Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"

Subject: Salta Moths
Location: Salta, Argentina
December 15, 2015 10:26 am
Brown banded moth.
Signature: JC

Moth

Moth

Hi again Julio,
We are guessing that this might be a moth in the family Geometridae.

Daniel,
Thank you. I will send you another one now. A more colourful one so that your readership enjoys it!!! Good w-e. Regards. JC

Subject: Wingless moth..?
Location: Massachusetts
November 27, 2015 7:13 am
I found these 2 moths seemingly mating on top of my shoe last night !! I always call these “winter moths” since they come out in December but I would like more information on maybe why this ones wings are gone? Is one sex flightless? Or did something happen to it? – sorry about the photo quality, my camera would not focus on them.
Signature: Ali

Mating Fall Cankerworm Moths

Mating Fall Cankerworm Moths

Dear Ali,
It is unfortunate that the point of focus is your shoelace, and not the moths, but we believe these are mating Winter Moths,
Operophtera brumata, an introduced species with wingless females and winged males, and the males resemble the individual in your image based on this BugGuide image.  The general appearance of the moths, the time of the sighting and your location are all consistent with what we know about Winter Moths.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Europe, introduced to Northeast and Pacific Northwest, pest species in areas such as Boston. Established in the NW since the 1970s” and “adult males seen October to February and often attracted to lights”  We should point out that other species in the family Geometridae also have flightless female moths, including the Fall Cankerworm Moth, Alsophila pometaria.  According to BugGuide:  “The females are wingless and stout-bodied, with the body banded dark and pale gray.”  We are amused that your name for these moths is the approved common name. 

Subject: cool moth
Location: Gallup, NM
September 17, 2015 8:35 am
I’ve seen this moth three different times, but finally got a good enough picture to send you. I’d like to know what it is and what the purpose is for the stick out thingy!
Signature: Cathy P.

Grapevine Looper

Grapevine Looper

Dear Cathy,
This is one of the Grapevine Looper Moths in the genus
Eulithis, possibly the Greater Grapevine Looper which is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Cascades Mountains
June 27, 2015 10:51 am
Hi, I found several black-and-white butterflies flying around some damp soil at the 4200-ft. elevation of Mt. Rainier in Washington state on June 26. I photographed one of them; not a great shot, but I hope it shows the essentials. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks.
Signature: gardenjim

Diurnal Geometrid Moth

Diurnal Geometrid Moth

Dear gardenjim,
This is not a butterfly, but a diurnal Geometrid Moth in the genus
RheumapteraBased on this BugGuide image, we believe it may be Rheumaptera subhastata, but it may be a different species, because according to BugGuide:  “The variation in pattern among individuals of R. hastata and R. subhastata is much greater than the variation between the two species. … Since these two species have virtually identical geographic ranges, examination of genitalia is the only reliable way to separate the two.”

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
June 9, 2015 6:12 am
Hi!
I found this bug in my backyard and I was wondering what species it is? It is fairly common flying around and feeding on the lilac bush. I have searched several bug databases and I am unable to find the name of it. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Thank you
Signature: Jordan Skaarup

Diurnal Geometrid Moth

Diurnal Geometrid Moth

Dear Jordan,
We believe we have correctly identified you diurnal Geometrid Moth as belonging to the genus
Rheumaptera based on this BugGuide image.

Subject: What type of moth is this?
Location: Campbell, CA
May 15, 2015 9:28 am
This moth is on my kitchen door. White for camouflage I’m assuming. It’s about 1 -1/2 inches from wing tip to wing tip. Soft fur on head. It looks like a stealth bomber. Very beautiful. May have black legs, small horizontal antennae.
Signature: Trish

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

Dear Trish,
Your moth is is the family Geometridae, but we are uncertain of the species.
  It may be an Omnivorous Looper, Sabulodes aegrotata, which is pictured on the Moths of Orange County site.