Currently viewing the category: "Clearwings"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp-like bug in the Rockies
Geographic location of the bug:  British Colombia, Canada – in the mountains
Date: 09/07/2018
Time: 01:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this wasp-like bug at Panorama, BC. Its tiny head and almost moth-like antenna made me stop and look again. I wish I knew what it was. It did not move while I studied it, but I also did not want to disturb it as I don’t know if that’s a real stinger or if its a copy-cat! I saw it the second week of August.
How you want your letter signed:  Nicole

American Hornet Moth

Dear Nicole,
Your observations are quite astute.  Though it resembles a wasp, the American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, which is pictured on BugGuide, is a member of the Clearwing Moth family Sesiidae, a group that contains many members that mimic stinging insects.  According to BugGuide:  “In flight they closely resemble wasps, even producing the droning sound. ”  The species is also known as the Poplar Clearwing Borer or the Cottonwood Crown Borer.

American Hornet Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp w/hornet like coloring and long curled antennae
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland OR
Date: 07/27/2018
Time: 06:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
Found this guy chilling on the shaded wall of a building, so still I thought he may have been asleep. 90+ F outside, so maybe he/she was just lethargic. We are in an industrial area of town near slow-moving swampy backwaters of the Columbia River, so it is a very entomologically active place. Spider wasp maybe? But so brightly colored!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Hayley

American Hornet Moth

Dear Hayley,
This is neither a wasp nor a hornet.  It is a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, a group with many species that are effective mimics of stinging insects.  We have identified your moth on BugGuide as the American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, and according to BugGuide, other common names include Poplar Clearwing Borer and Cottonwood Crown Borer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Never seen one of these
Geographic location of the bug:  Central New York
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 03:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this on my cone flowers.  Looks like a wasp with fuzzy  legs but the mouth parts looked more like a butterfly than a wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  Andy K

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Andy,
Most of the images submitted to our site of Squash Vine Borers are of females laying eggs on squash or pumpkin plants.  It is nice to get an image of one feeding.  Squash Vine Borers are Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae, and many members of the family mimic wasps for protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Feather legged flying insect. Id?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tom’s River NJ
Date: 07/08/2018
Time: 12:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Early summer. This one hangs out at my pumpkin plant around noon. It looks like it pokes the vines with its abdomen then rests on one of the leaves
Thank you in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Pumpkin watcher

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Pumpkin Watcher,
We have received numerous requests this summer to identify Squash Vine Borers, a species of moth that mimics a stinging wasp and lays its eggs on the the stems of plants in the squash family.  The larvae hatches and bores in the stems, often causing them to wither and die.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying
Geographic location of the bug:  Central New Jersey
Date: 07/06/2018
Time: 05:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  New to me. Hovering around my zucchini.
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy K in NJ

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Nancy,
The Squash Vine Borer is a moth that mimics a wasp for protection.  The female lays her eggs on the stems of zucchini, squash, melon or cucumber plants and the larvae bore in the stems, sometimes killing the plants.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The larvae complete their growth and development on wild and domesticated species of the genus
Cucurbita. This insect was once considered a nuisance to commercial growers and a problem to home growers of cucurbits. However, with the expansion of cucurbit production in the United States (U.S.) over the last decade, the squash vine borer has become a pest of economic importance (Brust 2010).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth or Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  NY- Finger Lakes Region
Date: 07/04/2018
Time: 07:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I grew up chasing insects and all manner of critters around UNY and have rarely been surprised. Is this a Wasp Moth? The geography doesn’t seem to fit. It has been around and in my garden for a week and I want to make sure it isn’t dangerous to my children.
How you want your letter signed:  Nate

Please disregard. I found it on my pumpkins and searched it out through a pests page and determined it was a Squash Vine Borer.
Nate Vitale

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Nate,
Your identification of the Squash Vine Borer is absolutely correct.

Thanks! Very much appreciated. Never had them in the garden growing up and never had I seen them in my town.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination