Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please ID this moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Canoga Park, CA, USA
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 01:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I found this large grey moth on the sidewalk while going to work. It was about the size of a small human hand.
How you want your letter signed:  Joshua Kleinberg

Great Ash Sphinx

Dear Joshua,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is a Great Ash Sphinx which is pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Carlsbad, California
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 11:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this large moth outside my workplace. It made me think of the peppered moths I read about in high school, but I don’t know if they’d be found in Southern California
How you want your letter signed:  Thomas

Rustic Sphinx

Dear Thomas,
We don’t know what “peppered moths” are, but this is a Rustic Sphinx.

Rustic Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Indiana
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 09:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this moth is? We have looked around at many options but can’t quite place it. Might be a Catalpa or a Northern Pine?
How you want your letter signed:  Joshua

Waved Sphinx

Dear Joshua,
We actually believe this is a Waved Sphinx,
Ceratomia undulosa, which is in the same genus as the Catalpa Sphinx.  See images on Sphingidae of the Americas.  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke for confirmation.

Waved Sphinx

Thank you for such a quick response! We were definitely curious and several of us were searching the web for photos to identify. Thanks for the link to the specific page as well!
Sincerely,
Joshua~

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug/moth/bee/fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Rothesay New Brunswick Canada
Date: 08/06/2019
Time: 07:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please see pictures of the strangest bug I’ve ever seen. No one we’ve showed pictures to knows what it is!
Pictures taken this week (summer Atlantic Canada)
How you want your letter signed:  D. Gregory

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear D. Gregory,
This is one of the diurnal Sphinx Moths in the genus
Hemaris, and according to Sphingidae of the Americas, there are four possible species that are found in New Brunswick.  Based on images posted to Sphingidae of the Americas, we strongly suspect your individual is a Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe.  We want to commend you on your excellent images from three different camera angles.  Diurnal Sphinx Moths are often mistaken for small hummingbirds.

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan
Date: 08/03/2019
Time: 11:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What kind of moth is this? He was about 4 inches
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan

Carolina Sphinx

Dear Ryan,
This is a Carolina Sphinx, and its caterpillar, the Tobacco Hornworm, is familiar to many home gardeners who grow tomatoes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwestern NH
Date: 07/24/2019
Time: 01:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen about 7am after a night of steady rain, the moth was attached to an outside house window screen, and about three feet from that one, another sitting on the plastic frame of the garden hose holder. July 23, 2019.
How you want your letter signed:  NH woodland area

Blinded Sphinx with Rain Drops

Your close-up image of the Sphinx Moth with rain drops is gorgeous.  We are happy you also sent more traditional dorsal views as we were able to identify it as Paonias excaecata a Blinded Sphinx, a common name that refers to the markings on the oceli on the underwings.  When the moth is threatened, it reveals the underwings which creates the illusion of a pair of eyes startling a predator into perceiving that it might have awakened a sleeping giant.  Because those markings include a light blue center dot, rather than a black pupil found on the oceli of many other species of “eyed moths”, the Blinded Sphinx appears to have cataracts.  In searching for Sphingidae of the Americas, we encountered a new [to us] site Sphingidae of the United States of America where it states:  “This species seems to only fly in the warmer months in the Northeast, and even in Florida, it doesn’t seem to be recorded from December to March. This species is extremely common at lights, and both sexes are attracted to light. It does not feed as an adult. The adults do have a fairly large size difference, with females being much larger and rounder than males.”  After that internet detour, we returned to Sphingidae of the Americas to get the information “Males demonstrate a strong curve to the abdomen” so we could inform you that both of your moths are males.

Blinded Sphinx

Awesome!
I researched your page and guessed a Blind Sphinx. Thank you for confirming. This encounter, with these two beauties has peaked my interest, and I’ll now be on the look out for others.
Enjoy the rain drop photo. I did take it myself with an iPhone 8 Plus. You may use it if you want on your page.
Happy week,
Nan

Blinded Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination