Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mid west USA specifically southern minnesota
Date: 06/16/2018
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this moth on a basket outside my house. I can’t seem to find any info on it or another moth that resembles it. It’s green was very fuzzy.
How you want your letter signed:  M

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear M,
This beautiful moth is a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx,
Darapsa myron, and we identified it thanks to images on BugGuide.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  ” Darapsa myron larvae feed on Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), Grape (Vitis), Ampelopsis, and Viburnum.”

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Looks like a rare moth almost 1″ wingspan and length
Geographic location of the bug:  NW Montana
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this in our lawn a few days ago. Thought it was a bee, but could actually be a moth.
How you want your letter signed:  Rich Kurth

Bee Hawkmoth

Dear Rich,
This Bee Hawk Moth is called solely by its scientific name 
Hemaris thetis on BugGuide. but on Sphingidae of the Americas, it is given a physiologically descriptive common name.

Thank you Daniel. You nailed it. An absolutely beautiful moth.
Rich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Satellite Sphinx of Mexico?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tamaulipas, Mexico
Date: 04/22/2018
Time: 05:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
My parents just sent me this photo of what I think is a Satellite Sphinx, taken outside their residence in Tamaulipas, Mexico. It’s markings are gorgeous and resemble some of the photos I’ve seen you post of Eumorpha Satellita, but I also spot some differences, like the dark brown, triangular patches behind its head. Am I on the right track with identifying it as the Satellite Sphinx?
How you want your letter signed:  H. Oakes

Satellite Sphinx

Dear H. Oakes,
We agree with you that this looks like a Satellite Sphinx, and its markings look almost exactly those of the individual in this BugGuide posting.  There are also images on Sphingidae of the Americas.  There are 11
Eumorpha species reported as ranging in Mexico on Sphingidae of the Americas, and some look similar, but in our opinion, the Satellite Sphinx is the closest visual match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Beach, CA
Date: 04/10/2018
Time: 10:16 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello –
This moth has been visiting my front porch for the last 12 hours or so.  I haven’t been able to get a photo with wings open yet, but from what i can see the markings looks like a whitelined sphinx to me.  What do you think?
Thanks a lot for the help!
How you want your letter signed:  Laurie

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Laurie,
This Whitelined Sphinx Moth or Striped Morning Sphinx is one of the most common, large, Southern California Moths and indications are that they are flying in Southern California now.  Just last evening Daniel watched a female ovipositing on the leaves of the sprouting primroses in the garden, and this morning there is one resting on the screen door.  This species tends to fly at dawn and dusk, and it is not unusual for an individual to rest for a day or more before taking flight again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White-lined Sphinx Moth, I Believe
Geographic location of the bug:  Coryell County, Texas
Date: 03/20/2018
Time: 01:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello again! Hope you are both well!
This beautiful moth was literally at my feet when I went to check on the creeping phlox, and hahahahaha the proboscis! A built-in bendy-straw, amazing. I don’t know if it was pink from nectar or a reflection from the pink phlox, and perhaps the yellow was from carrying some pollen as well, or perhaps it was its natural color (?).
The phlox is a huge hit with the pollinators, and I’m glad we planted so much of it. It’s an early bloomer here in  centralTexas. We saw pipevine swallowtails and black swallowtails nectaring at the phlox also this month. Lovely!
A reference I found: https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Hyles-lineata
Thank you and best wishes!
How you want your letter signed:  Ellen

Whitelined Sphinx

Hi Ellen,
It is so nice to hear from you after so much time.  Your images of a Whitelined Sphinx, AKA Striped Morning Sphinx, are gorgeous.  The underwings of the Whitelined Sphinx are actually pink, and not the result of any reflections.  We have fond memories of the summer phlox in Mom’s garden in Ohio back in the 1960s, and all the butterflies and diurnal moths they attracted.

Whitelined Sphinx

Thank you so much for the quick response and kind words! My poorly-written wondering was about the very-long proboscis. In several photos the proboscis actually looked pink at the flower end. I was wondering if the nectar itself is pink and showing through the membrane of the proboscis. The proboscis also seems to carry pollen in some of my photos. I apologize for the confusion, which I’ll blame either on my over-use of the pronoun “it”, the fact that I tend to ramble on too much,  or perhaps the late hour, or my amusement at the beautiful but very large and pink (!) moth.  The Sphinx makes me smile! Hopefully it will return again today.
Very best wishes to you both!
Ellen

Whitelined Sphinx

Thanks for the clarification Ellen, but alas, we don’t know the answer to your questions.  We have now included a close-up crop of your image to show the proboscis.  Part of the effect is due to the lighting.  The Whitelined Sphinx often flies at dawn and dusk, and since, according to our friend lepidopterist Julian Donahue, Sphinx Moths are relatively long lived, you might see this individual over the next few weeks, and you might even see more.  Periodically, in arid environments, the Whitelined Sphinx populations explode.  We have found as many as eight or more individuals at our screen door some mornings.

What causes the color on the proboscis???

Eight moths at once, amazing! Your memories of phlox in the garden from when you were a child, wonderful. It’s a new plant for me, in the ground just two years, and it’s really taken off this year. I saw five different species of butterflies and moths visiting the phlox yesterday, including two individuals of the White-lined Sphinx moths, just beautiful. As always, I greatly appreciate our help and information. Thank you so very much. Best wishes!

Ellen
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hummingbird Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Alachua, Fl.
Date: 02/27/2018
Time: 11:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello.  We get many hummingbird moths each Spring as they love to nectar on our orange blossoms.  This is the first I’ve seen with white stripes.  Newly emerged, perhaps?  Impressive insect.  Fast little buggers.  Hard to photograph.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth C.

Nessus Sphinx

Dear Elizabeth,
According to Sphingidae of the Americas, there are at least 65 species of Sphinx Moths, sometimes called Hummingbird Moths, reported from Flordia.  This is a Nessus Sphinx,
Amphion floridensis, and you can read more about the species on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination