Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  we’ve named him ricardo….
Geographic location of the bug:  central texas
Date: 10/16/2018
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  this guy has been hanging out recently and we have admired him. can you tell me what type of moth this is?
How you want your letter signed:  aggie moth watcher

Tersa Sphinx

Dear aggie moth watcher,
Ricardo is a Tersa Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lime Hawk Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Just outside Philadelphia
Date: 10/02/2018
Time: 09:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this moth on our garage today. We looked it up and we think it might be a Lime Hawk Moth but they are not from Pennsylvania so we’re not sure how it got here. We live just outside Philadelphia.
How you want your letter signed:  Leslie

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Leslie,
This is a Pandorus Sphinx, a native species for you, not a European Lime Hawk Moth.  Many years ago, we posted an image of a Lime Hawk Moth found in Pennsylvania, but that appears to have been an isolated sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of moth is this
Geographic location of the bug:  33063, Margate FL
Date: 09/25/2018
Time: 02:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was hanging around hiding from the sun for a bit just wondering what it is
How you want your letter signed:  AJ Hait

Banded Sphinx

Dear AJ Hait,
This striking moth is a Banded Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful art deco moth!
Geographic location of the bug:  South Florida
Date: 08/28/2018
Time: 11:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this beautiful fella in Sarasota, Florida. He was so striking I had to stop and take a picture! I’m wondering what species he is. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Alys

Banded Sphinx

Dear Alys,
The beautiful Banded Sphinx is described on Sphingidae of the Americas: “The upperside of the moth is dark pinkish brown. Each forewing has a lighter brown band along the costa, and sharp pinkish white bands and streaks. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Grub Metamorphosis
Geographic location of the bug:  Vista, CA
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 02:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Update:  August 26, 2018
Hi Guys,
Here are links to pics:
Pupa – https://drive.google.com/open?id=1VmfiZ8OfdILBMZ_Q58jIGLGyeEUprQ8R

Adult – https://drive.google.com/open?id=1TortVzZlmgrWmashwSYC7tzV2nUV2sEl

Specimen got away before I could get a good shot of it fully developed.
Regards,
John

Giant Sphinx: Newly formed pupa

Dear John,
Thanks so much for providing images of the metamorphosis of the Giant Sphinx,
Cocytius antaeus.  They are a wonderful addition to the image of the Hornworm you submitted last month.

Giant Sphinx

P.S.
Pupated on 7-26-18 and hatched on 8-17-18 – just in case data was lost when uploaded.

Giant Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I have never seen anything like this
Geographic location of the bug:  Clifford o tario
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 07:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was sitting on the deck and this flying insect was at my petunias could you please tell me what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlyn wein

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Marlyn,
We started our research by verifying your location, which we were guessing might be somewhere in Ireland, and we felt pretty foolish when we eventually realized you failed to capitalize the “O” and you dropped the “n”.  This is a diurnal Sphinx Moth in the genus
Hemaris.  Four members of the genus are reported in “o tario” on Sphingidae of the Americas, and our best guess is that this is the Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “readily visits flowers by day throughout the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada, where it ranges far to the north, … It is not difficult to see why many gardeners would mistake an Hemaris thysbe moth for a small hummingbird as it hovers, sipping nectar from flowers through a long feeding tube.  The moth hovers briefly, sipping for only a few seconds before darting off to a new flower. Green body ‘fur’ and burgundy wing scales suggest a small ruby throated hummingbird.  Adults can be quite variable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination