Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  VERONA, PA
Date: 06/04/2019
Time: 01:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My first Luna Moth sighting of the year! On the wall at work tonight!
How you want your letter signed:  Rhiannon

Luna Moth

Dear Rhiannon,
Thanks for your comment and your submission.  How marvelous that this was your first Luna Moth sighting of the year, indicating that you have had sightings in years past.  Many of our readers, even those who live within the range of the Luna Moth, are never fortunate enough to experience a sighting of this glorious insect.  Alas, the artificial light under which this image occurred has desaturated the lovely green color of the Luna Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Manhattan, KS
Date: 05/28/2019
Time: 06:30 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this moth on my deck this morning. With wings closed it’s about 1 inch in length.
How you want your letter signed:  Andrea

Honey Locust Moth

Dear Andrea,
This lovely Giant Silkmoth is a Honey Locust Moth,
Syssphinx bicolor, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Range mostly Upper Midwest, less common across se.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pollocksville, NC
Date: 05/11/2019
Time: 03:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
Wondering what type of moth this is. It is huge. Id say almost 4 inches across. Also its been sitting in same place all day. Is it possibly dying? Thank you so much.
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Dawn

Male Imperial Moth

Dear Dawn,
This is a male Imperial Moth.  The female Imperial Moth is lighter in color.  Adult Giant Silkmoths like the Imperial Moth do not feed as adults and they live to mate.  Flying takes energy.  The male flies in search of a mate.  If this male Imperial Moth does not sense a female through her pheromones, he may rest until he senses a nearby female.

Very interesting!  Thank you so much.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Furry moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Courtenay BC
Date: 05/02/2019
Time: 10:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey what kind of moth is this? Its big and furty with fern-like antenea?
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Ceanothus Silkmoth

This is a Giant Silkmoth in the genus Hyalophora, and we are relatively certain that it is the Ceanothus Silkmoth because of the BugGuide description:  “discal spot on hindwing shaped like an elongated comma pointing toward outer margin, sometimes breaking PM line.”  We believe because of the bushy antennae that your individual is a male.

Ceanothus Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification request
Geographic location of the bug:  Frederick area Maryland
Date: 04/28/2019
Time: 07:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello. We saw this today while our walking and are very curious about what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  ?

Rosy Maple Moth

Though your image lacks clarity, this Rosy Maple Moth is readily identifiable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast GA mountain foothills bordering Chattahoochee National Forest.  Elevation about 1500’.
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 01:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this moth 4/25/19 on an outside wall of house not far from a nighttime security light.  The edge of the retracted wings looked like a profile of a snake head or a fish head complete with an eye & scales. On the wing closer to the body there was a perfect replica of college football’s Texas Longhorn symbol, color & all.  The body & feet looked like a hugely engorged giant tick.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you for identifying & providing any info on this moth, as well as it’s caterpillar stage, Steve.

Tulip-Tree Silkmoth, we believe

Dear Steve,
We believe your Giant Silkmoth is a Tulip-Tree Silkmoth,
Callosamia angulifera, based on this BugGuide image, though there are several closely related species that look similar that are also found in Georgia.  BugGuide also has images of its caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination