Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth from south fl
Geographic location of the bug:  Found on a window in S Florida
Date: 05/10/2019
Time: 01:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could not identify my moth in my Audubon Field Guide, thought you might know .
How you want your letter signed:  Laura Rice

Spanish Moth

Dear Laura,
We remember having to identify this pretty little moth in the past, and that it took us considerable time because we thought we were trying to identify a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We did remember that it was actually an Owlet Moth, and when we began to attempt an identification, we quickly found the Spanish Moth,
Xanthopastis timais, on Featured Creatures where it states that it is:  “is unmistakable for any other moth in Florida.”  The site also states:  “The Spanish moth, originally described from Surinam, is found throughout lowland areas of South and Central America, and in the Caribbean. The Spanish moth occurs throughout all lowland Neotropical regions of the Caribbean, and as far south as northern Argentina. In North America, the species has a southeastern distribution, from the Carolinas to Texas, but strays northward along the Atlantic Coast as far as coastal New York, and inland as far north as Kentucky and Arkansas. It occurs in all of Florida.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subjec:  Who is she?
Geographic location of the bug:  Townsville, QLD
Date: 01/28/2019
Time: 12:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Today I met this fashionable individual while taking shelter from the summer rain. Do you know their name?
How you want your letter signed:  Gabby

Grapevine Moth

Dear Gabby,
This is a Grapevine Moth and we identified it on Butterfly House where it is classified in the subfamily Agaristinae, called Day Flying Moths or Whistling Moths, in the family Noctuidae, the Owlet Moth.  According to Butterfly House:  “The adult is a day-flying moth, with a wingspan of up to 5 cm. The wings are black with striking white bands on the forewings, and a white outer margin on the hindwings. The abdomen is black on top and has orange stripes underneath.  The body has tufts of bright red hair on the tip of the abdomen, and at the bases of the legs. These red hairs project and are visible from above. The adults are gregarious, feed on nectar and live for 2-3 weeks. They had a characteristic fluttering flight and can ascend to 25 m or more. Their overall sex ratio is about 1:1. The adult males have anterior brush organs on which are secreted chemicals thought to be pheromones.”  There is a nice image on Alamy and according to Project Noah:  “A Noctuid moth endemic to the south-eastern part of Australia and is now an invasive species in many other parts of the world. In 1862 the Indian Myna (
Acridotheres tristis) was introduced into Australia to control the Grapevine Moth. The bird is now considered a pest and Grapvine moths are common. I watched a female for ten minutes – first seeking the location of a vine – second happy she was near one she just started releasing eggs; one every 30 seconds while fluttering her wings – third the eggs just fell to the ground around the base of the vine. Over the next few days I noticed scores of tiny caterpillars climbing slowly up the supporting posts. Near enough was good enough I guess.”    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Budworm Moth caught laying eggs on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/12/2018
Time: 07:32 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Yesterday I noticed the bane of all home Cannabis gardeners, about eight tiny Budworms, Chloridea virescens, crawling on the righteous colas of My Woody Plant as well as on Abel’s Indica #1.  They were tiny Budworms, probably just hatched, and they didn’t have time to bore into the buds where they begin eating, leaving a shit-filled shell of a bud as they grow.  This morning I found a few more tiny Budworms on the same two plants, and horror of horrors, two buds with signs of a feeding Budworm, the brown and dead florets, and sure enough, larger Budworms were feeding on some swelling buds.  I wrote to Mel Frank and he wrote back that it wasn’t too late to spray Bt, so I started spraying about 6:30 this evening.  It was a beautiful night sky with a sickle Moon, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars all visible just past sunset.  When I began spraying the Purple Fire clone, I saw a moth fly out of the interior of the plant and I missed it with my hand, and I watched it fly toward the plants I had just sprayed.  I had a second chance to catch it and missed, so I got a fish net and caught it on the third try.  I kind of mangled it in the process, but I am certain what I was watching was the Budworm Moth flying from cola to cola laying eggs, which probably explains why I would only find one Budworm per bud.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Tobacco Budworm Moth

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thank you ever so much for providing us with your harrowing gardening experience.  It sounds quite stressful.  BugGuide has no information on the Tobacco Budworm feeding on
Cannabis, but it does state the larval foods are “Cotton, tobacco, roses, ground cherries, soybean, and many others” and “Caterpillars feed on buds, flowers, fruits, and seeds, making them an agricultural crop pest.”  We did locate a Springer Link essay “Flight activity of Heliothis virescens (F.) females (Lepidoptera:  Noctuidae) with reference to host-plant volatiles” that states:  “Many phytophagous insects use airborne volatiles emitted from plants to locate their hosts.  The recent development of bioassay systems for studying host-plant finding and ovipositional behavior under controlled environmental conditions in the laboratory has intensified interest in characterization of the specific behaviors regulated by volatile emissions from plants and identification of the active compounds.”  Again, alas, Cannabis in not mentioned.  Do the plants in question produce odiferous airborne emissions?

Tobacco Budworm Moth

Dear Bugman,
Thanks for all that information.  The buds on my plants do smell quite dank.  I keep finding Budworm Eggs, but luckily, not much bud damage.  Here is an image of one of the dreaded Budworm Eggs.  Harvest is near.
Constant Gardener

Budworm Egg

Mel Frank Comments:
Tobacco budworm moth is brown with 3 Chevron markings on wings.i believe they are attracted by terpene fragrances which become prominent during flowering, increasing as they mature. Rarely see them in beginning flowering. Once flowers begin smelling you must spray more often than every two weeks.12 days early and once a week flowering.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Durbanville Hills, South Africa
Date: 09/08/2018
Time: 06:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good day. I came across this beautiful moth at a wedding venue yesterday. About 3cm in length (rough estimate). Any idea how to identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Francois

Hi
I managed to ID it myself after submitting. It is “Diaphone eumela”, the Cherry Spot.
Thanks!
F

Cherry Spot

Dear Francois,
Thank you for submitting your image of the lovely Cherry Spot, for identifying it and for writing back to us with your identification.  The species is well represented on African Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink and yellow moth
Geographic location of the bug:  North Central NM
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 01:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I found this moth and have not been able to identify it! It’s the end of summer which is our monsoon season and it was hanging out under our patio. It’s about the size of a nickel. It’s so cute!
How you want your letter signed:  Acuriousmom

Owlet Moth

Dear Acuriousmom,
We have two individuals of this very pretty Owlet Moth,
Psectrotarsia suavis, in our archive that are listed as Pink Spotted Flower Moths, but the only real references we are able to locate that uses that common name are on our site and on a link on a BugGuide page to the Primrose Moth, so we don’t believe the common name Pink Spotted Flower Moth is truly recognized since neither BugGuide nor the Moth Photographers Group uses that name, despite its appropriateness.  The only appropriate name for this beautiful moth would seem to be the more general family name Owlet Moth.  Another curiosity is that BugGuide notes:  “The larval host is unknown” so we don’t know what it eats.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Indian Head Dress Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Wayne NJ
Date: 06/28/2018
Time: 03:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hi,
found this on my front window after a rain storm.
Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  na

Pearly Wood Nymph

Dear na,
This is a Pearly Wood Nymph,
Eudryas unio, (see BugGuide) which can be distinguished from the very similar looking Beautiful Wood Nymph, according to BugGuide, because the “dark band along outer margin of forewing is scalloped on the inside, not smoothly curved.”  We are amused that you described this Pearly Wood Nymph as an “Indian Head Dress Moth” because our readers have often observed that they resemble bird droppings, and we agree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination