Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Handsome moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Terrebonne, Oregon
Date: 07/15/2019
Time: 12:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this fellow on my porch railing. I was wondering what kind it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Marietta

Big Poplar Sphinx

Dear Marietta,
Your image is lovely.  We believe this is a Big Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, based on images and information on the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states it “flies in riparian areas and suburbs from Alberta and North Dakota west to eastern Washington; south to Texas, Arizona, southern California, and Baja California Norte.”  Because of the lack of feathering on the antennae, your individual is a female, additionally evidenced by her plump, egg-filled abdomen.

That makes sense, because even though we are in the desert, we have hybrid poplars in our yard.
Thank you.
Marietta
You should keep an eye out for the larval Hornworm, pictured on BugGuide.

Thanks. I’ve seen these and others, it helps to know what they feed on. I plant tomatoes FOR the hornworms. My neighbors hate me! Ha! You can’t have big, beautiful moths without big, ugly caterpillars.
Our hybrid poplars are also very popular with the Mourning Cloak butterflies.
Thanks for your time.
Marietta
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Daughter caught a curiosity
Geographic location of the bug:  Lincoln City, Oregon
Date: 07/12/2019
Time: 10:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So another submission… my daughter Chloe caught this fella in her camping catch kit… we’re super excited to hear back from ya buggy folks as we dunno what this battle scared fella (or gal as Chloe says) is
How you want your letter signed:  Joe and kitty bit

Tiger Moth

Dear Joe and kitty bit,
This is a wasp-mimic Tiger Moth in the genus
Ctenucha, probably Ctenucha multifaria based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant moth in my car
Geographic location of the bug:  Houston, TX
Date: 07/12/2019
Time: 03:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was driving my kids to daycare this morning and in my rearview mirror I saw what I thought might be a leaf on my window. Then at a red light I turned around and realized it was in fact not a leaf, but a giant moth. I would just like to know what kind. Can you please help me identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Ashley F.

Polyphemus Moth laying eggs

Dear Ashley,
It appears as though this Polyphemus Moth has laid some eggs.

Should I feel bad for removing them? I mean it’s such a beautiful moth! But i really don’t want them living in my vehicle…

You can try placing the leaves on one of the following trees identified on BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of broad-leaved trees and shrubs, including birch, grape, hickory, maple, oak, willow, and members of the rose family.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pine Grove Mills, PA
Date: 07/09/2019
Time: 04:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman.  On the side of mom’s house today July 9. 2019
How you want your letter signed:  CC

Luna Moth

Dear CC,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Luna Moth.  We never tire of posting beautiful images of this gorgeous moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can anyone identify?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northumberland national park uk
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 05:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi would be great if you could Identify this, my partner is at work and is dying to find out!
How you want your letter signed:  Katherine

Large Elephant Hawkmoth

Dear Katherine,
This beauty is a Large Elephant Hawkmoth,
Deilephila elpenor, and according to UK Moths:  ” The English name of this moth is derived from the caterpillar’s fanciful resemblance to an elephant’s trunk.  The adults are attractively coloured pink and green affairs, with a streamlined appearance. They fly from May to July, visiting flowers such as honeysuckle (Lonicera) for nectar.  The larvae feed mainly on rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), but also other plants as well, including bedstraw (Galium).  It is a common species in most of Britain, including Scotland, where it has increased its range in recent years.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan
Date: 07/08/2019
Time: 10:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these insects mating on a dutchman’s pipe leaf.  They are black with an orange head – similar to love bugs found in the south; but wings look different and the antenae are longer.
How you want your letter signed:  Anita Kittel

Mating Grape Leaf Skeletonizers

Dear Anita,
Have you any grape vines nearby?  These are mating Grape Leaf Skeletonizer moths, and you can verify our identification on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Found on flowers in fields, etc. Adults are diurnal and nocturnal, and come to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination