Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwestern NH
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 01:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen about 7am after a night of steady rain, the moth was attached to an outside house window screen, and about three feet from that one, another sitting on the plastic frame of the garden hose holder. July 23, 2019.
How you want your letter signed:  NH woodland area

Blinded Sphinx with Rain Drops

Your close-up image of the Sphinx Moth with rain drops is gorgeous.  We are happy you also sent more traditional dorsal views as we were able to identify it as Paonias excaecata a Blinded Sphinx, a common name that refers to the markings on the oceli on the underwings.  When the moth is threatened, it reveals the underwings which creates the illusion of a pair of eyes startling a predator into perceiving that it might have awakened a sleeping giant.  Because those markings include a light blue center dot, rather than a black pupil found on the oceli of many other species of “eyed moths”, the Blinded Sphinx appears to have cataracts.  In searching for Sphingidae of the Americas, we encountered a new [to us] site Sphingidae of the United States of America where it states:  “This species seems to only fly in the warmer months in the Northeast, and even in Florida, it doesn’t seem to be recorded from December to March. This species is extremely common at lights, and both sexes are attracted to light. It does not feed as an adult. The adults do have a fairly large size difference, with females being much larger and rounder than males.”  After that internet detour, we returned to Sphingidae of the Americas to get the information “Males demonstrate a strong curve to the abdomen” so we could inform you that both of your moths are males.

Blinded Sphinx

Awesome!
I researched your page and guessed a Blind Sphinx. Thank you for confirming. This encounter, with these two beauties has peaked my interest, and I’ll now be on the look out for others.
Enjoy the rain drop photo. I did take it myself with an iPhone 8 Plus. You may use it if you want on your page.
Happy week,
Nan

Blinded Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large moth with impressive camouflage
Geographic location of the bug:  CT
Date: 07/14/2019
Time: 08:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this beautiful fellow in our mudroom. He has tree bark or dead leaf like camouflage. What is he/she? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Jenn

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Jenn,
This impressive moth is commonly called a Blinded Sphinx because the eyespots on its hidden hindwings lack pupils.  You can read more about the Blinded Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  big bug on fennel plant
Geographic location of the bug:  jerusalem
Date: 07/18/2019
Time: 04:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, This morning I found this large bug? attached to my fennel plant.
It looks like a huge butterfly but has a large underbelly (in the 3rd photo)
How you want your letter signed:  Janet Baumgold-Land

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Janet,
This is an Oleander Hawkmoth, and it is resting on the fennel plant.  The food plant for the caterpillar is oleander, and the adult moths take nectar from a variety of flowers.

Thank you so much.
Janet
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Handsome moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Terrebonne, Oregon
Date: 07/15/2019
Time: 12:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this fellow on my porch railing. I was wondering what kind it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Marietta

Big Poplar Sphinx

Dear Marietta,
Your image is lovely.  We believe this is a Big Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, based on images and information on the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states it “flies in riparian areas and suburbs from Alberta and North Dakota west to eastern Washington; south to Texas, Arizona, southern California, and Baja California Norte.”  Because of the lack of feathering on the antennae, your individual is a female, additionally evidenced by her plump, egg-filled abdomen.

That makes sense, because even though we are in the desert, we have hybrid poplars in our yard.
Thank you.
Marietta
You should keep an eye out for the larval Hornworm, pictured on BugGuide.

Thanks. I’ve seen these and others, it helps to know what they feed on. I plant tomatoes FOR the hornworms. My neighbors hate me! Ha! You can’t have big, beautiful moths without big, ugly caterpillars.
Our hybrid poplars are also very popular with the Mourning Cloak butterflies.
Thanks for your time.
Marietta
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can anyone identify?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northumberland national park uk
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 05:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi would be great if you could Identify this, my partner is at work and is dying to find out!
How you want your letter signed:  Katherine

Large Elephant Hawkmoth

Dear Katherine,
This beauty is a Large Elephant Hawkmoth,
Deilephila elpenor, and according to UK Moths:  ” The English name of this moth is derived from the caterpillar’s fanciful resemblance to an elephant’s trunk.  The adults are attractively coloured pink and green affairs, with a streamlined appearance. They fly from May to July, visiting flowers such as honeysuckle (Lonicera) for nectar.  The larvae feed mainly on rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), but also other plants as well, including bedstraw (Galium).  It is a common species in most of Britain, including Scotland, where it has increased its range in recent years.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification wanted
Geographic location of the bug:  Norfolk england
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 10:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please identify this lovely specimen e on my fence
How you want your letter signed:  Christine

Privet Hawkmoth

Dear Christine,
This is a Privet Hawkmoth,
Sphinx ligustri, and according to UK Moths:  “Our largest resident hawk-moth, which is distributed in the southern half of Britain, and has distinctive pink and black barring on the body.  The similarly-striped hindwings are often concealed.  It frequents woodland and suburban habitats, and flies in June and July, with a single generation.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination