Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant type chunky moth thing
Geographic location of the bug:  Scotland
Date: 06/03/2020
Time: 04:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  On my dairy staircase this morning I woke up to find a giant moth type thing. It’s is huge computed to a moth and much chunkier. About half the size of my hand. Some
Googling shows maybe a hawk moth but I’m in Scotland not the tropics. I’m central Scotland near Glasgow.
How you want your letter signed:  Nicola Smith

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Nicola,
This impressive moth is a Poplar Hawkmoth.  According to Butterfly Conservation:  “Female comes to light before midnight, the male after midnight, in greater numbers. Rests with abdomen curved up and hindwings further forward than the forewings.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Fonhadela, Vila Real, Portugal.
Date: 05/22/2020
Time: 02:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello.I have been trying to identify this moth. But I do not know if it is Hemaris fuciformis or H.thysbe. Which one have I photographed? And what is the difference between both species?
Thank you. Isabel.
How you want your letter signed:  Informal

Broad Bordered Bee Hawkmoth

We believe this is a Broad Bordered Bee Hawkmoth, Hemaris fuciformis, and not Hemaris thysbe, a new world species.  It is pictured on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic and on Insecta.pro where it states:  “It flies from late May to early July.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Very Large Unusual Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Leicestershire
Date: 05/31/2020
Time: 04:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, I saw this huge moth in the middle of the day, on the pavement outside my house. It was struggling to fly. Any ideas what it is? I’ve never seen anything like it!
How you want your letter signed:  Kerry

Privet Hawkmoth

Dear Kerry,
According to UK Moths, the Privet Hawkmoth is your
largest resident hawk-moth, which is distributed in the southern half of Britain, and has distinctive pink and black barring on the body.  The similarly-striped hindwings are often concealed.  It frequents woodland and suburban habitats, and flies in June and July, with a single generation.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Gentle Readers,
Since the onset of COVID-19, Daniel has been overwhelmed with computer based activities, including teaching college students online and running ZOOM meetings, and to maintain mindfulness as well as having a real sense of physical accomplishment, he has eschewed all leisurely contact with the computer, including responding to and posting your many submitted identification queries, and he has instead devoted time to being in contact with the earth, his garden and the diversity of wildlife and plants that share that space with him.  Please forgive his inattentions to this website he really does love so much.  He has not been troubled with ill health, either physical or mental.  He just feels the need to unplug, slow down and enjoy life.  While it is not much to look at, this tattered Cramer’s Sphinx is the second that has visited his porch recently, the first being a much more beautiful individual in 2015, and allegedly the first local sighting in 50 years. There are only three sightings on BugGuide, so this must really be a North American rarity.  In order to be certain of this identification, Daniel has consulted both Julian Donahue and Bill Oehlke.

Cramer’s Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sunshine Coast, Queensland
Date: 02/29/2020
Time: 04:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
This moth stopped by and stuck with me for an hour. Ive never seen a moth like it, and was super interested to know what it was? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie

Macroglossum errans

Dear Melanie,
We apologize for the long delay.  We had identified your Hawkmoth as
Macroglossum errans on Butterfly House before the world as we know it changed due to COVID-19, but we did not complete a posting.  This pretty little moth does not have a common name.  There are also some images on the Butterflies of a Dorrigo Garden and Moths site where it states:  “”Flight habit:  Nocturnal – Active at night including early evening.”

Macroglossum errans

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Whats this insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Date: 01/25/2020
Time: 05:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell us what this is? It looks like a fighter jet!
How you want your letter signed:  Shree

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Shree,
This beautiful, aerodynamic creature is an Oleander Hawkmoth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination