Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth with transparent triangles
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama, Cerro Punta
Date: 10/28/2017
Time: 01:39 AM EDT
Just sharing this beauty Rothschildia orizaba
How you want your letter signed:  Mr

Giant Silkmoth: Rothschildia species

Dear Mr,
According to the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, there are six similar looking Giant Silkmoth species from the genus
Rothschildia found in Panama.  While this might be Rothschildia orizaba, we are leaning more towards Rothschildia fabiani.

Very interesting, thanks for the clarification

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Deformed Luna Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  High Springs, Fl.
Date: 09/21/2017
Time: 07:05 PM EDT
I’m still not sure what I was seeing here but it looks to me like a Luna moth that didn’t enclose completely. It was crawling but obviously couldn’t fly. It kept falling over weeds and flipping onto It’s back so I put it on my oak tree and it energetically crawled far up the trunk.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth C.

Newly Eclosed Male Luna Moth

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a newly eclosed male Luna Moth, but we do not believe it is deformed.  Metamorphosis is a process that takes time.  After the adult Luna Moth emerges from the cocoon, it might take several hours for the wings to expand fully and harden.  We suspect your individual eventually flew away to mate.  Because of your kindness, you may have helped this guy survive, so we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth maybe?
Location: Texas
August 21, 2017 8:28 pm
Saw this side climbing on my porch
Signature: Mp

Newly Eclosed Luna Moth

Dear Mp,
This is a freshly eclosed Luna Moth, meaning it has just emerged from its pupal stage and its wings have not yet expanded in functional wings that allow adult Luna Moths to fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Spotsylvania, VA
August 21, 2017 7:57 pm
My husband spotted this insect. Its antennae are characteristics of moths but the wings appear to be held vertically which I think is more commonly found in butterflies. It has some markings of a luna moth but the color is very different and seems to lack other luna moth features. Thanks!
Signature: Kim

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Kim,
The feathery antennae indicate that this Polyphemus Moth is a male.  Hopefully you and your husband had an opportunity to view the impressive eyespots that adorn the upper surface of the underwings of Polyphemus Moths.  Reported from all 48 continental United States, the Polyphemus Moth is a very wide ranging species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty moth
Location: Madison GA
August 19, 2017 5:28 am
Hello! I took this photo 8/18/17. Never seen anything like it — Very colorful!! Thank you!
Signature: Lynn, Tallahassee FL

Rosy Maple Moth

Dear Lynn,
This pretty moth is a Rosy Maple Moth.  According to BugGuide:  “Distinctive pink and cream-colored moth. If it weren’t so common, it would generate greater excitement–it is so beautiful” and “Caterpillar hostplants are maples (
Acer), sycamore (Platanus), beech (Fagus) or oaks, (Quercus).  Adults do not feed.”

Thank you so much for your speedy response. I’ve never seen anything like it – thought it was a flower or a piece of candy. I very much appreciate what you do

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lucky Nighttime find an Imperial!
Location: Near St. Louis, MO
August 9, 2017 11:09 pm
I found this beautiful female Imperial Moth. Absolutely stunning! She was having a hard time flying and was battering herself against a corner. I quickly scooped her up (got a few quick photos) and released her into our wooded area out back. I was even lucky enough to observe her warming up her wings! My question is…what is the large spot on the top of her head? It appeared to have less hair than the rest of her body.
Signature: Fayla

Female Imperial Moth

Dear Fayla,
The tattered wings on your female Imperial Moth indicates she has probably neared the end of her very short life.  The hairlike scales on her thorax have worn away which is revealing the exoskeleton, and that is the “spot” you noticed.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination