Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Upstate New York
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 12:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A neighbor found this moth in her garden. It sprays a liquid from its hind end when threatened. We are in Bloomingdale, NY. Upstate. Wondering what kind of moth it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Al Schrage

Modest Sphinx

Dear Al,
This is a Modest Sphinx,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we speculate that the “liquid from its hind end” is a byproduct of its recent metamorphosis into an adult.  You can read more about the Modest Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange Large Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Whitehouse, Texas (Near Tyler)
Date: 06/04/2019
Time: 04:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth hangs around a flowering tree in our back yard along with lots of bumblebees. The blooms are blue and very fragrant. To us, it seems the moth’s coloration kind of memics a bumblebee perhaps as protection from predators.
How you want your letter signed:  Bob & Elaine Jackson

Nessus Sphinx

Dear Bob & Elaine,
This is a diurnal Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and many members of this family that fly during the day are confused with hummingbirds because of their method of hovering while feeding.  Your Moth is a Nessus Sphinx,
Amphion floridensis.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  ” The adult Nessus sphinx, which flies during the day and at dusk, has two bright yellow bands on the tufted abdomen.  At rest, dark red-brown upperwings hide the red-orange median band and yellow spot of the hindwings.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Idaho
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 10:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey buggy man…I found this on my wall east side late afternoon in Idaho…we have maple trees and some blue spruce trees. may have some poplar trees around too.
How you want your letter signed:  Gary

Possibly Twin Spotted Sphinx

Dear Gary,
This is a Sphinx Moth in the genus Smerinthus, but we are uncertain of the species as there are to possible species that are known to fly in Idaho, and they are very difficult to distinguish from one another.  One possibility pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas is the Twin Spotted Sphinx,
Smirinthus jamaicensis, and the other species with no common name, Smirinthus ophthalmica, is also pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lime green hawk moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Christiana Tn
Date: 05/06/2019
Time: 05:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What type of moth is this? Closest I could find was a lime green hawk moth but they are not known in this area.
How you want your letter signed:  Tiffany

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear Tiffany,
The Lime Hawk Moth is a European species in the same family as your Virginia Creeper Sphinx,
Darapsa myron, also known as the Hog SphinxAccording to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Darapsa myron larvae feed on Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), Grape (Vitis), Ampelopsis, and Viburnum.”  According to BugGuide:  “very common; sometimes abundant.”

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying large bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix az
Date: 04/02/2019
Time: 10:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Honi

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Honi,
This is a Whitelined Sphinx Moth, and they are currently flying in Southern California since there are three resting on the front door of the WTB? offices.  Significant rainfall in the southwest this winter resulted in “super blooms” in many desert areas, and the increase in vegetation also resulted in more food for caterpillars and moths.  We have yet to receive any reports of large numbers of Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars this year, though we suspect we will receive such reports before long.  Some years the Whitelined Sphinx Moths are quite plentiful, and we suspect this will be one of those years.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need to know
Geographic location of the bug:  Gettysburg, PA
Date: 04/02/2019
Time: 12:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Curious what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Dee

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear Dee,
Is this a current sighting or was this image taken previously?  This is a Virginia Creeper Sphinx, and based on BugGuide data, the earliest reported sightings in Pennsylvania occur in May, so an early April sighting seems quite unusual.  You can find additional information on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination