Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"

Subject:  rothschildia in Yasuni National Park Ecuador
Geographic location of the bug:  Orellana, Ecuador, Yasuni National Park.
Date: 08/27/2019
Time: 10:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  See https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28849696 for the inaturalist post. Beautiful Rothschildia but I cannot identify it!
How you want your letter signed:  Trevor

Giant Silkmoth: Rosthchildia arethusa rhodina

Dear Trevor,
We also have trouble with
Rothschildia species, so we are contacting Bill Oehlke to see if he can identify the species.

Update courtesy of Bill Oehlke:  September 23, 2019
Daniel, I do not think I previously responded to this one
Rothschildia arethusa rhodina
Jordan, 1911
I anticipated it in Orellana, but I think this is first confirmed report.
Bill

Subject:  Moth-like bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Concord, North Carolina
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 11:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I saw this interesting bug on my back porch, and I can’t identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  No

Royal Walnut Moth

This beautiful moth is a Royal Walnut Moth or Regal Moth, the adult form of the equally spectacular Hickory Horned Devil.

Subject:  Giant moth in my car
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 07/12/2019
Time: 03:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was driving my kids to daycare this morning and in my rearview mirror I saw what I thought might be a leaf on my window. Then at a red light I turned around and realized it was in fact not a leaf, but a giant moth. I would just like to know what kind. Can you please help me identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Ashley F.

Polyphemus Moth laying eggs

Dear Ashley,
It appears as though this Polyphemus Moth has laid some eggs.

Should I feel bad for removing them? I mean it’s such a beautiful moth! But i really don’t want them living in my vehicle…

You can try placing the leaves on one of the following trees identified on BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of broad-leaved trees and shrubs, including birch, grape, hickory, maple, oak, willow, and members of the rose family.”

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pine Grove Mills, PA
Date: 07/09/2019
Time: 04:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman.  On the side of mom’s house today July 9. 2019
How you want your letter signed:  CC

Luna Moth

Dear CC,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Luna Moth.  We never tire of posting beautiful images of this gorgeous moth.

Subject:  Polyphemus Moths mating
Geographic location of the bug:  Pottstown,Pa.
Date: 07/04/2019
Time: 04:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband found these two hanging out at our pool. We were Amazed! We have Never seen anything so beautiful.
How you want your letter signed:  Bev Farris

Mating Polyphemus Moths

Dear Bev,
Thanks so much for sending in your images of mating Polyphemus Moths.  They are indeed a wondrous sight.  The lower moth in the pair is the male, as evidenced by his much bushier antennae that he uses to locate a female by the pheromones she releases.

Mating Polyphemus Moths

Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Korea, Cheonan, Seonggeosan
Date: 06/30/2019
Time: 07:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello
Could you tell me if this is a moth? And what species is this please?
This was a very large insect with beautiful patterns on its wings!
Many thanks for your help.
How you want your letter signed:  Paul Scott

Giant Silkmoth: Brahmaea certhia

Dear Paul,
This Giant Silkmoth is positively stunning.  We quickly identified it as
Brahmaea certhia thanks to this Ebay posting, and we verified its identity on The Insect Collector.   Bold Systems, a more reliable source, confirms that identification.  We are quite curious about the unusual nature of the different tonalities in the underwings.  The left underwing is considerably lighter than the right side.

Giant Silkmoth: Brahmaea certhia

Thanks very much for the info. I hope to find more but considering this is the first one I have found in my three years of regular hiking in Korea, the chances might be slim.
Now I can read up about these creatures and learn a bit about them!
Thanks again!
Best wishes
Paul