Currently viewing the category: "Underwing Moths and Fruit Piercing Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: India
August 25, 2013 6:01 pm
I want to know about this creature..
Signature: Self

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear Self,
This is a Fruit Piercing Moth,
Eudocima materna, and we found matching photos on FlickR and Wikimedia Commons.  The moths have a proboscis that is capable of piercing the skin of many types of fruit, enabling the moth to feed on the juice.  This habit ensures them a position as an agricultural pest in many parts of the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Prominent Moth
Location: Nth Burnett. Queensland Australia
December 4, 2012 2:09 am
Hi guys,
A first encounter with this big beautiful moth and so far no luck in a positive ID. It is possibly the Eucalyptus Prominent Moth but there are few photos of it on the net and none of them very good.
I have submitted an ID request with our CSIRO’s Living Atlas project but so far they can’t provide an ID. The moth is 50mm with a wingspan around 80mm. The abdomen is orange as are the hind wings.
I particularly love the blue bands on the palps. Any ideas anyone?
Signature: Aussietrev

Fruit Piercing Moth

Hi Trevor,
If you ever determine the species of this comely Prominent Moth, please let us know.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist as well.

Fruit Piercing Moth

Update:  Eudocima fullonia
Thanks to a comment from Trevor, we now know that this is a Fruit Piercing Moth, Eudocima fullonia, and it is profiled on Butterfly House.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this insect
Location: California
October 10, 2012 8:31 pm
so i got this insect here in California in a park i am not pretty sure what it is called but i need to know its name for my insect collection project for my little nephew
Signature: Me

Underwing

Dear Me,
Though you did not provide much information, we want to inform you that it is illegal to collect insects in state parks without a permit.  This appears to be some species of Underwing Moth, possibly in the genus
Catocala, but we are not familiar with the ventral markings to be able to provide more than that.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Drasteria moth?
Location: Solano County, CA
July 7, 2012 7:07 pm
flew into my living room. Drasteria seemed the closest, but I couldn’t find any with that bright orange color.
Signature: me

Underwing Moth

This beautiful moth is one of the Underwing Moths in the genus Catocala, and according to the map on Bill Oehlke’s website, at least 7 different species have been documented from Solano County.  We do not have the necessary skills to take this identification to the species level.  Underwing Moths get their name from the brightly colored underwings that are only revealed when the moth is in flight.  When the moth is resting, it is easily camouflaged against bark or other surfaces which allows it to escape predation because the hunter is expecting to find something with brighter coloration after pursuing the flying moth.  If you are interested in learning more about local moths, you might want to see if there is a National Moth Week event near you.


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Underwing Moth resting on mossy bark
Location: SE Michigan
September 24, 2011 6:52 pm
Hello, Bugman: Spotted this large underwing moth flying around eratically during the afternoon; was surprised both by it’s size and that it was flying during a sunny afternoon. Not sure which of the many kinds of Underwings this one is, but it was about 2.5 inches across. It landed on a tree, hoping to ”blend-in” with it’s cryptic patterning. I was able to get 2 nice close-ups, before it fluttered away. Thought you might like to add this shot to your Underwing info.
Signature: Chris O.

Underwing

Hi Chris,
Thanks so much for sending your photo of an Underwing Moth.  We posted another photo earlier today and we wrote about the camouflage ability of the Underwing Moths.  Though your mossy trunk does not effectively hide this individual, our readers should be able to imagine it blending in on a lighter barked tree.  While we don’t believe the Underwing has the ability to choose a tree that will effectively hide it, we do believe that those moths that blend into the trees in a specific area will survive and then subsequently pass on the traits that determine their coloration to their offspring.  Your description of the Underwing flying during daylight hours is very accurate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Two differnt butterflies
Location: eastern, canada
September 24, 2011 8:26 am
There is two different type of butterflies and I don’t know what is type is.
Signature: M.o

Underwing

Dear M.o,
You have mistaken an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala for a butterfly.  Underwing Moths usually have forewings that are patterned like tree bark.  When the Underwing Moth rests on the trunk of a tree, it is perfectly camouflaged, and when it flies, its brightly colored underwings present a flashy appearance.  A predator will be fooled once a flying moth comes to rest hiding the brightly colored underwings.  Your other butterfly is a Red Admiral.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination