Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moth?
Location: South Central WI
July 27, 2017 3:10 pm
Photo from Blue Mounds, WI. Any idea what type of moth this is? It’s a beauty!
Signature: Thom

Laurel Sphinx Moth

Dear Thom,
Based on this BugGuide image, we believe you sighted a Laurel Sphinx.  Also known as the Fawn Sphinx, BugGuide states:  “this species was long known as the Laurel Sphinx because the specific epithet was mistakenly thought to refer to the host genus
Kalmia (Laurel)” and “Named in honor of botanist Pehr (Peter) Kalm (1716 – 1779), one of the most important apostles of Carl Linnaeus.”  The actual food plants posted on BugGuide are:  “Ash, fringe-tree, lilac, privet, and plants in the olive family (Oleaceae).”  Sphingidae of the Americas provides this explanation for the name:  “The species name ‘kalmiae probably originates from Pehr Kalm, an 18th century Swedish naturalist. ‘Kalmia‘ is the genus name for various laurels. Moths may have been seen nectaring at the flowers, or the golden colour of the forewings might have suggested the ‘laurel wreathe’ used to honour ‘gold medalists’.”  The Laurel Sphinx Caterpillar is also quite impressive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sphix Moth
Location: Northern Wisconsin
July 20, 2017 10:33 am
I photographed this moth in late July (July 19) in Vilas County Wisconsin (northern WI). It looks like a Big Poplar Moth, but it’s coloring is not quite right. Can you help identify it?
Signature: Julie Draves

Modest Sphinx

Dear Julie,
We verified the identity of your Modest Sphinx,
Pachysphinx modesta, on Sphingidae of the Americas.  It is also commonly called the Poplar Sphinx.  A similar looking, related species in the same genus, Pachysphinx occidentalis, is commonly called the Big Poplar Sphinx, but it is a western species not reported in Wisconsin according to Sphingidae of the Americas.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Bend Oregon
July 13, 2017 1:03 pm
Found this giant outside my apartment this morning. Thinking it may be a hawk moth, but not sure.
Signature: Ashley N

Big Poplar Sphinx or Modest Sphinx

Dear Ashley,
Based on images on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, we believe this is a Big Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, one of the Hawkmoths, but since their ranges overlap in Oregon, we would not rule out that this might be the Modest Sphinx, Pachysphinx modesta, which is also pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this moth
Location: New Hampshire
July 4, 2017 4:27 pm
Good day – this moth fell out of a hanging basket of pansys today. Wondering what kind it might be. I live in New Hampshire, USA and I don’t believe I have seen a moth like this before.
Signature: Brendan

Hog Sphinx

Dear Brendan,
Your Sphinx Moth is
Darapsa myron, commonly called a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Moth
Location: Allegan, MI
June 28, 2017 9:52 am
Found on wood outside my office building near a river – camouflaged well with the wood.
Signature: Ani

Laurel Sphinx

Dear Ani,
This is a Laurel Sphinx,
Sphinx kalmiae, and it is very well camouflaged against that wooden wall.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  ” In Canada, Sphinx kalmiae is single-brooded with most adults on the wing in June and July.  In New Jersey and Connecticut and states of that latitude, the Laurel Sphinx is double-brooded (late May-June flight and then again in July-August).  There are as many as six broods in Louisiana with the first brood appearing in early to mid April.”

Laurel Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Texas
June 27, 2017 8:11 pm
Found this little guy in the elevator lobby of my apartment. He seemed sick, so I moved him back outside, poor lil guy. Any idea what kind he is? He’s about an inch or so long. Also, what’s the best thing to do for a moth that’s looking worse for wear? I spilled a little water out for him, but he didn’t seem to want it.
Signature: Moth friend

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Dear Moth friend,
This sure looks like a Virginia Creeper Sphinx or Hog Sphinx,
Darapsa myron, to us, and you can verify our identification by comparing your image to images on BugGuide and Sphingidae of the Americas.  Sphinx Moths are relatively long lived as moths go, and the tattered appearance of the wings indicates that this individual may have been flying for a month or more.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination