Currently viewing the category: "Underwing Moths and Fruit Piercing Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Underwing Moth resting on mossy bark
Location: SE Michigan
September 24, 2011 6:52 pm
Hello, Bugman: Spotted this large underwing moth flying around eratically during the afternoon; was surprised both by it’s size and that it was flying during a sunny afternoon. Not sure which of the many kinds of Underwings this one is, but it was about 2.5 inches across. It landed on a tree, hoping to ”blend-in” with it’s cryptic patterning. I was able to get 2 nice close-ups, before it fluttered away. Thought you might like to add this shot to your Underwing info.
Signature: Chris O.

Underwing

Hi Chris,
Thanks so much for sending your photo of an Underwing Moth.  We posted another photo earlier today and we wrote about the camouflage ability of the Underwing Moths.  Though your mossy trunk does not effectively hide this individual, our readers should be able to imagine it blending in on a lighter barked tree.  While we don’t believe the Underwing has the ability to choose a tree that will effectively hide it, we do believe that those moths that blend into the trees in a specific area will survive and then subsequently pass on the traits that determine their coloration to their offspring.  Your description of the Underwing flying during daylight hours is very accurate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Two differnt butterflies
Location: eastern, canada
September 24, 2011 8:26 am
There is two different type of butterflies and I don’t know what is type is.
Signature: M.o

Underwing

Dear M.o,
You have mistaken an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala for a butterfly.  Underwing Moths usually have forewings that are patterned like tree bark.  When the Underwing Moth rests on the trunk of a tree, it is perfectly camouflaged, and when it flies, its brightly colored underwings present a flashy appearance.  A predator will be fooled once a flying moth comes to rest hiding the brightly colored underwings.  Your other butterfly is a Red Admiral.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brown and red butterfly
Location: Colorado
July 21, 2011 3:44 am
Hey! You’re team is apparently very good at identifying insects and things, so I was wondering if you happen to know what this little creature is. My friend took the pictures at night outside is home in Colorado, but I’m pretty sure it’s a butterfly (since its wings are vertical in the second pic). Other than that, I am having no luck in identifying it. Any idea what kind of butterfly this is?
Signature: Mandooooo

Underwing

Dear Mandooooo,
This is actually a moth and not a butterfly.  Underwing Moths in the genus
Catocala are characterized by drab forewings that blend in with tree bark, and boldly marked and colored underwings that show in flight.  If the moth is startled and flies, it displays its bright colors, but when it alights on a tree, it seems to vanish.  Any predators will be hunting for a brightly colored tasty morsel, and they may easily overlook the now camouflaged Underwing Moth.

Underwing Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this moth
Location: Waco Texas
May 12, 2011 9:42 am
What is this moth? Found it in Central Texas on an oak tree in May 2011.
I enjoy your site.
Thank you
Signature: Ann

Probably Underwing Moth

Dear Ann,
We believe this is an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala.  Underwing Moths usually have brownish grey patterned forewings that resemble tree bark which camouflages the moths quite well while they are at rest.  The underwings are often more brightly colored and more boldly marked.  When the moth is forced to fly during daylight hours, the bright forewings capture the attention of a predator who is then unable to locate the moth once it comes to rest because it blends in so well with its surroundings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Underwing Moth
Location: Ancaster, Ontario
November 16, 2010 4:58 am
This underwing invited itself into the house and I took the photos in June of this year. I captured it in a vase to get a closer look and to take some pictures of it (and also to keep my cats from eating it) and then let it go back outside.
I love their aerodynamic little faces.
Signature: Cheryl-Anne

Greater Yellow Underwing

Hi Cheryl-Anne,
We nearly went dizzy scrolling through all the individuals in the Owlet Moth family Noctuidae on the Moth Photographers Group which does not recognize the newer taxonomy on BugGuide of the superfamily Noctuoidae.  This is one large family or superfamily, but we finally found
Noctua pronuba on the Moth Photographers Group on Plate 33 (Noctuidae, Noctuinae), and it matches your moth.  BugGuide identifies Noctua pronuba by the common names Greater Yellow Underwing, Large Yellow Underwing or Winter Cutworm (larva) and states that it was:  “Introduced from Europe to Nova Scotia in 1979, this species has since spread north to the Arctic Ocean, west to the Pacific, and south to the Gulf of Mexico.

Greater Yellow Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

help with the ID please
Location:  Nagpur City,Maharashtra State,India
August 14, 2010 4:41 am
Hi again.
WTB has helpd me to start observing the beauties of nature again.so whenever i come across something that catches my eye i click it.used to do it earlier but kinda lost touch.thanks to WTB that i felt like starting with it again.
yesterday i came across this pretty moth.need your help with the identification.does it belong to the Catocala family?
thanks a lot.
Abhishek Sagar

Moth from India

Hi Abhishek,
We need to do some research on this moth, but we do not believe it is in the genus Catocala, but it may be in the family Erebidae that includes Catocala, or possibly in the Owlet Moth family Noctuidae.  At any rate, we do believe it can be classified in the superfamily Noctuoidea which includes both Erebidae and Noctuidae.  We will post your letter and photo and request assistance from our readership.

Karl provides another identification
August 15, 2010
Hi Daniel and Abhishek:
I am fairly certain that the genus is Dysgonia (Noctuidae: Catocalinae) but there are a number of species in India and many of them look similar. D. stuposa looks like a close match and it ranges though much of Asia (India to Japan and Indonesia). Regards. Karl.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination