Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"
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Cool Moth
Location:  Eastern Coast Maryland
September 4, 2010 9:35 am
Hello, i was on my lunch break. In annapolis, Maryland when i saw this leaf hanging on the wall. Closer inspection i realized it was an awesome insect but i am unable to find its name
Signature:  Jason

Grapevine Looper Moth

Hi Jason,
We are certain your moth is a Geometrid Moth in the genus
Eulithis, but we are not certain of the species.  We suspect this is the Greater Grapevine Looper, Eulithis gracilineata, which is pictured on BugGuide, though the Lesser Grapevine Looper, Eulithis diversilineata, also pictured on BugGuide, looks quite similar and BugGuide indicates:  “A text description is needed that explains how to reliably distinguish photos of this species from the similar Greater Grapevine Looper (Eulithis gracilineata).

Grapevine Looper Moth

Thankyou so much. That happened so fast. I am almost certain its the grapevine. You guys are so great

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth ID
June 5, 2010
I would greatly appreciate an ID on these moths. The one looked like a cecropia, but I wasn’t sure. I know that patterns can vary considerably depending on location. Thank you!
Andrea
St. Peters PA

Rufous Geometer

Hi Andrea,
We are posting your two identification requests separately, since they represent different moth families.  The yellow moth is a Geometrid moth in the genus Xanthotype, and BugGuide remarks:  “Rindge (1978) examined 1,886 specimens (1441 males, 445 females) and made 261 genitalic dissections. He stated: ‘No one has found a reliable way to recognize the species as yet except by genitalia. The adults of all species in this genus are, for practical purposes, externally indistinguishable from one another, as they are almost identical in color, maculation, and size.’
”  We believe that based on the sighting occurring in Florida, this may be the Rufous Geometer, Xanthotype furaria, because BugGuide also indicates:  “X. rufaria is a southern species; it gets as far north as coastal NC and then follows the coast to Florida and Mississippi. The dot on his map in the mountains of NC seems odd compared with the other dots for this species. It is a specimen from Stone Mountain State Park, Wilkes and Allegheny counties.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

moth in mirror
May 5, 2010
Any idea who this handsome moth admiring him/herself in my bathroom mirror might be? I assume it’s a moth from the elaborate antennae, despite the butterfly-like position. Seemed to be attracted to the nightlight we’d left on.
Sara
central NJ

Tulip Tree Beauty

Dear Sara,
Your lovely moth is one of the Geometrid Moths known as the Tulip Tree Beauty, Epimecis hortaria.  You can read more about it on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Update from Molly
February 27, 2010
Mottled umber moth Sorry to bug you again…….
OK I found a male moth yesterday and put it in the freezer. It doesn’t have the exact color patterns I see on the Internet but it has the same fringe on the bottom of the wings and matches the basic shape of an adult mottled umber moth. This particular moth is one of the more drab looking variations. Get back to me on where I should send the specimen.
Molly
Dunsmuir, CA

Hi Molly,
We hope you can send us a photo of the male moth for our website.  You can contact the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or APHIS at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/about_aphis/ .  In the past, we have had contact with Stephanie Dubon about invasive species.  You can try contacting her via email at npag@aphis.usda.gov .  In California, the USDA is kept pretty busy, and there is an Invasive Pest Website at http://www.hungrypests.com/ and they can be emailed at info@hungrypests.com for additional details.

March 6, 2010
Sorry for the delay. Here’s the pic of the male Mottled umber moth I found. It’s patterns are different than usual but it has the same physical shape. I’m not 100% sure on why, but it may be because it’s in a different environment.

Male Mottled Umber Moth

Hi Molly,
Thanks for sending the photo you believe to be a male Mottled Umber Moth, and invasive species that may be gaining a foothold in California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Blue green moth in Seattle
December 20, 2009
One day several summers ago (July 9, 2005) I looked out the window and saw this beautiful moth. I took lots of terrible pictures of it but got a couple that are ok. I’ve looked around and haven’t been able to identify it. We live in Shoreline, WA, just north of Seattle. There are a lot of douglas fir and cedar trees around, as well as a creek about 100 yards away.
Thank you!
Novice bug watcher
Shoreline, WA

Emerald Moth

Emerald Moth

Dear Novice,
Though we cannot tell you the exact species for certain, we can tell you that this is an Emerald Moth in the subfamily Geometrinae.  The caterpillars are called Inchworms or Spanworms.  You can scan BugGuide for possible species matches.  We would place our money on the Common Emerald, Hemithea aestivaria, which BugGuide reports from Washington and British Columbia.  It is a species that was introduced from Europe, and it is expected that it may continue to expand its range in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Saturniidae/Geometridae?
December 8, 2009
3 moths from Bellavista, Ecuador. Western slope about 2000 m.
I think these are very difficult, but hopefully still possible to identify.
Leif
Bellavista Lodge, Ecuador

Unknown Geometrid Moth #3 from Ecuador

Unknown Geometrid Moth #3 from Ecuador

Dear Leif,
Thanks for sending your photos, but now we are filled with curiosity.  Were these moths photographed on December 8, 2009?  Just how big were they?  Were they attracted to a light?  Insect collectors are taught to provide as much information as possible on those tiny labels, and the same should be true of photographs.  Information will assist in proper identification.  In our amateur opinion, these are in the family Geometridae.

Unknown Geometrid Moth #2

Unknown Geometrid Moth #2 from Ecuador

We are also fascinated by the peripheral insects surrounding one of your specimens, and perhaps one of our readers wants to take a crack at identifying the Lepidoptera and Diptera that are surrounding the larger moth in the middle.  Sadly, just one of these identifications may take hours and hours of research, and a definitive answer just may not be possible.  We just had a nice telephone conversation with Lila Higgins at the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles about the possibility of finding species new to science in the middle of an urban setting being just as probable as scouring the rain forests of South America for an undescribed species.  That gnat-like creature in the upper left corner may be new to science, and should you choose to pursue the taxonomy, it might one day bear your name.  Alas, when we began this posting, and we started to format your images for the web, we didn’t have a clear picture of where our response was going, so the numbering appears out of sync in reverse order.  We are numbering your images and we hope that you will provide additional information in a comment and that you will refer to the numbers attached to the moths.  We also hope that our readership may provide additional information, and now that the photos are numbered, clarity will be maintained.

Unknown Geometrid #1 from Ecuador

Unknown Geometrid Moth #1 from Ecuador

Hi
Thank you for your reply and comment.
Maybe this is too much, but it’s the only serious forum I have found so far.
As an amateur it’s very difficult to give all the correct information. All my moths from Bellavista are photographed on October 19th 2009. They were all attracted to outside lights around some of the buildings at Bellavista Lodge. Sitting on fence posts and the main gate, well actually everywhere. They were really swarming like crazy. Must have been thousands. Heaven for a moth expert I would think. Even for a birder like me!
I’m sorry, but this is really all the additional information I’m able to give. I could, however, try to estimate size. Maybe small, medium and big is too vague?!
Leif

The additional information is great Leif.  We are amateurs ourselves, and we are not even certain if the three moths are the same species.  Sexual dimorphism and individual variation within a species can make some identifications very difficult.  Would you estimate that the three moths were the same size?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination