Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Irene, Pretoria, South Africa
Date: 02/08/2019
Time: 12:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this unusually large moth in the house late in summer and managed to get a good photo.
How you want your letter signed:  Megan

Giant Silkmoth is Speckled Emperor: Gynanisa maja

Dear Megan,
This gorgeous Moth is a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae and thanks to African Moths, we have identified it as
Gynanisa maja, the Speckled Emperor.  The species is also pictured on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Epias muscosa?
Geographic location of the bug:  La Merced, Chanchamayo Province, Junin, Peru
Date: 01/30/2019
Time: 09:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have several images of various moths from a trip near La Merced, Peru for blacklighting. This first one is the easiest as I’m near certain it is Epias muscosa – it is always good to get consensus though.
Thanks in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin

American Silkworm Moth

Dear Kevin,
Your images are beautiful with many fine details, and except for what we believe is a spelling error, we agree with your identification that this is an American Silkworm Moth,
Epia muscosa, which is pictured on iNaturalist and Encyclopedia of Life, and FlickR has many nice images of living specimens.  The bushy antennae indicate that your individual is a male.

American Silkworm Moth

Many, many thanks!
And yes, I meant to spell the genus as Epia.
Might I float one more image in your direction?
Thanks again!
Kevin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  indiana USA
Date: 11/06/2018
Time: 04:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this dead moth in my garage. it’s big and beautiful. I am pretty sure it’s a luna moth however this one is all white and not green like the photos I’ve seen on the internet…. So the question is …. is it really a luna moth or does it turn white when it’s dead and dried up?
How you want your letter signed:  dszig

Luna Moth

Dear dszig,
There is much variation in the color of a Luna Moth.  Some individuals are very green while others are quite pale.  Mounted Luna Moths in collections are often quite faded, and we suspect light might cause the coloration to fade.  A faded Luna Moth is pictured on the Manitoba Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I believe  it’s a moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Uganda,Kampala.
Date: 09/25/2018
Time: 07:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What  is the  name of this moth.
How you want your letter signed:  None

Giant Silkmoth: Ludia species

This is a Giant Silkmoth in the genus Ludia, but we located four different, similar looking species ( Ludia dentata, Ludia hansali eximia, Ludia orinoptena, Ludia pupillata)  on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, so we cannot say for certain to which species your individual belongs.  FlickR has an image of Ludia dentata for comparison and Silkmoths and More has an image of Ludia orinoptena.

Giant Silkmoth: Ludia species

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth Outside Our Classroom Door
Geographic location of the bug:  Orlando, FL 32803
Date: 08/27/2018
Time: 04:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
We found this amazing moth outside our classroom and we would love to find out which species it is.  This is our fifth grade class at Orlando Gifted Academy.
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Mrs. Kuerzi’s and Mr. Burnett’s Sudents

Female Io Moth

Dear Mrs. Keurzi’s and Mr. Burnett’s Students,
This impressive moth is a female Io Moth, but she has hidden her most dramatic feature while resting.  If disturbed by a predator like a bird, the Io Moth opens its wings, revealing the colorful eyespots on its underwings, often startling the predator into perceiving a threat that might eat it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth or butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Greenville, SC
Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 06:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We heard this guy flapping his wings between a wall and bookshelf in the garage. I moved the bookshelf to find him very sluggish. He wasn’t interested in flying away and when he triwd, he didn’t get far. We slid him onto some paper and transferred him to the tree. He has since flown off. He might have been traumatized. Girls say butterfly, adults are leaning towards moth. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Pedro Aponte

Female Tuliptree Silkmoth

Dear Pedro,
Adults are correct in this matter, however this is not a “guy” but rather a female Giant Silkmoth in the genus
Callosamia, probably a Tuliptree Silkmoth, Callosamia angulifera which is pictured on BugGuide.  Male Giant Silkmoths have more feathery antennae that they use to locate females that release pheromones.  Giant Silkmoths only live a few days as adults, long enough to mate and reproduce, so your assistance in releasing this Tuliptree Silkmoth back into nature garners you the Bug Humanitarian tag on the posting. Do you have a tuliptree near your garage?  It is possible that the mature caterpillar left the host tree and found a secluded location to form a cocoon and to pupate, and that location was behind the bookshelf.  Then we she emerged, she found herself trapped.

Female Tuliptree Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination