Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"
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Location:  Mt Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 28, 2011
A few times a year, Emerald Moths in the subfamily Geometrinae come to the porch light.  This is the first individual we have noticed this year.

Emerald

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mystery moth
Location: Southern California
May 9, 2011 12:15 am
Hello WTB,
This beautiful moth was on the wall just outside my front door today. I took a picture of it with my phone and have been trying to look it up online but have not come up with anything that looks like it. Can you tell me what it is??
Signature: thank you , Pamela

Emerald

Hi Pamela,
This is a member of the Geometridae subfamily
Geometrinae commonly called the Emeralds.  This is a large subfamily and most members are described on BugGuide as:  “Small moths named for their delicate green color.”  If you require an exact species identification, you may try browsing through BugGuide for possibilities.  It would seem that the red edges on the wings might be a noteworthy feature for identification purposes.

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is this a moth?
Location: central Nebraska
April 11, 2011 11:19 pm
I found this in my house. He was hanging on to the wall like a cicada, but he can run pretty quickly. Those look like immature wings, but I thought moths came out fully formed. It is the first week of April and this is one of the first insects I’ve seen this year.
Signature: Jerry

Unknown Flightless Female Moth

Hi Jerry,
Congratulations on correctly classifying this as a Moth.  It is a flightless female Moth, though we need some time to attempt to identify the species.  There are many moth species that have flightless females.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide an identification while we are at work today.  As an aside, we get very few identification requests from Nebraska.  We wonder if it is perhaps the Winter Moth,
Operophtera brumata, a species accidentally introduced to North America from Europe.  Here is a photo of the Winter Moth on BugGuide.

Unknown Flightless Female Moth

Daniel
I tend to agree that there is a good possibility that this is a female “Winter Moth” but the question still remains is it the exotic “Winter Moth” Operophtera brumataor one of the native Geometrid “Winter Moths”.  I know that here in the state of Michigan, we are on the look out for the exotic pest and maybe the good folks in Nebraska may be wondering of its establishment in their great state.  Us humans have the ability to help move these exotic species around and this problematic species is established in several states.  Puzzling though is that the adults are out and about from November to January but maybe this one was lucky to over winter indoors?
My Two Cents
Thanks
Brian
United States Department of Agriculture

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Costa Rican Geometrid/Bad-wing? Moth by La Paz Waterfall Garden
Location: Costa Rica
January 23, 2011 12:54 am
Hi. I shot a photo of a moth last May (May 10, 2010) of a moth which reminded me of a geometrid in shape,or very similar to a Dyspteris but with metallic Blue/Green forewing and black hindwing. The trailing edge of all 4 wings is cream colored. The body is ”fuzzy” and orange and the antennae are whiplike, not feathery. It was located on a railing near a light close to where I was eating breakfast on the ”Orchid Terrace” Restaurant. The surrounding environs were open field and secondary cloud forest with an altitude of about 1400-1600 meters above sea level. I was at La Paz Waterfall Gardens. Their Lat and Long are:Latitude 10.12.6.28 N
Longitude 84.9.41.23 W
Signature: Joyous C, Long Island, NY

Unknown Moth from Costa Rica

Dear Joyous,
We haven’t the time to research this at the moment, but perhaps one of our readers will provide an answer and comment while we are at work today.

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strange moth bends over backwards
Location: SE Pennsylvania
November 2, 2010 11:12 am
I found this moth on the ice chest at work in southeast Pennsylvania in early August. What is it called, and what is with the strange pose? My back hurts just looking at it. Thank you.
Signature: Phil

Greater Grapevine Looper

Hi Phil,
This is either a Greater Grapevine Looper,
Eulithis gracilineata, or Eulithis diversilineata, or a closely related species in the genus.  You can read about the Greater Grapevine Looper on BugGuide. Eulithis diversilineata is also pictured on BugGuide. We are going to take tremendous creative license and call this an Acrobat Moth so that we can easily locate it in our archives when needed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ecuadorian hawkmoth
Location:  Ecuador
October 17, 2010 6:38 pm
I photographed this stunning hawkmoth at Cabanas San Isidro on the east slope of the Andes on July 4, 2002. Any idea what species it might be?
Signature:  Allen Chartier

Unknown Moth from Ecuador

Dear Allen,
This is a stunning moth, but we are not certain it is a Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  The head appears different from most Hawkmoths.  We have an important writing deadline to meet this evening, so we need to stop trying to identify this moth for the moment.  In our initial attempts, we were unable to identify this species on the Sphingidae of Ecuador web page on Bill Oehlke’s awesome Sphingidae of the Americas website in a quick search.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information.  Our readership might have ideas as well.

Thanks! No hurry…I’ve had this photo for three years. I also have a number of other unidentified moths on my website from the same locale and trip to Ecuador. If anyone is interested in identifying them too, at their own convenience, I’d really appreciate it and would be willing to upload any of them to
What’s That Bug?
Go to: http://www.amazilia.net/images/Inverts/Lepidoptera/Moths/moths.htm and scroll down to the South America section…
Allen T. Chartier

Identification Courtesy of Karl
December 14, 2012
Hi Daniel:
This one goes back some, but I came across an online photo recently as I was identifying some of my own moth photos from Ecuador and I immediately recognized it as one I had once tried (unsuccessfully) to identify for WTB. This is not a sphingid, but rather a geometrid moth. The common name appears to be ‘The Magician’, although it seems too obscure to have a common name. The scientific name is Monarcha magicaria (Geometridae: Larentiinae). I also found it as Psaliodes magicaria (again, subfamily Larentiinae), but I was not able to determine which generic designation is currently valid for this species. As far as I can tell it occurs only in Ecuador. Regards.  Karl

Thanks again Karl for your assistance with The Magician.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination