Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
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Two insects – not sure what class or?
Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 3:20 PM
I am sending two photographs of insects I have seen here in Costa Rica but each one only once. I’m not even sure whether I am dealing with bugs, beetles, or? I want to post the photos to a site trying to build a world insect identification guide, but can’t post until I know what I’m posting. The long silvery insect is quite lovely, I think. The other was a photo taken with a flash at night in the rain as I was getting off a bus in San Vito, Costa Rica. The yellow, black, white, and I think blue insect could be a beetle but . . . Definitely rural or forest insects to be found in the highlands of southern Costa Rica.
Mary B. Thorman
San Vito, Coto Brus, Costa Rica

Heiroglyphic Moth

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hi Mary,
The flash photo is of a Heiroglyphic Moth, Diphthera festiva, a species we have posted previously to What’s That Bug? and also found on the Featured Creatures website
.  The Heiroglyphic moth is an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae that is encountered in Florida as well as the tropical regions of Central America.  Your other insect is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We haven’t the time to research the exact species, but perhaps one of our readers will have the answer and submit a comment or a letter.

Unknown Costa Rican Cerambycid

Unknown Costa Rican Cerambycid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify, if possible
I’ve spent the last 2 hours trying to find this butterfly (or moth) at several different sites online…. including “What’s That Bug?” So far, I’ve not found it. Can you please identify it for me? As you can see, it is not very big. Thanks,
Donna Bryant,
East Texas

Hi Donna,
We did not recognize your moth, and we needed to do some research as well. We thought your specimen resembled an Eight Spotted Forrester, and we searched BugGuide for moths in that subfamily, Agaristinae. We quickly found your moth, Psychomorpha epimenis, Grapevine Epimenis, on BugGuide, which indicates: “larvae feed on the leaves of grape, family Vitaceae. Adults nectar on early spring blooming plums, cherries, and redbuds. ” We suspect the pollination to the fruit trees offsets any leaf damage caused by the caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

For nearly a week, this pretty green moth was hanging out on the screen of our front door where it was attracted to the porch light at our Mt Washington, Los Angeles offices. We finally took a photo but did not have the time to properly identify it as your own queries have kept us so busy. Today we discovered that it is Feralia februalis, a relative of the Deceptive Sallow. The caterpillars feed on oak, and our own California Live Oak planted from an acorn eight years ago if about 15 feet tall now, so we are guessing this moth had either been a caterpillar on our tree, of was considering the tree to be a good place to lay eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Yellow, black, and white moth
Hi,
Can you tell me what this bug is? I have looked at all the moth pages on your site and couldn’t id it. I assume it is a moth, but have never seen it before. I found it on my screen door in Columbia, SC. Thanks,
Sarah

Hi Sarah,
This detailed beauty is known as a Heiroglyphic Moth, Diphthera festiva. There are some wonderful images on the Moth Photographers Group website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mystery lepidopteran (?)
Dear Friends,
I had two of these chasing each other in my backyard in broad daylight. Took photos that show the huge round white spots on black wings, the cream colored “neck-warmer” area, and the extraordinary orange that fringes the upper parts of at least some of the legs. Have gone through butterfly books repeatedly, and can’t find anything remotely similar. So is it a moth, and if so, what kind? Many, many thanks for your attention and help,
Henry Schneiderman
Bloomfield CT

Hi Henry,
The Audubon Guide identifies your moth as an Eight Spotted Forrester, Alypia octomaculata. This diurnal Owlet Moth is often confused for a butterfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unidentified butterfly or moth
I was photographing butterflies in August here in eastern Nebraska and ran across this little fellow. I can’t seem to identify it from my butterfly reference books, so perhaps it is a moth. As you will note from the photo, it appears to gather pollen on it’s legs, like a bumblebee. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks!
Doug Wulf

Hi Doug,
The pretty little Eight Spotted Forester, Alypia octomaculata, is a day flying moth that is often mistaken for a butterfly. That is not pollen on the legs, but brilliant orange hairlike scales. Caterpillars feed on Virginia Creepers, grape and Boston ivy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination