Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Histioea in Ecuador
Geographic location of the bug:  Archidona, Ecuador
Date: 08/28/2019
Time: 01:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have what appears to be a rare Histioea, but cannot identify it. These are seldom photographed from what I can tell. The observation is https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/19385404.
How you want your letter signed:  Trevor

Diurnal Tiger Moth: Histioea paulina

Hi Trevor,
We have several diurnal Tiger Moths in our archives identified as
Histioea meldolae, including this individual from Colombia and this individual from Costa Rica.  We will forward your image to Arctiid expert Julian Donahue to see what he can provide in the way of an identification.

Julian Donahue responds.
Hi Daniel,
This is a perfect match for the female of the euchromiine Histioea paulina Walker, 1866, as figured in Seitz, described from São Paulo, Brazil–a long way from Ecuador, but I don’t have any information on the distribution of the species.
Nice moth!
Julian

Thanks Daniel and Julian for the id! I will update inaturalist with the info. Much appreciated and very exciting!!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Carrboro NC
Date: 08/22/2019
Time: 04:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi all, love your website, and you always seem to find the answer! I found this rather bedraggled moth on a tree trunk. It was fairly large….like a Sphinx moth, but the head looks wrong for a Sphinx…and underwing of some sort? I couldn’t match it with any Sphinx that I knew.
How you want your letter signed:  Mothra

Probably Clouded Underwing

Dear Mothra,
We didn’t have high hopes for providing you with a species name, though we had confidence that this is an Underwing in the genus
Catocala.  We believe this BugGuide image of a Clouded Underwing, Catocala nebulosa, looks like it might be correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing Perch
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, California
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dearest Bugman,
It was lovely spending time with you during the almost full moon. Please enjoy this shot of you with a Walnut Underwing on your shoulder.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

The Bugman with a Walnut Underwing

Dear Melanie,
We are so happy you were able to get a cellular telephone image of Daniel as he removed the Walnut Underwing back to the outdoors after it entered the house Monday night.  After several minutes of eluding capture, luckily the moth alighted on Daniel’s shirt, and it could easily be walked outside.

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  East London
Date: 08/07/2019
Time: 05:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth was climbing up my window. Returned second night. Can you identify? I’ve searched unsuccessfully.
Photo of inside and outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Inez

Jersey Tiger

Dear Inez,
This pretty moth is a Jersey Tiger,
Euplagia quadripunctaria, and according to UK Moths:  “One of the most attractive of the Tiger moths, this species was until recently restricted in distribution to the Channel Islands and parts of the south coast .  On the mainland it is commonest in south Devon, but colonies have recently appeared in Dorset and the Isle of Wight, and it has also been found in other southern counties.  It now seems to be expanding its range quite quickly. There is also a thriving population in parts of London, but whether this is due to range expansion or the result of accidental introduction is still unclear.  It flies both in the daytime, when it can be found feeding on various flowers, as well as at night, when it is attracted to light.  The main flight period is July to September. The hairy larvae feed on a range of herbaceous plants including nettle (Urtica).”

Jersey Tiger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty catterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  CT
Date: 08/06/2019
Time: 06:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I love your site! You’ve been very helpful in the past and I’m hoping for another ID. I found these fellows on some milkweed in my yard. What can you tell me? Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar

Dear Jenn,
Many folks are planting milkweed to attract Monarch Butterflies, but there are in fact numerous insects that depend upon milkweed, hence our Milkweed Meadow tag which includes documentation of many insects associated with the plant.  This is a gorgeous image of a Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar,
Euchaetes egle.  See BugGuide for more information on the Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help needed to ID orange winged flying critter
Geographic location of the bug:  Atlantic Beach FL
Date: 07/30/2019
Time: 08:51 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband spotted this amorous couple on his early morning beach walk.Thanks to you who admire and respect all God’s creatures, great and small!
How you want your letter signed:  Lyvisky, Florida

Mating Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moths

Dear Lyvisky, Florida,
These are mating Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moths,
Empyreuma affinis, and they are harmless Tiger Moths that benefit from protective mimicry as they are easily mistaken for stinging wasps by predators.

Thank you, Daniel!! They do indeed resemble wasps. I’m always happy to meet new species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination