Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Imperial Moth
Location: NorthWest NJ
June 14, 2013 6:55 am
Hi, I found this amazing moth today, Friday, June 14, 2013 @ 8:07 a.m.. I believe it is an Imperial moth, are they common in NJ? It seems that his wings are very wet so he is unable to fly and it is a bit chilly out. Should I bring him indoors to dry out and warm up?
Signature: NikkiRu

Imperial MOth

Imperial MOth

Dear NikkiRu,
Was this shot in a cemetary?  We love your photograph, but we would recommend cropping it to include the top of the cross which would move the Imperial Moth out of the center of the frame.

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Goid morning,
Actually both the cross and moth are in my backyard.  I will adjust the photo and resend later today for you.
Thanks!
Nicole

Imperial MOth

Imperial MOth

Thanks Nicole.  We added the new photo to the posting.  We never responded to your question about taking the Imperial Moth indoors.  Especially since she is a female who is most likely releasing pheromones to attract a mate, taking her indoors might not be the best idea.


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moth is this
Location: Virginia Beach , Va
June 14, 2013 7:07 am
What a gorgeous moth with a 5 in wing span. Literally as big as my hand . Please let me know what kind it is. Been in Virginia Beach for over 20 years and I’ve never seem one like this. Thanks!
Signature: Jennifer T

Black Witch

Black Witch

Dear Jennifer,
This is a male Black Witch, a species that has annual migrations north from Mexico each year with some individuals reaching Canada.  These migrations have been documented since the nineteenth century, but it is unclear why the migrations occur since the species cannot survive or reproduce north of the border states.  The Black Witch Moth: Its Natural and Cultural History should answer any additional questions you might have.

Thank You for the quick response!   I looked thru so many photos and they all started to look the same. What a fantastic website!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found trembling in our office
Location: San Diego, California
June 14, 2013 8:37 am
A damsel in distress called me to remove a ”big black moth”. I found her in a corner. Had her crawl on my hand and took some pics. After that she flew off and danced around me and landed on my back and crawled up to my ear as to say ”please take me outside”. I gently grabbed her and I did what she ask.
While doing so I was telling my co-workers about your site and was going to ID the moth. I went 10 pages deep and couldn’t find her.
Thanx in advance!
Signature: Mike Coniglio

Leucanella species???

Leucanella species

Dear Mike,
We just spent considerable time trying to identify your Giant Silk Moth by browsing through the members of the genus
Automeris that are found in Mexico.  We had no success, and then we found members of another genus, Leucanella, and we believe we found your moth, however, we cannot be certain of the species.  This is a most unusual sighting, and to the best of our knowledge, Leucanella species do not stray as far north as San Diego.  See Leucanella lynx on Kirby Wolfe’s website, various Leucanella species on the Fauna of Paraguay website and various members in the genus on Saturniidae World.    We are contacting Bill Oehlke to try to get an identification.  We suspect he will likely want to document this sighting and we would request that you also provide him with access to your photos.  The big mystery for us is how did this moth get to San Diego??  Is it possible someone in your office who might raise moths is playing a joke?

Leucanella species???

Leucanella species

Bill Oehlke Confirms and Questions
Hi Daniel,
It is a Leucanella species.
There are many san Diegos in the world.
Please check to see if you can find country. Even in some central and south
American coutries there is more than one san diego.
Bill

Ed. Note: We did write back to Bill to confirm the sighting was San Diego, California.

WOW Daniel!
No, no one here in the office would do anything like that.
Our office is located at 2241 Kettner Blvd. San Diego, CA. (32° 43.658’N- 117° 10.232’W). As you can see from the Google Earth kmz file of our location, we are right under the flight path of incoming planes to San Diego International  airport. There are no direct flights from South America to San Diego. Maybe it was a stowaway on a plane?
If you need anymore, please contact me.
Thank you,
Mike

Bill Oehlke provides additional input.
Hi Daniel,
I think this is a prank with regard to location or something someone
imported from at least as far south as central Mexico.
Sometimes there can be wind assisted strays, especially if there has been a
severe storm, but San Diego California is a bit far west of the path of most
tropical storms.
It is a Leucanella female, but without knowing its true source of original
location, I would only be guessing at species.
Bill

Early Morning Ruminations:  12?51 AM Saturday June 15
2013
We can’t help but to wonder if we might be the first to report on a range expansion due to global warming, or perhaps she is only a stowaway on a plane.  Maybe one or more Leucanella caterpillars were smuggled in from Mexico.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Polyphemus & Luna Moths
Location: St. Mary’s County, MD
June 10, 2013 10:34 am
We hit the jackpot this spring. One of my children brought home 2 cocoons that she found on the ground at a nearby playground, so we put them on the front porch in a butterfly habitat and started waiting. Last month, a polyphemus moth emerged, and last week a luna moth followed. We live at the bottom of Maryland on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, and we don’t usually see luna moths this early in the summer. By the way, my 10 y.o. thinks the polyphemus was a male and the luna was a female. Is she correct?
Signature: Laura

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Hi Laura,
My you were lucky.  What a wonderful experience for your children to have experience these eclosions in a butterfly habitat.  The Polyphemus is definitely a male because of his plumose antennae.  The Luna is most likely a female as the antennae are not quite as feathery.  If you had kept the female in the habitat for a day or so, she might have attracted one or more males.  Have you ever attempted to raise caterpillars of the Giant Silk Moths in your area?  You should see if there is a National Moth Week event registered somewhere in your vicinity this year.  It might be a nice family outing.

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: is that bee or butterfly?
Location: Borneo
June 4, 2013 4:35 am
Hi, my friend found that on Borneo and we cannot find what is is, does anybody know if it´s dangerous or harmless?
Thanks
Signature: Catherine

Dysphania sagana

Dysphania species

Hi Catherine,
This is neither a bee nor a butterfly.  It is a moth, more specifically, Dysphania sagana, a member of the family Geometridae, which we first found on this blog and verified on the Moths of Borneo website.
  We suspected it to be a diurnal moth, and this was confirmed on this Indonesian blog that also pictures the caterpillar.  The Siam Insect Zoo website also has some photos, but they have fewer spots than the image you submitted.  A drawing of a related species, Dysphania militaris, is also included, and that might be the moth you have submitted.  That seems to be confirmed with the Butterfly from Rejang Lang site.  We cannot be certain of the species, but we believe we have the genus correct.  There are nice photos of Dysphania militaris on the Critters Page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified moth, from Maracaibo, Venezuela.
Location: Maracaibo, Venezuela
June 2, 2013 10:16 pm
Hey, this guy flew into my room tonight. I’m used to Black witches poping in every now and then but I had never seen one like this. Both the stripe/collor pattern and the shape of the wings were quite distinctive. I was wondering if you could help me identify what kind of moth it is. (Sorry for the poor quality of the photos, but even in spite of it I think the main details can be picked out).
Signature: mudo

Banded Sphinx

Banded Sphinx

Dear mudo,
Most of our reports of Banded Sphinxes, Eumorpha fasciatus, are from North America, but we verified on the Sphingidae of the Americas website that it does range to South America including Venezuela.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination