Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Horned Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Indonesia (?)
Date: 10/20/2017
Time: 06:06 AM EDT
Stumbled on this on facebook, wondering what this moth is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thomas

Creatonotos gangis: Tiger Moth displaying Coremata

Dear Thomas,
Early this year we received an image of a similar looking Tiger Moth, also from Indonesia, and Arctiid expert Julian Donahue informed us:  “the widespread Asian
Creatonotos transiens displaying his coremata (androconia are specialized scent scales usually confined to the wings).  You can see images here:  https://hiveminer.com/Tags/creatonotostransiens/Recent and also if you Google the congeneric Creatonotos gangis you will see images of similar coremata.”  Based on this Real Monstrosities image, we believe your species is the latter one.  That site states:  “Creatonotos is a genus containing about 10 species of moth found in parts of Africa, southeast Asia and Australia. Two species are particularly widespread and well known: C. transiens with their pale, orange abdomen and wings entirely white save for a few carefully-placed, black dots, and the more dramatic C. gangis. Their abdomens are red and they have lovely black stripes on their wings, as if someone was testing a brush before practising some Chinese calligraphy.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth Geometry
Geographic location of the bug:  Boquete, Panama
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 08:29 PM EDT
The markings on this moth look vaguely hieroglyphical.
How you want your letter signed:  Nora

Tussock Moth

Dear Nora,
We are certain this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We found these images from the genus
Halysidota on the Kirby Wolfe Costa Rica Tiger Moths page, and though they are not exact, they are quite similar.  It really resembles its North American relative the Banded Tussock Moth, Halysidota tessellaris. 

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Subject:  Orange and Black Beetle-Like Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Boquete, Panama
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 07:35 PM EDT
A friend refuses to believe this is a moth, but I’m sure it is. What species?
How you want your letter signed:  Nora

Possibly Lichen Moth

Dear Nora,
Thanks for resending this image as a unique request.  The one beetle this really resembles is the moth-mimic Banded Net-Winged Beetle, but the legs, antennae and wing veins are quite different.   like you, we are inclined to believe this is a moth.  In our opinion, it resembles a Lichen Moth, but we could not locate any similar looking species on Kirby Wolf’s Costa Rica Tiger Moths page.  We also considered it might be a Leaf Skeletonizer Moth in the family Zygaenidae, but again, we could not locate any matching images.  We are going to contact Julian Donahue to get his opinion, and we would also enlist the assistance of our readership with this identification.

Update: While attempting to identify another Tiger Moth, we found Correbidia germana on FlickR and we are quite confident it is your orange and black moth.  According to Panama Insects:  “This moth, and several similar-looking species illustrated in this gallery, are nearly always present at lights in various abundance. They all, to one degree ot another, appear to mimic beetles in the family Lycidae that are present on Isla Colon.”

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Subject:  Moth in Tuscany
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Siena, Tuscany, Italy
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 11:42 AM EDT
Grateful if you could ID this moth found this morning. Thanks in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Bob

Discrete Chaperon

Dear Bob,
This is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We will attempt to provide you with a species identification.

Thanks, Daniel.  I did suspect a Tiger but can’t narrow it down any further.  I hope you are more able!
Best regards,
Bob.

Karl Provides an Identification
Hello Daniel and Bob:
It looks like a Discrete Chaperon (Erebidae: Arctiinae: Cymbalophora pudica). It is a variable species but on the whole it looks like a close match. Regards Karl

Thanks to you both.  Have copied you on a tweet.
Best,
Bob.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Costa Rica Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Guanacaste Costa Rica
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 06:03 PM EDT
Hola, Found this little one with my son sitting on the ground outside one night. Would love if you could identify it for us. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Brian and Mathias

Saucy Beauty

Dear Brian and Mathias,
We are pretty confident this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and we also believe it is most likely a diurnal species, but alas, we were having trouble finding a matching image.  We were about to give up when we found the Saucy Beauty,
Phaloesia saucia, posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the range is:  “Three southmost counties of Texas / south to Venezuela.”

Aloha,
Wow, thanks for this! My son is going to be very excited to learn this. Thanks a lot for your help
Brian McQuay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identity of Two Winged Bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Thailand
Date: 09/15/2017
Time: 01:36 AM EDT
Salutations! Can you possibly identify these fabulous bugs?
I can’t find anything on them. Some are exquisite, some terrifying, but all are utterly rivetting! Thank you very much. I’m sending a few others, too.
How you want your letter signed:  Suzanne Jamsrisai

Mating Tiger Moths

Dear Suzanne,
These mating Tiger Moths are excellent wasp mimics.  We found a FlickR posting that looks like your species and it is identified as
Amata sperbiusINaturalist has numerous Asian sightings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination