Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Silkmoth
Location: captivity
January 8, 2017 10:03 am
I saw a FB Post saying you didn’t have a photo of the Giant Silkmoth. The drawing is so spot on, I don’t think you need one, but here it is – from the Butterfly Wonderland in Scottsdale, AZ
Signature: Ranger Dan

Madagascar Moon Moth

Dear Ranger Dan,
Thanks so much for sending in your gorgeous image of a Madagascar Moon Moth,
Argema mittrei, in captivity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Argema mittrei life stages
Location: Madagascar
January 6, 2017 11:47 am
Dear Daniel,
with my best wishes for 2017, I’d like to send You a drawing with Argema mittrei life stages as a little Christmas present…
Best
Bostjan
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Life Cycle of Argema mittrei by Bostjan Dvorak

Happy New Year Bostjan,
Thank you for submitting your beautiful drawing. 
Argema mittrei is really a beautiful Giant Silkmoth.  While we do not have any images on our site of that species, we do have an image of a relative from the African mainland, Argema mimosae, on our site.  We also have an image of what we believe to be the Caterpillar of Argema mimosae.  Perhaps you can let us know if that identification is correct. Mada Magazine has a nice article on the Madagascar Moon Moth or Comet Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: Tangjiahe Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China
December 8, 2016 12:39 pm
This one was also photographed in Tangjiahe Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China at night sitting on asphalt road. Between tips of wings estimated to be about 60 and 80 mm.
Signature: Stefan Lithner

Giant Silkmoth from China

Giant Silkmoth from China

Dear Stefan,
This is a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae, but we cannot seem to locate a matching image online.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Floridian moths
Location: Southwest Florida
November 6, 2016 1:38 pm
Would you help me identify these two beauties?
The big yellow one, dying on its back, had similar coloring on the top side of its wings.
The reddish copper one, taking a nap on the wall, was much smaller.
Thank you!
Signature: Lost Yankee

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Dear Lost Yankee,
Both of your moths are Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae.  The dead yellow moth is an Imperial Moth,
Eacles imperialis, and in our opinion, they are much more beautiful alive than dead.  Though you did not indicate from where you were transplanted, you might be interested in knowing that the Imperial Moth is found throughout eastern North America, as far west as Texas and north into Canada.  Your other moth is an Oakworm Moth in the genus Anisota, and members of this genus share a similar range, but extending west to Arizona.

Oakworm Moth

Oakworm Moth

Neat! I wondered if the yellow one was
an Imperial. Certainly has a regally wide wingspan.  Maine is where I
come from, and even though the Imperial ranges that far north, I’ve never seen it.
Too bad the Oakworm moth caterpillars feed on our beautiful live oak trees, but they grow up to be good-looking little fuzzies.
Thank you very much for your quick and informative reply, Bugman! As I explore Florida, you may hear from me again.
Lost Yankee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth S.A
Location: Polowane, South Africa
October 26, 2016 12:39 am
Hi there bugman. Please help ID, northern South Africa, Limpopo Prov. 13cm wingspan
Signature: Ryno J

Emperor Moth

Cabbage Emperor Moth

Dear Ryno,
This is a lovely image of a female Cabbage Emperor Moth,
Bunaea alcinoe, which is pictured on African Moths.  We frequently receive images of the caterpillars of Cabbage Emperor Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Bug on Car
Location: Winter Park, FL
October 15, 2016 8:26 am
This large looking moth was hanging on the side of a car. Hurricane Matthew recently came through, wondered if it could have been disturbed by the storm.
Signature: Maxwell D Osborne

Male Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Maxwell,
This male Polyphemus Moth is a local species for you, and we don’t believe Hurricane Matthew had anything to do with its appearance.  The startling eyespot markings are hidden in your image.  Polyphmus Moths are found in all 48 lower United States.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination