Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth or butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Greenville, SC
Date: 08/11/2018
Time: 06:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We heard this guy flapping his wings between a wall and bookshelf in the garage. I moved the bookshelf to find him very sluggish. He wasn’t interested in flying away and when he triwd, he didn’t get far. We slid him onto some paper and transferred him to the tree. He has since flown off. He might have been traumatized. Girls say butterfly, adults are leaning towards moth. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Pedro Aponte

Female Tuliptree Silkmoth

Dear Pedro,
Adults are correct in this matter, however this is not a “guy” but rather a female Giant Silkmoth in the genus
Callosamia, probably a Tuliptree Silkmoth, Callosamia angulifera which is pictured on BugGuide.  Male Giant Silkmoths have more feathery antennae that they use to locate females that release pheromones.  Giant Silkmoths only live a few days as adults, long enough to mate and reproduce, so your assistance in releasing this Tuliptree Silkmoth back into nature garners you the Bug Humanitarian tag on the posting. Do you have a tuliptree near your garage?  It is possible that the mature caterpillar left the host tree and found a secluded location to form a cocoon and to pupate, and that location was behind the bookshelf.  Then we she emerged, she found herself trapped.

Female Tuliptree Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth??
Geographic location of the bug:  Douglasville, GA
Date: 07/31/2018
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this??
How you want your letter signed:  Natalie

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Natalie,
This is a male Polyphemus Moth, a species reported on BugGuide from most of the continental United States and Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Marietta, GA
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 07:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in backyard. It has 6 legs, white and fuzzy with green sections on its tail. It resembles a catapilar, but it’s legs are more roach-like and thick.  It has small wings that look almost useless.
How you want your letter signed:  Brian

Freshly Eclosed Luna Moth

Dear Brian,
This is a newly eclosed Luna Moth, meaning it has just emerged from its cocoon, and because its wings have not yet fully expanded and hardened, allowing it to fly, it still maintains the appearance of a caterpillar, somewhat.  A mature Luna Moth is arguably the loveliest North American moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Shepherdstown, WV
Date: 07/20/2018
Time: 12:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found him in the rocks
How you want your letter signed:  Todd Fagan

Royal Walnut Moth

Dear Todd,
This gorgeous moth is a Royal Walnut Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Danbury Ct
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 10:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this large interesting moth?
How you want your letter signed:  David

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear David,
This is a male Polyphemus Moth.  The Polyphemus Moth is even more impressive in its defense posture of exposing the large eyespots on its underwings, which might startle a predator into thinking it has disturbed a much larger creature capable of eating the predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown critter
Geographic location of the bug:  Tallahassee Florida
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 10:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there,
Never seen this particular insect.  Would appreciate some insights.  It was rather cool looking even if a bit ferocious.  Thank you so much.
How you want your letter signed:  Dan Moore

Newly Eclosed Imperial Moth

Dear Dan,
This is a newly eclosed Imperial Moth.  Its wings have not yet expanded and hardened after emerging from the pupa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination