Currently viewing the category: "Ghost Moths and Wood Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown insect
Location: NJ shore
July 13, 2017 9:46 am
Any idea what this is?
Signature: Larry

Wood Leopard Moth

Dear Larry,
This is a Wood Leopard Moth, not to be confused with the Giant Leopard Moth that looks very similar but is not related.  According to BugGuide:  “Unlike the Giant Leopard Moth, this one is not native to the US. Supposedly introduced (from its native Europe?) in mid-1800s; first reported in North America at Hoboken, New Jersey in 1882.  It is considered a pest of some fruit trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cheers
Location: North ga
June 6, 2017 6:50 pm
A beauty
Signature: Ribbit

Carpenterworm Moth

Dear Ribbit,
This is a Carpenterworm Moth,
Prionoxystus robiniae, our featured Bug of the Month this month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown Sphinx moth
Location: Carrboro ,NC
May 31, 2017 8:53 pm
Found this large Sphinx moth on my front porch last night in Carrboro NC. My best thoughts were it might be a Rustic Sphinx moth.
Signature: Mary S

Carpenterworm Moth

Dear Mary,
Though it resembles a Sphinx Moth, this is actually a Carpenterworm Moth,
Prionoxystus robiniae, in the family Cossidae, which we verified by matching your individual to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae bore in wood of living deciduous trees: locust, oak, chestnut, poplar, willow, maple, and ash.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Large, might be mistaken for a sphinx moth. ”  We will be featuring your posting as our Bug of the Month for June 2017.

Carpenterworm Moth

Wow, Thanks! I wasn’t even thinking of any moth outside of a sphinx…this girl was big! Thanks so much Daniel.
Mary

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is it?
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 1, 2016 3:20 am
Hi, recently after bringing in the washing a giant moth like bug rose out of my washing. I wish I had taken a photo. It looked nearly as big as my hand.. like a big mottley black/greyish moth type creature. It’s wings moved a bit and it walked around. It’s body was dark and very solid from what I saw. I was hoping for a few suggestions? To lead me in the right direction. I’ve never seen a bug like that my whole life. The picture I put with it was similar, but the one I saw was darker.
Signature: Tiana

Wood Moth, we believe

Wood Moth, we believe

Dear Tiana,
This is either a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae (see ButterflyHouse) or a Wood Moth in the family Cossidae (see ButterflyHouse) and we believe it looks like the Wood Moth
Endoxyla secta that is pictured on Butterfly House.  We did make the Giant Wood Moth our Bug of the Month for December.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Brisbane
November 30, 2016 3:46 am
Huge moth dog was trying to get. Was wondering what it is?
Signature: Shaun

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Dear Shaun,
We believe this is a Giant Wood Moth in the family Cossidae, possibly Endoxyla macleayi which is pictured on Butterfly House, though there are other similar looking species in the same genus.  We would not rule out that it might be a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae, a very similar looking family that is well represented on Butterfly House, and we should also point out that other members of the family Cossidae are represented on Butterfly House.  We have difficulty distinguishing between the two families.  Caterpillars of Wood Moths are known as Witchety Grubs.  Because of your timely submission, we have selected this posting as our Bug of the Month for December 2016.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this before
Location: Lancaster County
July 11, 2016 8:17 am
Found this on my flag this morning. Have never seen this before? Please enlighten.
Signature: James DeBord

Wood Leopard Moth

Wood Leopard Moth

Dear James,
Where is Lancaster County?  If you are in UK, this is a native species.  If you are in Pennsylvania or North Carolina, this is an introduced species.  It is a Wood Leopard Moth,
Zeuzera pyrina, and according to BugGuide:  “Supposedly introduced (from its native Europe?) in mid-1800s; first reported in North America at Hoboken, New Jersey in 1882.  It is considered a pest of some fruit trees.” 

Yes sorry, I didn’t specify. Pennsylvania. Thanks for the info. I have never seen one before in all my years in PA.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination