Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Polyphemus
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 10/06/2019
Time: 01:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this almost becoming prey to a bird when I came outside. Luckily I scared the bird off but the moth was struggling to get up. I put the dog inside and came back out to find it waddling up the tree to safety. Can you tell if it’s a female, pregnant, or going to be ok? Is there anything I can do?
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned neighbor

Female Polyphemus Moth

Dear Concerned neighborh,
This is indeed a Polyphemus Moth and she is a female moth.  Since all Giant Silkmoths, including the Polyphemus, do not feed as adults, they only have a few days to mate and produce a new generation, so virtually all female Polyphemus Moths are “pregnant”.  You should let nature takes its course, but your kind actions in rescuing this individual from a bird has earned you the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink Moth with Fuzzy Red Head
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found a moth with beautiful pink wings. It’s fuzzy head was a dark red with the color transitioning into the wings. Fuzzy thick arms and on its underside it was brown. It’s currently September in Central Florida. It was sitting on a window at a pharmacy.
How you want your letter signed:  🙂

Female Io Moth

Dear :),
This is a female Io Moth, but her most distinguishing physical feature is not apparent in your image.  Both female and male Io Moth have striking eyespot markings on the underwings that are hidden when the moth is at rest.  Once startled, the moth reveals the underwings, potentially frightening a predator into perceiving that it has wakened a sleeping giant that could turn around and eat the predator.  This illusion is protective mimicry.  We suspect this individual was attracted by the pharmacy lights and then decided to stay and rest during the day until the following night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Malformed moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midway Utah – on the WOW trail
Date: 09/10/2019
Time: 12:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this little guy crawling around while biking. It looks like he didn’t develop properly. Can you tell what species it might be? And what would cause it to grow so poorly?
How you want your letter signed:  JAB

Newly emerged Buck Moth

Dear JAB,
This is a Buck Moth in the genus
Hemileuca that has just emerged from the pupa and its wings have not yet expanded.  There are at least eight species in Utah in the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  rothschildia in Yasuni National Park Ecuador
Geographic location of the bug:  Orellana, Ecuador, Yasuni National Park.
Date: 08/27/2019
Time: 10:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  See https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28849696 for the inaturalist post. Beautiful Rothschildia but I cannot identify it!
How you want your letter signed:  Trevor

Giant Silkmoth: Rosthchildia arethusa rhodina

Dear Trevor,
We also have trouble with
Rothschildia species, so we are contacting Bill Oehlke to see if he can identify the species.

Update courtesy of Bill Oehlke:  September 23, 2019
Daniel, I do not think I previously responded to this one
Rothschildia arethusa rhodina
Jordan, 1911
I anticipated it in Orellana, but I think this is first confirmed report.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth-like bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Concord, North Carolina
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 11:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I saw this interesting bug on my back porch, and I can’t identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  No

Royal Walnut Moth

This beautiful moth is a Royal Walnut Moth or Regal Moth, the adult form of the equally spectacular Hickory Horned Devil.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant moth in my car
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 07/12/2019
Time: 03:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was driving my kids to daycare this morning and in my rearview mirror I saw what I thought might be a leaf on my window. Then at a red light I turned around and realized it was in fact not a leaf, but a giant moth. I would just like to know what kind. Can you please help me identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Ashley F.

Polyphemus Moth laying eggs

Dear Ashley,
It appears as though this Polyphemus Moth has laid some eggs.

Should I feel bad for removing them? I mean it’s such a beautiful moth! But i really don’t want them living in my vehicle…

You can try placing the leaves on one of the following trees identified on BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of broad-leaved trees and shrubs, including birch, grape, hickory, maple, oak, willow, and members of the rose family.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination