Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Nottingham
Date: 07/22/2018
Time: 04:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please can you tell me what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Elaine

Tiger Moth

Dear Elaine,
The nonspecific response is that this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and it is freshly eclosed which means it has recently emerged from its pupal stage and its wings have not yet fully expanded and hardened, which is making our ability to identify it more difficult.  It most closely resembles a Garden Tiger Moth,
Arctia caja, as pictured on UK Moths where it states:  “Another species which was a favourite with early collectors, who selectively bred it to create unusual colours and forms.  Once a quite common moth in most of Britain, it seems to have declined in many places in the last few years.  It flies in July and August, and will regularly visit the light-trap.”  We would even entertain the possibility that a modern breeder might be releasing some “unusual colours and forms” back into the wild in an effort to help remedy that they “have declined in many places in the last few years” but the markings on the thoracic region as well as the scalloped wing edge eliminate the Garden Tiger Moth as the proper identification.  The only other Tiger Moth profiled on UK Moths that it resembles is the Cream-Spot Tiger Moth, Arctia villica, but in that species, the spots are white on a dark ground while your moth has dark spots on a white ground.  We are going to contact Arctiid expert Julian Donahue to get his opinion.

Dear Daniel
Thank you for looking into the moth that I saw it will be interesting to hear what your expert has to say. The moth wasn’t really moving and I got very close to it and moved it on it’s stick to photograph, I expected it to fly away but it stayed in the same place.
Thanks.
Elaine
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Collins, CO
Date: 07/12/2018
Time: 03:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this last night putting out the dog around 1:30 am.  Never seen one that big ever.  Black Witch??
How you want your letter signed:  Mark

Black Witch

Dear Mark,
This is indeed a male Black Witch.  According to BugGuide:  “The northward June migration out of Mexico coincides with Mexico’s rainy season which typically starts in early June and lasts through October.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this wasp moth called
Geographic location of the bug:  The Southern Pacific coast of Costa Rica
Date: 06/30/2018
Time: 10:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’d love to know what species this wasp moth is. I took these photos.
How you want your letter signed:  Len Greene

Wasp Moth

Hi Len,
This Tiger Moth in the subtribe Euchromiina, the group commonly called Wasp Moth, has eluded us in terms of a species identification, but we believe based on this image on Revolvy representing the genus
Cyanopepla, and this image on Bold Systems that the genus Cyanopepla might be correct.  We will contact Arctiid expert Julian Donahue to get his opinion.  Your images are gorgeous.

Wasp Moth

Thank you for your response and compliment!  I’d love it if you’d keep me updated on any further identification of the genus.  I have more photos of unique and beautiful insects that I have photographed on my farm in Costa Rica that I’d be glad share with you if you’d like.
Pura Vida!

Julian Donahue provides an identification.
Hi Daniel,
This is Belemnia inaurata, presumably subspecies inaurata. Although Hampson treated it as an arctiid, it has been transferred to the Ctenuchina (now treated as a subtribe of the tribe Arctiini, subfamily Arctiinae of the family Erebidae–my ctenuchids don’t get any respect any more!)
This diurnal moth is frequently encountered in Costa Rica as it visits plants rich in pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), such Ageratum (which this plant may be, if it’s blue) and Eupatorium (the latter has been split into multiple genera, such as Conoclinium and Chromolaena, both of which I have in my butterfly & moth garden).
Nice pics. Thanks for the break from witnessing the cascading collapse of everything our nation stands for.
Julian

Ed. Note:  Here is an image of Belemnia inaurata from FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Indian Head Dress Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Wayne NJ
Date: 06/28/2018
Time: 03:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hi,
found this on my front window after a rain storm.
Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  na

Pearly Wood Nymph

Dear na,
This is a Pearly Wood Nymph,
Eudryas unio, (see BugGuide) which can be distinguished from the very similar looking Beautiful Wood Nymph, according to BugGuide, because the “dark band along outer margin of forewing is scalloped on the inside, not smoothly curved.”  We are amused that you described this Pearly Wood Nymph as an “Indian Head Dress Moth” because our readers have often observed that they resemble bird droppings, and we agree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ctenucha brunnea Photos
Geographic location of the bug:  Laguna Beach, California
Date: 06/20/2018
Time: 03:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
I came across your website while trying to identify the moth I saw today. I’m pretty sure it’s a  Ctenucha brunnea. I only saw one photo on your site so I figured I’d pass on my photos for your use.
Thanks for the great reference site!
How you want your letter signed:  Rachelle

Brown Ctenucha

Dear Rachelle,
Thanks so much for adding to our digital archives with your wonderful image of the Brown Ctenucha.  Our only image of this species dates back to 2006.  According to BugGuide, the range is “Coastal areas of central to southern California.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Leopard Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  St. Louis, MO
Date: 05/30/2018
Time: 04:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this giant leopard moth in my basement, May 29, 2018.  I don’t recall ever seeing one of these before, and in my research I discovered  some of the “wooly worms” I see in the fall turn into these beautiful moths.  A successful catch and release to get her back into the outdoors and on her way.
How you want your letter signed:  Cara

Giant Leopard Moth

Dear Cara,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful image of a Giant Leopard Moth.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site later in June while our editorial staff is away from the office on holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination