Currently viewing the category: "Clearwings"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Subject:  LobsterWasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Oregon
Date: 07/03/2019
Time: 11:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found on several cannabis leaves and neighboring foliage.
How you want your letter signed:  DB

Strawberry Crown Moth on Cannabis

Dear DB,
This is one of the Wasp Mimic Moths or Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae.  We believe we have identified it as a Strawberry Crown Moth,
Synanthedon bibionipennis, thanks to images on BugGuide.  Were there strawberry plants nearby?  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae bore in the roots near the crown or in the stems near the base of various species in the Rose family (Fragaria, Rosa, Rubus, Potentilla). Considered to be a pest of strawberries. Adults take nectar from many different flowers.”  Since Cannabis is not in the Rose family Rosaceae, we suspect your plant is safe from this Strawberry Crown Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please Identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Oregon, Outside Eugene
Date: 03/11/2019
Time: 11:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beauty while visiting a local lake in 2017.  It didn’t attempt to fly away the entire time we were there, and seemed unfazed when I stuck a phone camera several inches from its face.   I was afraid it was dead, but it was still moving a bit.  Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Dan

American Hornet Moth

Dear Dan,
This is one of the Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae, a group that includes many members that mimic stinging wasps and bees for protection.  Your individual is an American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, which we identified on BugGuide, and according to BugGuide:  “In flight they closely resemble wasps, even producing the droning sound.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp-like bug in the Rockies
Geographic location of the bug:  British Colombia, Canada – in the mountains
Date: 09/07/2018
Time: 01:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this wasp-like bug at Panorama, BC. Its tiny head and almost moth-like antenna made me stop and look again. I wish I knew what it was. It did not move while I studied it, but I also did not want to disturb it as I don’t know if that’s a real stinger or if its a copy-cat! I saw it the second week of August.
How you want your letter signed:  Nicole

American Hornet Moth

Dear Nicole,
Your observations are quite astute.  Though it resembles a wasp, the American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, which is pictured on BugGuide, is a member of the Clearwing Moth family Sesiidae, a group that contains many members that mimic stinging insects.  According to BugGuide:  “In flight they closely resemble wasps, even producing the droning sound. ”  The species is also known as the Poplar Clearwing Borer or the Cottonwood Crown Borer.

American Hornet Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp w/hornet like coloring and long curled antennae
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland OR
Date: 07/27/2018
Time: 06:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
Found this guy chilling on the shaded wall of a building, so still I thought he may have been asleep. 90+ F outside, so maybe he/she was just lethargic. We are in an industrial area of town near slow-moving swampy backwaters of the Columbia River, so it is a very entomologically active place. Spider wasp maybe? But so brightly colored!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Hayley

American Hornet Moth

Dear Hayley,
This is neither a wasp nor a hornet.  It is a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, a group with many species that are effective mimics of stinging insects.  We have identified your moth on BugGuide as the American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, and according to BugGuide, other common names include Poplar Clearwing Borer and Cottonwood Crown Borer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Never seen one of these
Geographic location of the bug:  Central New York
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 03:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this on my cone flowers.  Looks like a wasp with fuzzy  legs but the mouth parts looked more like a butterfly than a wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  Andy K

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Andy,
Most of the images submitted to our site of Squash Vine Borers are of females laying eggs on squash or pumpkin plants.  It is nice to get an image of one feeding.  Squash Vine Borers are Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae, and many members of the family mimic wasps for protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather legged flying insect. Id?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tom’s River NJ
Date: 07/08/2018
Time: 12:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Early summer. This one hangs out at my pumpkin plant around noon. It looks like it pokes the vines with its abdomen then rests on one of the leaves
Thank you in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Pumpkin watcher

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Pumpkin Watcher,
We have received numerous requests this summer to identify Squash Vine Borers, a species of moth that mimics a stinging wasp and lays its eggs on the the stems of plants in the squash family.  The larvae hatches and bores in the stems, often causing them to wither and die.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination