Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Photos/Identification Potentially
Location: Longmont, CO
May 17, 2015 8:32 am
Hi,
I took these photos a while back (July 29, 2013) and think it was potentially the coolest bug I have encountered, since it was just so huge! This particular critter was found in Longmont, Colorado (very close to Boulder).
Can you tell me more about it? I believe when I looked around at the time, it said it was a tomato moth? Also just wanted to share with your other readers! I know the second one is blurry, but it allows for size comparison since I had my finger in the shot.
Thanks for what you do!
Signature: Claire

Big Poplar Sphinx

Big Poplar Sphinx

Dear Claire,
Your moth is not a Tomato Moth, which we presume is your memory of the Tomato Hornworm, the larva of the Five Spotted Hawkmoth,
Manduca quinquemaculatus, though your moth is in the same family, hence it bears a physical resemblance to other members of the family.  Your Big Poplar Sphinx, Pachysphinx occidentalis, is stunning, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Big Poplar Sphinx

Big Poplar Sphinx

Thanks so much! I really enjoy every post on your site, and feel happy to be a small part of it!
Claire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown colorful moth in PA
Location: Berks County, Pennsylvania
May 16, 2015 11:59 am
Hello,
I have researched my Audobon guide and searched the internet but cannot find a positive ID on this pretty moth. Any ideas? Thank you!
Signature: Amy

Nessus Sphinx

Nessus Sphinx

Dear Amy,
Even though this particular species was not represented, you should have seen other members of the Sphinx Moth family Sphingidae in your Audubon Guide.  This is a Nessus Sphinx,
Amphion floridensis, and you can find additional information about this diurnal species on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  Interestingly, when we tried to name your image file for our archives, we learned that another Amy submitted an image of a Nessus Sphinx in 2010.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Black & white bug
Location: Riverview, FL
May 2, 2015 4:03 pm
I found this bug on the side of my house (in the sun) and it was near our water spout. I’ve never seen anything like it. Some have said it’s a moth of some sort. I’m just unsure as it has small wings and a large body.
Signature: Tara

Newly Eclosed Rustic Sphinx, we believe

Newly Eclosed Rustic Sphinx, we believe

Dear Tara,
You are correct that this is a moth.  When a moth first emerges from the pupa, its wings have not yet fully expanded, a process that may take several hours.  We believe this is a newly eclosed Rustic Sphinx.

Freshly Eclosed Rustic Sphinx

Freshly Eclosed Rustic Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: suffolk u.k
April 29, 2015 11:19 am
Hi there
last summer i noticed on the fly screen of the door the biggest mother of a moth i had ever seen. i quickly got my camera and took some photo’s of it. it was really quite beautiful but i have no clue what sort of moth it is. in live in suffolk in the U.K
any feedback gratefully received
Signature: juliet x

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Juliet,
This wondrous creature is a Poplar Hawkmoth,
Laothoe populi, and according to UK Moths, it is:  “Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear. If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden.”

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Thanks so much for that information. very much appreciated.
it was so lovely.
regards
juliet bumstead

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Moth
Location: California
April 8, 2015 9:57 pm
Hello,
I’ve identified lots of bugs thanks to your website and I was hoping you could help me identify this moth I found flying outside. I didn’t get any pictures of the body, but it looked tan with black spots. I’ve never seen a moth like this and I was curious about what it was. The body was about two inches long and I usually don’t see moths that big where I live. I would really appreciate it if you could help me out. I really want to be an entomologist, and I would like to know as much as I can about bugs for now. Thanks!
Signature: Melanie Ramos

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Melanie,
Good luck on your career goals.  This is a Whitelined Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, a common species in California as well as in most of North America.  We just posted an image of a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar.  In arid desert areas, there are periodical population explosions of both the adult moths and the caterpillars.  We are currently visited nightly by anywhere between one and four individuals coming to the porch light.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: San Diego, CA
March 18, 2015 9:45 pm
Found this in our kitchen tonight. Six year old is studying insects in science now and doing a report on dragonflies. Curious what this critter is.
Signature: The Duncans

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Duncans,
Alas your child cannot use these images to illustrate a report on Dragonflies as it is a Sphinx Moth, more specifically a Whitelined Sphinx,
Hyles lineata.  Like dragonflies, Whitelined Sphinx Moths are very aerodynamic in flight and they are often mistaken for hummingbirds.  Whitelined Sphinx Moths are currently flying in Southern California.  This is a species that periodically experiences population explosions that tend to coincide with years when there is lush desert growth.  The rain patter this winter, though we are still firmly entrenched in a drought, was so wide spread that it was conducive to a lush desert growth, and we expect it to be a big year for both Caterpillars and adult Whitelined Sphinx Moth.

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Thanks so much for the info.  My daughter was excited to read your email.  We didn’t really think it was a dragonfly, but have had insects on the brain.  We appreciate your work!
Kristin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination