Currently viewing the category: "Ghost Moths and Wood Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Wood Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Black Rock, Melbourne
Date: 12/10/2018
Time: 04:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think these are Endoxyla cinereus, and I assume they are mating? Some students of mine found these in the school playground – absolutely fascinated. The CSIRO page still doesn’t show it as present in Victoria, so perhaps it is something else?
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew P

Mating Wood Moths

Dear Andrew,
We agree that these are mating Wood Moths in the family Cossidae, but we cannot confirm the exact species with any certainty.  We often have trouble differentiating members of this family, and we also confuse members of this family with the Ghost Moths or Swift Moths in the family Hepialidae, which are pictured on Butterfly House.  While we would not rule out that this might be
Endoxyla cinereus, which is pictured on Butterfly House, we can state that it really resembles the individual we posted earlier today that we believe is a Wattle Goat Moth, Endoxyla encalypti.

Mating Wood Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified large Australian Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Recliffe Peninsua, Queensland, Australia
Date: 12/09/2018
Time: 07:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I snapped this beauty outside a fish and chip shop on the weekend, taking a rest on a kerb, which would make it about 15cm from front legs to wing tips. I have no idea what sort it is, though, and haven’t seen one before. Can you help? It would be good to put a name to the face, as it were.
How you want your letter signed:  Joshua

Wattle Goat Moth, we believe

Dear Joshua,
This appears to be one of the Wood Moths or Goat Moths in the family Cossidae, possibly the Wattle Goat Moth,
Endoxyla encalypti, which is pictured on Butterfly House where it states:  “The adult moths have forewings that are speckled grey and brown with indistinct light and dark streaks. The hindwings are reddish-brown at the base, fading to grey-brown at the margins. The wingspan is around 10 cms.  The thorax of the adult moth has an uncanny likeness to the head of a mouse! The ‘eyes’ of the mouse are the thicker parts of the bluish lines running on either side of the thorax, located just behind the real eyes.”

Thanks Daniel. The wingspan of this individual was definitely greater than 10cm, but that does look a very close match. Appreciate the help!
Josh

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Bruny Island, Tasmania
Date: 05/18/2018
Time: 03:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth came to our patio lights when on vacation in Tasmania in 2008. Been trying ever since to find its ID.
How you want your letter signed:  Stephen Smith

Rain Moth

Dear Stephen,
Though it resembles a Hawkmoth, this is a member of a different family, Hepialidae, the Ghost Moths or Swift Moths.  We believe we have correctly identified it as
Abantiades atripalpis, a Rain Moth or Waikerie, thanks to images posted to Butterfly House where it states:  “The moths have grey-brown wings, often with two ragged silver flash markings across each forewing. The forewings often also show intricate sinuous patterns of pale lines. The wingspan of the males can reach 12 cms. That of the females can reach 16 cms.  The adult females deposit large numbers of eggs. Indeed, this species holds the World Fecundity Record, for the greatest number of eggs being deposited by a non-social insect. One dissected female had 44,100 eggs. It is thought that the eggs are laid in flight, just being scattered across the ground.” 

Many thanks, I’ve quite a few Australian moth photo’s as yet unidentified. If you don’t mind I’ll post more in the future as I work my way through them.
Regards Steve.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica, pacific side, in the mountians
Date: 01/27/2018
Time: 11:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman. Came across this awesome Critter in Costa Rica at first it look like a strange furry cicada but after having him walk on my hand I do believe he was a moth?
How you want your letter signed:  Kat

Wood Moth we believe

Dear Kat,
We believe this is a Wood Moth or Carpenter Moth in the family Cossidae, but we have not had any luck locating a definitive matching image online with a species identification.  We did locate this similar looking individual on FlickR and Butterflies and Moths of North America has some similar looking but not exact images on their site where it states:  “Adults are robust and heavy-bodied, and are typically nocturnal, drab, and mostly gray with black markings. Females are often much larger than males. Eggs are usually laid in crevices or under bark with an extensible ovipositor, and may be produced in vast numbers. Larvae bore into branches or trunks of living shrubs or trees, sometimes causing considerable damage, and require 1 to 4 years to mature.”  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wondering if there is a name for this gentle giant
Geographic location of the bug:  Condell Park, New South Wales, Australia
Date: 01/15/2018
Time: 05:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was working the night shift and came across this gentle giant and was just wondering if it had a specific name?
Besides Moth😏
How you want your letter signed:  Kindest Regards Ray

Probably Ghost Moth

Dear Ray,
We believe this is a Wood Moth or Goat Moth from the family Cossidae, a group well represented on Butterfly House, but we would not discount that it might be a Ghost Moth or Swift Moth from the family Hepialidae, also well represented on Butterfly House.  We not only have trouble distinguishing the families apart, we also have problems with actual species identifications.  The larvae of Wood Moths are frequently called Witchetty Grubs. 

Hello,
Just wanted to take the time to say thank you for your reply!
It is greatly appreciated
Kindest Regards
Ray Davis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: any clue
Location: North East New Jersey (W Milford)
July 13, 2017 11:09 am
Are you able to identify this … taken today.
Signature: Julie

Wood Leopard Moth

Dear Julie,
This is the second image of a Wood Leopard Moth from New Jersey that we are posting today.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination