Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
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Tiger Moth?
Location:  Coastal SC
September 2, 2010 10:40 pm
I’ve looked thru WhatsThatBug.com’s Tiger Moth section, and think that this might be a Tiger Moth? But not sure what type. We live near Myrtle Beach, SC, and found this little guy right on our front porch this afternoon. And right above the front door was a baby mantis. We had a little Wild Kingdom going on. I just love days like that, when they show up right on your front porch, just begging to have their picture taken!
Signature:  Lisa

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hi Lisa,
Your Heiroglphic Moth looks lovely on that buff wood surface.  It is a Noctuid.

Daniel,
Thank you so much for identifying our moth! I have some other photos of it I thought I’d share, as well as the mantis I mentioned. Maybe it wasn’t a baby after all, but a small variety?
I have many other photos of interesting creatures we have found over the last few years, including a very large Carolina Wolf Spider we found last year, an Eastern Hercules Beetle, a beautiful Pearl Crescent Butterfly, a Tersa Sphinx Moth, a Plume moth, a Spittlebug, and a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, if you’re interested in seeing any of those.
Thanks again! You made my day! 🙂
Lisa M. Nowakowski

Hi Lisa,
Though we always enjoy seeing the images our readers supply, it is just physically impossible to post all the wonderful images we receive.  Probably, of the list you mentioned, the one we would most like to have another fine photograph of is the Carolina Wolf Spider.  Please include that name in the subject line of the email you send us and please use our standard form including all required information.

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What Larvae is This?
June 10, 2010
I’d like to know what moth or butterfly caterpillar this is. It’s on a grape vine and is a little over an inch long.
Jayne Wilson
Houston area, Texas

Probably Eight Spotted Forrester Caterpillar

Hi Jayne,
We know we have seen images of this Moth Caterpillar in the past, but we cannot recall what it is.  It superficially resembles the caterpillars of the Grape Leaf Skeletonizers in the genus Harrisina pictured on BugGuide, but that is not a correct identification.  We are going to post your photo and letter and we hope that our readership can assist in the identification.  Though your photograph is quite lovely the way you have composed it, we cropped it to more closely concentrate on the caterpillar.

Thanks for the response, Daniel. I’ll check back to see if anyone has more info.
Jayne

Karl provides some information
Hi Daniel and Jayne:
This caterpillar probably looks familiar to you because it looks similar to several that have been posted on WTB before. It looks a lot like a Fruit-Piercing Moth (Noctuidae) in the genus Gonodonta, but all the white hairs on the body suggest it is likely another Noctuid, a day-flying Forester Moth in the genus Alypia. Many of these moth caterpillars look quite similar and the head and tail regions are not visible in Jayne’s photo, but I think it is likely an Eight-Spotted Forester (Alypia octomaculata), previously posted by Laura in 2007. You can use the WTB search function to also find numerous images of adults. There are many good caterpillar images on the internet, like this one on pbase. Eight-Spotted Forester caterpillars feed on grapes and Virginia Creeper. I can’t say for certain that that is the genus, but that I am pretty sure that Alypia is the correct genus. Regards.
Karl

Now I’ve had a chance to look at photos of the moth — I think I can confirm that it is an Eight Spotted Forester.  I remember seeing what I took to be a black butterfly with white spots on the Star Jasmine a month or so back.  It looked exactly like the photos I found online.
Thanks, Jayne

Jayne provides photos of imago Eight Spotted Forrester
June 11, 2010
I’m attaching some photos that I took at the end of May that I thought were of butterflies.  Now I know they were Eight-Spotted Forester Moths.
Thanks for posting my original caterpillar photo, and to Karl for providing more information.
Jayne Wilson

Eight Spotted Forrester

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yellow and black about 1 inch long and an inch high
June 5, 2010
Insect found by the swamp in gueydan, la. 70542. south of lake arthur lake . Vermillion parish.
B
gueydan la. 70542

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hi B,
Because of the markings on its wings, this Owlet Moth, Diphthera festiva, is commonly called a Heiroglyphic Moth.  You can read extensively about the Heiroglyphic Moth on the Featured Creatures website.

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What’s this moth?
May 27, 2010
This handsome creature was hanging around our grapevines the other day (May 24, to be exact). It was maybe an inch nose to wingtip, not counting the antennae. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks.
Linda C
Accomack County, VA

Eight Spotted Forrester

Dear Linda,
Your Eight Spotted Forrester really is a beautiful moth. The caterpillars feed on the leaves of a few different vines, including grape.  You can read more about this diurnal Owlet Moth on BugGuide.

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Thought it was bird poo at first…
May 9, 2010
Dear Bugman,
I found this interesting moth today on the deck around my mother-in-law’s pool. I probably would have dismissed it as bird droppings, had there not been other moths in the area. Interesting defense mechanism, I assume?
Cassie Shaw
Cleveland, MS

Beautiful Wood Nymph

Dear Cassie,
WE are very happy that we took the time to look at our old mail dating from a brief trip to Ohio.  Your well camouflaged moth is a Beautiful Wood Nymph, Eudryas grata, which can be distinguished from its close relative, the Pearly Wood Nymph, Eudryas unio, because it is:  “larger than Pearly Wood-Nymph (E. unio), and the dark band along outer margin of forewing is smoothly curved on the inside, not scalloped as in E. unio
” according to BugGuide.

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Showy Desert Moth Takes a Siesta.
April 5, 2010
We were wandering through a carpet of yellow tackstem flowers. It was cold and windy when me wife looked down and spotted this moth hunkered down in one of the flowers. We were impressed with the sharp red lines on the wings and the crazy Afro harido…..It showed no signs of activity. Hope you have more of a clue about this character then we did. I submitted this before but didn’t put in my name and the date; please use this submission
Richard Potashin, Independence, CA
Owens Valley, Eastern California, 4000′ ft.

Owlet Moth: maybe Heliolonche pictipennis

Hi Richard,
We vowed we would not give up until we identified this moth, and we started going dizzy sorting through all the plates on the Moth Photographers Group website before we landed on an Owlet Moth plate where Heliolonche pictipennis looked like a good bet.  The images on BugGuide support that possibility.  Schinia pulchripennis, also pictured on the Moth Photographers Group website also looks close, and that is substantiated on BugGuide, though BugGuide also has one image of  Schinia sueta that is a very close match.  We really believe this takes more of an expert than our amateur status can provide, though we are confident that the Subfamily Heliothinae of the Owlet Moths which is well represented on BugGuide contains your individual.  Our money would be on Heliolonche pictipennis.

Owlet Moth: maybe Heliolonche pictipennis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination