Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"

Subject:  Red moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Conyers Georgia
Date: 09/24/2021
Your letter to the bugman:  What kind of moth is this
How you want your letter signed:  J Lowry

Pink Striped Oakworm Moth

Dear J Lowry,
This is an Oakworm Moth in the genus Anisota, probably the Pink Striped Oakworm Moth,
Anisota virginiensis, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject:  Lepodopteran identification request
Geographic location of the bug:  USA, California, 12 km west of Bishop in the Sierra Nevada Mts.
Date: 09/21/2021
Time: 04:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Came across several of these emerging on August 30, 2021.  Just wondering about the identity of this beauty?
How you want your letter signed:  Frank Baele

Hera Buckmoth

Dear Frank,
This is one of the Buckmoths in the genus
Hemileuca, and we believe it is most likely the Hera Buckmoth, Hemileuca hera, which is pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “Caterpillars feed on basin big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and sand sagebrush (A. filifolia). Adults do not feed.”

Hera Buckmoth

Hey Daniel, that is great! Much appreciation.  Frank Baele

Subject:  It’s a Luna
Geographic location of the bug:  Woodsfield Ohio
Date: 08/02/2021
Time: 12:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I already identified these two, but I wanted to share them as we recently purchased the property where I saw them.
How you want your letter signed:  Xero

Luna Moths

Dear Xero,
You are so fortunate to have purchased a property that is home to Luna Moths.  According to BugGuide:  “The caterpillars eat a variety of trees including white birch (
Betula papyrifera), persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua), hickories (Carya), walnuts (Juglans), pecans, and sumacs (Rhus).”  We suspect one or more of those trees are growing on your property.  Daniel is in Ohio for two more weeks and he is hoping he will have the opportunity to finally witness a Luna Moth in the wild.  There is a persimmon tree on the property that was planted long after Daniel moved away in 1979, so perhaps this year he will get lucky,

Subject:  Luna Moth 2.0
Geographic location of the bug:  Woodsfield Ohio
Date: 08/04/2021
Time: 03:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this guy in my front yard today. Looks like he’s been through hell with the birds around here. He’s still a wonderful site to behold and I’m glad that the Luna’s around here have decided to shelter around my house.
(No i.d. Necessary reposted here to attach pic)
How you want your letter signed:  Xero

Luna Moth

Dear Xero,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a very tattered female Luna Moth.  Her narrow antennae indicate she is a female.  We hope she mated and laid at least some of her several hundred eggs.  Daniel is currently in Ohio and he hopes he has an opportunity to observe a Luna Moth in the wild, something he has never yet experienced. 

Subject:  Two insects or one?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bend, Oregon
Date: 07/19/2021
Time: 12:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen in the evening, July 19, 2021, Bend, Oregon. Nudged it to see if it was two separate bugs but it didn’t separate.
How you want your letter signed:  Julie

Buck Moth we believe

Dear Julie,
This is a Moth but we can’t see enough detail to provide you with a definitive species (or family) identification, but we believe this may be a Buck Moth in the genus
Hemileuca.  One highly variable species, the Elegant Sheep Moth, is pictured on the Moth PHotographers Group site.  It is also possible this might be a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.

Subject:  ANTHERAEA OCULEA MOTH
Geographic location of the bug:  PAYSON, AZ
Date: 07/24/2021
Time: 04:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I noticed red stripes along wings and other pictures have no red. Is this a male or female
How you want your letter signed:  SUSIE COOKE

Oculea Moth

Dear Susie,
Thanks for submitting your image of a male Oculea Moth or Western Polyphemus Moth.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are also similar to A. polyphemus, but darker and with more markings around the eye spots. ‘Upperside of wings is tan, sometimes with a yellowish or reddish tint. Forewing margin is the same color as the basal area; submarginal line is black. Rings around the eyespots are orange, blue, and black. Underside has contrasting rust, brown, and white markings.’ – Butterflies and Moths of North America”

Thank you for the information! Love your site