Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect I.D Needed
Geographic location of the bug:  Chiangmai Province, Thailand
Date: 02/14/2018
Time: 04:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman,
I found this insect walking along some gravel on the side of the road.  It appeared to be injured and it could not fly.  Could you please help me identify this species.
Sincerely,
How you want your letter signed:  Myles Davis

Tiger Moth: Amata sperbius

Dear Myles,
This beautiful wasp-mimic, diurnal Tiger Moth is
Amata sperbius based on the resemblance of your individual to those pictured on iNaturalist and on FlickR.  Perhaps it is recently eclosed and its wings are not yet capable of flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this thing?!
Geographic location of the bug:  St Pete Florida
Date: 02/04/2018
Time: 09:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey guys,
This thing was on the exterior wall of a building. Can you tell me what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Michael,
Is there an oleander shrub nearby?  Though it looks like a wasp, this is actually a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird bug on fence
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 01/25/2018
Time: 07:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! So I found this big guy on my fence. I’ve never seen anything like it before. The top half looks like an owlet moth….I’m not sure what the bottom half looks like. I’ve tried doing searches, but I can’t find anything. Even tried to search for the life cycle of the owlet, but that doesn’t yield anything, either. It was about 2″ long and about as big around as a pinky finger. It stayed on the fence nearly all day.
How you want your letter signed:  Cher Lewis

Newly Eclosed Eyed Tiger Moth

Dear Cher,
This is a newly eclosed Eyed Tiger Moth or Giant Leopard Moth.  Eclosion is the process of emerging from the pupal state, so this individual’s wings have not yet expanded allowing it to fly, a process that might take several additional hours.  Insects are most vulnerable during the process of metamorphosis.

Newly Eclosed Eyed Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Tiger Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  South-East Queensland
Date: 01/14/2018
Time: 11:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, my girlfriend found this moth attracted to a light in south east queensland, about 1 hour both west of the coast and South of Brisbane. It’s possible tiger moth though we do not know that species.
How you want your letter signed:  Jayden Waters

Donovan’s Tiger Moth

Dear Jayden,
You are correct that this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  Thanks to the excellent images and archives on Butterfly House, we were able to identify your moth as Donovan’s Tiger Moth,
Aloa marginata.  Donovan’s Tiger Moth is also pictured on iNaturalist and the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “The moth is white in colour, with two black lines on each forewing. There is the black and orange line along the edge of each forewing as well. Its abdomen is orange-red in colour with black spots on each segment.”  

Donovan’s Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth butterfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Winklespruit
Date: 01/05/2018
Time: 11:53 AM EDT
I spotted about 20 of these on a lawn. Some of them were mating and the rest were very lethargic
How you want your letter signed:  Trish

Pleasant Hornet Moth

Dear Trish,
First we must congratulate you on recognizing that though it resembles a hornet or wasp, this is actually a moth.  We believe, thanks to Blue Gnu, that is is a Pleasant Hornet Moth,
Euchromia amoena, and the site states:  “The Pleasant Hornet is actually a form of moth that flies in the day.  It is a beautiful insect that will be found congregating on plants that have a lot of pollen. It tends to favour whitish flowers.  The preferred habitat of the Pleasant Hornet is subtropical forests and bushveld near to the coast.”  We have a similar look, but differently marked individual on our site already identified as Euchromia amoena, so we acknowledge that one might be incorrect, or there might be individual color variation, but we are confident that both postings are the same genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Determination request
Geographic location of the bug:  Thailand inthanon national parc
Date: 01/02/2018
Time: 04:07 PM EDT
Hi Bugman,
I’m searching for more than 3 months to identify a bug, also used your site, but still not convinced that I’ve found it.
I’m thinking of Amata Grotei. but can’t find extra scientific information about it.
Here a similar picture I’ve found, but the wings are different (http://www.thaibugs.com/wp-content/gallery/syntominae/IMG_7693.jpg)
Another one can be Amata grotei, colors are different, but the wing matches perfectly. (maybe the color differences are between male or female )
https://www.flickr.com/photos/beautiful_bugs/24751620053/in/photostream/
Or the ceryx amaon 4 can also be the one (http://www.thaibugs.com/?page_id=210) at the bottom of the page.
Or perhaps it’s a Sessiidae Clear-wing Wasp Moth
Hope you can help me out here!
Thank you very much in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Mr Ronald

Wasp Moth

Dear Mr Ronald,
The best we are able to provide for you at this time is a general identification.  This is a Wasp Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We found a mating pair from China pictured on FlickR, but alas, only the general identification is provided.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide better information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination