Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Attacus Caesar Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Cebu
Date: 02/07/2018
Time: 11:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I am a moth enthusiast, I believe that this is an Attacus Caesar moth.  It has landed on my diving vest, on my balcony at the edge of the jungle in Northern Cebu, Philippines.
How you want your letter signed:  HABSgirl

Attacus philippina species

Dear HABSgirl,
According to The Saturniidae of the Philippines, there are four species in the genus
Attacus reported from The Philippines:  “Attacus atlas (Linnaeus, 1758), Attacus caesar Maassen, 1873, Attacus lorquinii C. & R. Felder, 1861, Attacus lemairei Peigler, 1985” but the site does not provide any images.  Of the images posted to Philippine Lepidoptera, the species that look most like your individual are male Attacus lemairei and Attacus lorquinii, though both seem to exhibit considerable variability.   The location of your sighting might not be a factor because according to zobodat:  “these huge species are very popular with amateur entomologists and traders, easy to rear (and regularly reared in big numbers), traded in large numbers (but not at all en­dangered thereby), polyphagous and usually capable to survive in secondary and agricultural landscape of the non-industrial type, and obviously will thrive well under tropical and subtropical climate nearly everywhere in the wild in SE Asia. This, consequently, may well have resulted in several popula­tions being set free in the wild at the ‘wrong’ places, often in or near cities.”  That stated, we are turning to Bill Oehlke to enlist his expertise.

Bill Oehlke Responds: 
Daniel,
I am not sure but I would go with Attacus philippina, which, at one time, was considered a synonym of lorquinii. Second choice would be lorquinii.
Bill

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth on my wall
Geographic location of the bug:  Highland CA
Date: 01/31/2018
Time: 01:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We’ve seen two of these in the past two weeks. This is a picture of the first one. We found wings a few days after it left that look like they have the same pattern. It was rainy when we found the wings. We believe a bird ate it while it was at our door. It has feathery antennae and a large body.
How you want your letter signed:  Leo Wang

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Leo,
You are quite fortunate to have a population of Ceanothus Silkmoths near your home.  Your speculation that an individual was eaten by a bird is a distinct possibility.  Like other members of the Giant Silkmoth family, adult Ceanothus Silkmoths do not eat, and they live only long enough to mate and procreate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Jupiter Florida
Date: 01/25/2018
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this in my walk today.
I was told it was a pregnant moth. What kind is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Judy from Jupiter

Female Polyphemus Moth

Dear Judy,
You were told correct information.  This is a female Polyphemus Moth and she is indeed filled with eggs.  Like other members of her Giant Silkmoth family Saturniidae, the female emerges from the pupal state filled with eggs and ready to mate.  Moths in this family do not eat as adults.  They live for a few days, long enough to mate and reproduce.  We hope you had the opportunity to observe the dorsal surface of her wings, as there are large eyespots on the underwings that are used to startle birds or other predators into perceiving that they are about to be eaten by a much larger creature when they try to eat this tasty morsel.

Thank you so much for the information.
It is always a good day when you learn something new.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth with transparent triangles
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama, Cerro Punta
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 01:39 AM EDT
Just sharing this beauty Rothschildia orizaba
How you want your letter signed:  Mr

Giant Silkmoth: Rothschildia species

Dear Mr,
According to the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, there are six similar looking Giant Silkmoth species from the genus
Rothschildia found in Panama.  While this might be Rothschildia orizaba, we are leaning more towards Rothschildia fabiani.

Very interesting, thanks for the clarification

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Deformed Luna Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  High Springs, Fl.
Date: 09/21/2017
Time: 07:05 PM EDT
I’m still not sure what I was seeing here but it looks to me like a Luna moth that didn’t enclose completely. It was crawling but obviously couldn’t fly. It kept falling over weeds and flipping onto It’s back so I put it on my oak tree and it energetically crawled far up the trunk.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth C.

Newly Eclosed Male Luna Moth

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a newly eclosed male Luna Moth, but we do not believe it is deformed.  Metamorphosis is a process that takes time.  After the adult Luna Moth emerges from the cocoon, it might take several hours for the wings to expand fully and harden.  We suspect your individual eventually flew away to mate.  Because of your kindness, you may have helped this guy survive, so we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth maybe?
Location: Texas
August 21, 2017 8:28 pm
Saw this side climbing on my porch
Signature: Mp

Newly Eclosed Luna Moth

Dear Mp,
This is a freshly eclosed Luna Moth, meaning it has just emerged from its pupal stage and its wings have not yet expanded in functional wings that allow adult Luna Moths to fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination