Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Interesting Moth Find
Geographic location of the bug:  Suburban town in Connecticut, USA
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 09:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth (?) was found in early June on a warm, sunny day on the playground of a elementary school in Connecticut. I could not capture a better photo before it flew away, however it was VERY large. Out of curiosity, I did some research to identify the moth but had no luck. The only related species that I found were Atlas moths, but none were inhabitants of the area or displayed such interesting markings. Any ideas what this bug could be?
How you want your letter signed:  Moth Mystified

Cecropia Moth

Dear Moth Mystified,
This magnificent moth is a male Cecropia Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Illinois
Date: 06/09/2018
Time: 05:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What type of bug is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Kate

Newly Eclosed Female Polyphemus Moth

Dear Kate,
This is a newly eclosed (just emerged from the pupa) Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae, and its wings have not yet fully expanded.  The antennae indicates it is a female.  Of the species represented on the Illinois Department of Natural Resources site, it looks most like a Polyphemus Moth.
  The TYWKIWDBI site has images to support that identification.  The Polyphemus Moth has very impressive eyespots on the underwings (not visible in your image) that are used to frighten predators.

Thank you so much! I did take another look 15 minutes later and the wings had grown with large dots just as you described. Your time is greatly appreciated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Silk moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica, Montezuma
Date: 05/25/2018
Time: 10:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! I would like to know the species of this Huge moth i saw in a Hotel in Costa Rica. It was as big as mt Hand.
How you want your letter signed:  Mathilde

Giant Silkmoth: Arsenura archianassa

Dear Mathilde,
We are quite certain your Giant Silkmoth is in the genus
Arsenura, and we believe it is Arsenura archianassa based on images we located on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, though it might be a different species.  There is a mounted specimen pictured on Bold Systems.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can confirm the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge weird moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Western washington
Date: 05/10/2018
Time: 03:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a very interesting huge moth/butterfly? Do I catch it or kills or let it go?
How you want your letter signed:  Bobbi

Male Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Bobbi,
This is a male Ceanothus Silkmoth and they are currently flying in western states.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  It is harmless and you should let it be.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pittsburgh,PA
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 10:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Here’s the ‘little’ guy.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi

Luna Moth

Dear Naomi,
Thanks for your comment and also for submitting your image.  This is our first Luna Moth sighting this year.  Generally we received our first sighting report in late January or February and that sighting comes from the south, including Texas and Georgia, and as spring moves north, the sightings continue, including sightings from Maine in June.  We are curious why there is such a dearth of Luna Moth sightings this spring. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Nevada City, Ca
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 10:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please tell us what this moth is?
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Nancy,
This is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, and ironically, you have an image of the moth on a lilac.  Adult Ceanothus Silkmoths do not feed, but the food plant of the caterpillar is the Ceanothus, commonly called a California lilac, which is not related to the blooming lilac in your image.  The antennae on your individual leads us to believe it is a male.

Ceanothus Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination