Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Budworm Moth caught laying eggs on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/12/2018
Time: 07:32 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Yesterday I noticed the bane of all home Cannabis gardeners, about eight tiny Budworms, Chloridea virescens, crawling on the righteous colas of My Woody Plant as well as on Abel’s Indica #1.  They were tiny Budworms, probably just hatched, and they didn’t have time to bore into the buds where they begin eating, leaving a shit-filled shell of a bud as they grow.  This morning I found a few more tiny Budworms on the same two plants, and horror of horrors, two buds with signs of a feeding Budworm, the brown and dead florets, and sure enough, larger Budworms were feeding on some swelling buds.  I wrote to Mel Frank and he wrote back that it wasn’t too late to spray Bt, so I started spraying about 6:30 this evening.  It was a beautiful night sky with a sickle Moon, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars all visible just past sunset.  When I began spraying the Purple Fire clone, I saw a moth fly out of the interior of the plant and I missed it with my hand, and I watched it fly toward the plants I had just sprayed.  I had a second chance to catch it and missed, so I got a fish net and caught it on the third try.  I kind of mangled it in the process, but I am certain what I was watching was the Budworm Moth flying from cola to cola laying eggs, which probably explains why I would only find one Budworm per bud.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Tobacco Budworm Moth

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thank you ever so much for providing us with your harrowing gardening experience.  It sounds quite stressful.  BugGuide has no information on the Tobacco Budworm feeding on
Cannabis, but it does state the larval foods are “Cotton, tobacco, roses, ground cherries, soybean, and many others” and “Caterpillars feed on buds, flowers, fruits, and seeds, making them an agricultural crop pest.”  We did locate a Springer Link essay “Flight activity of Heliothis virescens (F.) females (Lepidoptera:  Noctuidae) with reference to host-plant volatiles” that states:  “Many phytophagous insects use airborne volatiles emitted from plants to locate their hosts.  The recent development of bioassay systems for studying host-plant finding and ovipositional behavior under controlled environmental conditions in the laboratory has intensified interest in characterization of the specific behaviors regulated by volatile emissions from plants and identification of the active compounds.”  Again, alas, Cannabis in not mentioned.  Do the plants in question produce odiferous airborne emissions?

Tobacco Budworm Moth

Dear Bugman,
Thanks for all that information.  The buds on my plants do smell quite dank.  I keep finding Budworm Eggs, but luckily, not much bud damage.  Here is an image of one of the dreaded Budworm Eggs.  Harvest is near.
Constant Gardener

Budworm Egg

Mel Frank Comments:
Tobacco budworm moth is brown with 3 Chevron markings on wings.i believe they are attracted by terpene fragrances which become prominent during flowering, increasing as they mature. Rarely see them in beginning flowering. Once flowers begin smelling you must spray more often than every two weeks.12 days early and once a week flowering.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Durbanville Hills, South Africa
Date: 09/08/2018
Time: 06:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good day. I came across this beautiful moth at a wedding venue yesterday. About 3cm in length (rough estimate). Any idea how to identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Francois

Hi
I managed to ID it myself after submitting. It is “Diaphone eumela”, the Cherry Spot.
Thanks!
F

Cherry Spot

Dear Francois,
Thank you for submitting your image of the lovely Cherry Spot, for identifying it and for writing back to us with your identification.  The species is well represented on African Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink and yellow moth
Geographic location of the bug:  North Central NM
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 01:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I found this moth and have not been able to identify it! It’s the end of summer which is our monsoon season and it was hanging out under our patio. It’s about the size of a nickel. It’s so cute!
How you want your letter signed:  Acuriousmom

Owlet Moth

Dear Acuriousmom,
We have two individuals of this very pretty Owlet Moth,
Psectrotarsia suavis, in our archive that are listed as Pink Spotted Flower Moths, but the only real references we are able to locate that uses that common name are on our site and on a link on a BugGuide page to the Primrose Moth, so we don’t believe the common name Pink Spotted Flower Moth is truly recognized since neither BugGuide nor the Moth Photographers Group uses that name, despite its appropriateness.  The only appropriate name for this beautiful moth would seem to be the more general family name Owlet Moth.  Another curiosity is that BugGuide notes:  “The larval host is unknown” so we don’t know what it eats.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Indian Head Dress Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Wayne NJ
Date: 06/28/2018
Time: 03:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hi,
found this on my front window after a rain storm.
Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  na

Pearly Wood Nymph

Dear na,
This is a Pearly Wood Nymph,
Eudryas unio, (see BugGuide) which can be distinguished from the very similar looking Beautiful Wood Nymph, according to BugGuide, because the “dark band along outer margin of forewing is scalloped on the inside, not smoothly curved.”  We are amused that you described this Pearly Wood Nymph as an “Indian Head Dress Moth” because our readers have often observed that they resemble bird droppings, and we agree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Melipotis indomita – Indomitable Melipotis Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern tip of Big Island, Hawaii
Date: 04/21/2018
Time: 08:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Aloha Daniel,
A couple of moth photos, different moths, different times, but similar location at the northern end of the Big Island, Hawaii. I think they’re male and female Melipotis indomita – Indomitable Melipotis Moth. BugGuide (https://bugguide.net/node/view/92670) shows similar male and female markings in their identification. Also found a photo from the Big Island (https://www.flickr.com/photos/36088296@N08/19819511964/in/pool-hawaii-insect-id/) that’s identified as this moth (looks like a male). Checking your site I didn’t find any Melipotis indomita to compare. So I’m punting this your way to see if you agree with the identification and to possibly add new moth photos to your vast treasure trove.
Mahalo, Graham
How you want your letter signed:  Graham

Indomitable Melipotis (male)

Dear Graham,
We are sorry for the delay.  We wanted to more thoroughly research your very well prepared submission and we got busy.  According to Pacific Northwest Moths (which pictures an individual from Maui):  “It is sexually dimorphic. The male forewing ground color is somewhat variable, usually dark brownish gray with a blue gray terminal area. A prominent pale brownish white mark borders the oblique antemedial line and extends sligthly beyond the thin median line. The postmedial line balloons laterally near the black reniform spot and this portion of the line is also filled with brownish white. A black bar is present in the cell proximal to the reniform spot, and a small black spot is present at the apex. The hindwing is brownish off-white, with a broad dark gray marginal band that is interrupted by white near the cubital vein. The hindwing fringe is pure white with a black segment midway between the anterior margin and the anal angle. The female is similar but the base of the wing is gray followed by rusty brown. The head and thorax of both sexes are gray. The antenna is simple, ciliate in males.  This rare migrant can be recognized by the sharply defined oblique mark with straight borders across the forewing in association with a black and brownish off-white hindwing.”  BugGuide has images of male and female and they seem in agreement with your own identification but no Hawaii sightings are mentioned.  Hawaiiscape does picture it and list it as a defoliator of Monkeypod trees.

Indomitable Melipotis (female)

Hi Daniel,
No worries about any delay (I should be the one apologizing for being slow to respond here). I’m always appreciative of the work you do and thank you for the great amount of information on this moth. I’ll probably post at least some of this info on my blog (grahamsisland.com) if that’s OK with you – with a link to your site of course, though I’m not exactly overrun with followers.
Mahalo, Graham

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Louisiana
Date: 02/25/2018
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been trying to figure out what kind of moth this is and it’s driving me crazy
How you want your letter signed:  Don’t know what this means

Wood Nymph Moth

This is one of the Wood Nymph moths in the genus Eudryas, and it is believed they mimic bird droppings as a means of camouflage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination