Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lunate Zale
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/22/2020
Time: 8:35 AM EDT
While working in the yard, Daniel couldn’t help but to notice this new species to the porch light, a Lunate Zale, Zale lunata, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults – quite variable with both fore- and hindwings dark brown with shades of yellow, red brown and black, sometimes with white or silver marginal patches.”  The pronounced “shoulder pads” are not evident in most images, but The Natural History of Orange County includes images that reveal these unusual features.

Lunate Zale

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wtb
Geographic location of the bug:  South UK
Date: 06/07/2020
Time: 11:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can’t find this on the web. Can you identify it? It is on a south facing Passion flower.
Thanks,
GT
How you want your letter signed:  GT

Large Red-Belted Clearwing

Dear GT,
Though this looks like a Wasp, it is actually a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, and many members of the family benefit from mimicking stinging insects like Wasps.  We quickly identified your Large Red-Belted Clearwing,
Synanthedon culiciformis, on UK Moths where it states:  “The moth flies earlier in the year than many other clearwings, being on the wing in May and June.  The species inhabits heathland and woodland, where the host tree, birch (Betula abounds, and is known from much of mainland Britain.”  The site also states:  “Although generally larger than the similar Red-belted Clearwing, the sizes overlap and it is more easily distinguished by the orange-red suffusion at the base of the forewings” and that color is not evident in your images, so we would not rule out that your moth is a Red Belted Clearwing, Synanthedon myopaeformis.  According to UK Moths:  “The moths fly during the day but are not often seen, except by the use of pheromone lures. They occur from June to early August.”  Though the “orange-red suffusion” is not evident, we still believe your individual appears more like the former species.

Large Red Belted Clearwing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Flintstone, MD
Date: 06/02/2020
Time: 12:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t need this identified but thought I would share! Found this gem last night attached to my screen door. I was amazed by it’s beauty. After looking online I figured out it is a Luna Moth. Woke up this morning and he was on the wooden door frame of my screen door so I got some better pics of it. The pics I took last night didn’t turn out very good so I was excited when I saw he was still here!
How you want your letter signed:  Megan

Luna Moth

Thanks Megan,
We love posting images of Luna Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant type chunky moth thing
Geographic location of the bug:  Scotland
Date: 06/03/2020
Time: 04:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  On my dairy staircase this morning I woke up to find a giant moth type thing. It’s is huge computed to a moth and much chunkier. About half the size of my hand. Some
Googling shows maybe a hawk moth but I’m in Scotland not the tropics. I’m central Scotland near Glasgow.
How you want your letter signed:  Nicola Smith

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Nicola,
This impressive moth is a Poplar Hawkmoth.  According to Butterfly Conservation:  “Female comes to light before midnight, the male after midnight, in greater numbers. Rests with abdomen curved up and hindwings further forward than the forewings.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Name of moth/butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Alicante, Spain
Date: 05/06/2020
Time: 09:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have two of these beauties flying around our garden, one male one female as they have been trying to mate the last couple of days.
Does anyone recognise them? I’ve lived in Spain 15 years and never seen them here before.
They are lovely.
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Michaela

Butterfly Moth

Dear Michaela,
This is a Butterfly Moth,
Paysandisia archon, a South American species that has been introduced to Europe.  According to the Invasive Species Compendium, it:  “is a Neotropical species indigenous to South America: Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. In Europe it has been reported from Bulgaria, Cyprus, Denmark, France, Italy, Greece, Slovenia, Spain and the UK.”

Butterfly Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Fonhadela, Vila Real, Portugal.
Date: 05/22/2020
Time: 02:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello.I have been trying to identify this moth. But I do not know if it is Hemaris fuciformis or H.thysbe. Which one have I photographed? And what is the difference between both species?
Thank you. Isabel.
How you want your letter signed:  Informal

Broad Bordered Bee Hawkmoth

We believe this is a Broad Bordered Bee Hawkmoth, Hemaris fuciformis, and not Hemaris thysbe, a new world species.  It is pictured on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic and on Insecta.pro where it states:  “It flies from late May to early July.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination