thanks for being such a great place to explore.
Have a great holiday.
joyce

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Moth
Location: Tacoma, Washington USA
June 8, 2017 6:05 am
Found this moth hanging around a black currant. Pictures don’t really show it, but at a distance of a couple feet, the moth is really difficult to see flying, and even harder to see on the currant branch. Saw it flying in the same area three times during the day. Only saw it land only once. Got the pictures then. Body is 13-15 mm. I didn’t notice the insect shell it is standing on until I looked at the pictures. Don’t know if they’re related.
Signature: Ralph

Currant Clearwing Borer

Dear Ralph,
This is one of the Clearwing Borer Moths in the family Sesiidae, a group with many members that are excellent wasp mimics.  Thanks so much for supplying the name of the host plant because we were able to quickly identify your Currant Clearwing Borer,
Synanthedon tipuliformis, thanks to images on BugGuide where it states:  “Larvae bore in the canes and branches of species of currants and gooseberries (Ribes, Saxifragaceae) and to a lesser extent blackberries (Rubus, Rosaceae). “

Currant Clearwing Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Underwing moth?
Location: Mayfield, KY
June 7, 2017 11:29 am
I have been trying to identify this moth for some time now. The closest match I have found in my book is a Widow Underwing. This was found in Western Kentucky in May.
Signature: Janet Fox

Underwing

Dear Janet,
We agree that this appears to be an Underwing in the genus
Catocala, but we do not have the necessary skills to provide a definitive species identification for you.  According to BugGuide:  “Lafontaine & Schmidt (2010) listed 101 species of the genus Catocala in America north of Mexico. Powell & Opler (2009) reported 110 species in all of North America, and about 230 worldwide.”  Many of those species look quite similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination