Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"

Subject:  What is this monstrosity
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix Arizona
Date: 10/02/2021
Time: 08:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m generally afraid of insects and i saw this thing and almost died of fright. Just want to know who my almost killer is. Btw thats almost the size of my palm…

😱
How you want your letter signed:  Scared of bugs

Achemon Sphinx

Dear Scared of Bugs,
This Achemon Sphinx Moth is perfectly harmless.  It cannot sting nor bite.

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Oceanside, Ca.
Date: 09/03/2021
Time: 03:24 PM EDT
Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Oceanside, Ca.
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. My wife discovered this winged insect (moth) camouflaged on our gate. Have never seen one like this before. Can you identify please? Thanks much!
How you want your letter signed:  Flummoxed in Oceanside.

Sphinx Moth

Dear Flummoxed in Oceanside,
You are correct that this is a Moth, a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  Your individual is tattered and possibly faded due to age or a tough life.  We were not able to pinpoint an exact species of the individuals pictured on
iNaturalist, but we will give it more scrutiny later in the day.  Meanwhile perhaps one of our readers will recognize the species.

Subject:  Bee/moth???
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kootenay,B.C ,canada
Date: 08/23/2021
Time: 09:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, I found this fellow resting on my lilac bush. I posted a picture on facebook and a local farm page. They all say it looks like a hummingbird moth. I have seen a hummingbird moth and it didnt look like this. Your help is appreciated, thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed: Brenda

Bumblebee Moth

Dear Brenda,
The folks who thought this was a Hummingbird Moth
Hemaris thysbe, recognized that this is a member of the same genus. Hemaris.  Your moth is Hemaris thetis.  According to Pacific Northwest Moths:  “Hemaris thetis is a medium-sized, day-flying sphinx moth (FW length 17 mm) with clear wings that resembles a bumblebee. The forewings are long and very narrow for the size of the moth and the hindwings are quite small” and “Adults fly during the day and are bumblebee mimics.  They nectar and hover in front of flowers while feeding, unlike bumblebees which land on the flower.”  There are many images on Butterflies and Moths of North America.  According to CalScape it is called a Bumblebee Moth.  As an aside, many diurnal Sphinx Moths are called Hummingbird Moths.

Bumblebee Moth

Daniel,  Thank you very much.
Brenda

 

Subject:  Lime Hawk moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Knightdale NC
Date: 08/19/2021
Time: 07:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is supposed to be indigenous to the UK.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Pandorus Sphinx

You are correct that the Lime Hawkmoth is native to Europe, but this is not a Lime Hawkmoth.  It is a native Pandorus Sphinx.  Nonetheless, there is an introduced population of Lime Hawkmoths in North America, with many Canadian sightings.

Subject:  Striped Hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Chicopee, MA USA
Date: 08/17/2021
Time: 11:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
This little guy or gal was zipping around the yard tonight. I am guessing it’s a Striped Hawkmoth, correct? Are they becoming more common for this area?
How you want your letter signed:  Kristi

Bedstraw Hawkmoth

Dear Kristi,
This is a Hawkmoth, but a different species.  This is a Bedstraw Hawkmoth and you can verify our ID on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states that it:  “ranges coast to coast in Canada (into the Yukon) and southward along the Rocky Mountains into Mexico. It is also widely distributed throughout Europe and Asia.”  Your action photo is stunning.

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Nc
Date: 08/14/2021
Time: 09:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Do you know what this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Pamela Grissom

Banded Sphinx

Dear Pamela,
This is a Banded Sphinx,
Eumorpha fasciatus.  According to BugGuide:  “Strong white bands on wings. Brown band on costa (leading edge of forewing) distinguishes from the similar, less widespread, Vine Sphinx, E. vitis.”