Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Butterfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Silver City, NM
Date: 03/22/2020
Time: 08:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There were hundreds of these butterflies on this one type of bush. I tried to get close to them to get a good photo but they would all fly off. I caught one but didn’t want to kill it to get a good picture so I apologize for the poor photos. The spots on the wings are yellow. They are small, like skippers. I did look through the photos on your website but couldn’t find it.
How you want your letter signed:  Karen Nakakihara

Diurnal Moth: Litocala sexsignata

Dear Karen,
Butterflies are generally thought of as diurnal and moths as nocturnal, but this is actually a diurnal Moth that flies during the day.  We have identified it as
Litocala sexsignata thanks to Butterflies and Moths of North America where it states:  “Adults are diurnal. They may be seen nectaring at flowers or sipping moisture in muddy spots.”   According to BugGuide:  “common to abundant in some areas; uncommon in others.”  This species has no common name.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sunshine Coast, Queensland
Date: 02/29/2020
Time: 04:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
This moth stopped by and stuck with me for an hour. Ive never seen a moth like it, and was super interested to know what it was? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie

Macroglossum errans

Dear Melanie,
We apologize for the long delay.  We had identified your Hawkmoth as
Macroglossum errans on Butterfly House before the world as we know it changed due to COVID-19, but we did not complete a posting.  This pretty little moth does not have a common name.  There are also some images on the Butterflies of a Dorrigo Garden and Moths site where it states:  “”Flight habit:  Nocturnal – Active at night including early evening.”

Macroglossum errans

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Queensland Australian suburbs
Date: 02/21/2020
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw a large black or brown moth in my hall way which seemed to have two sets of eyes on its wings, two on the base of the wings and two in the tips. Only when I I had tried taking a photo of the moth I had my flash on and revealed some vibrant purple color on the wings.
How you want your letter signed:  Hope you can help, regards Lachie

Granny’s Cloak Moth

Dear Lachie,
We recall having previously identified this Owlet Moth in the past, and we found this posting in our archives of a Granny’s Cloak Moth
Speiredonia spectans.  According to Butterfly House:  “The moth of this species likes to hide in a dark place during the day and frequently is found in sheds and garages. The adult moth has brown wings with zig-zag patterns all over. The wing scales appear to have a finely grooved pattern that diffracts light to give the appearance of different colours depending on the angle of view. On each wing there is a pronounced eye spot, complete with eyelid!
Alternatively, if the spots on the forewings are imagined to be eyes, then those on the hind wings might be thought of as the nostrils of some large reptile. The moths even show a human-like face if viewed upside-down.
Either way, the appearance may deter possible predators. The moth has a wingspan of about 7 cms.
The adult moths are quite gregarious and seem to like resting in groups of at least a dozen or so. Pheromones probably are involved in this grouping behaviour, but also individuals that hatch on the same host plant (whatever it may be) at the same time would be subject to the same stimuli (light, plant odours etc) and therefore would move together in response. although moths of this size could travel many kilometres so this idea might not be deserving of too much credence.
However, once they find a place where they are secure they don’t seem to travel very far in the subsequent days, so maybe they do not generally fly very far at all. When they rest in groups: all the individuals tend to orient themselves in the same direction. If they are on a wall they are head-up near the ceiling (or eaves of the roof) and they hold their wings so that the patterns have maximum impact if approached from slightly below – the direction from which a bird would approach.
The moths also favour dark places such as caves, to rest during daylight hours, but suffer predation by bats in these places.”   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Maybe Cosmosoma but which species?
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica (Paraiso Quetzal Lodge)
Date: 02/13/2020
Time: 07:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this bug in Costa Rica near the Paraiso Quetzal Lodge in February. I think it’s a Cosmosoma but I didn’t find the species. Looks like this one: http://www.zonacharrua.com/butterflies/Andes-Cosmosomanrsubflamma.htm
But I’m not sure it’s possible to have a subflamma in Costa Rica.
How you want your letter signed:  JdA

Wasp Moth: Homoeocera gigantea

Dear JdA,
While you are correct that this is a Wasp Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, we do not believe you have the correct genus.  We believe based on images posted to Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute that this is
Homoeocera gigantea.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Whats this insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Date: 01/25/2020
Time: 05:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell us what this is? It looks like a fighter jet!
How you want your letter signed:  Shree

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Shree,
This beautiful, aerodynamic creature is an Oleander Hawkmoth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Wood Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  South East Queensland
Date: 01/19/2020
Time: 03:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a giant wood month? I measured my finger spread when I got home and it’s about 150mm! What’s the record length for a moth?
How you want your letter signed:  Mal

Giant Wood Moth

Dear Mal,
You are correct that this is a Giant Wood Moth,
Endoxyla cinereus, and if you examine your image, you will see the exuvia of the pupa in a hole in the tree trunk at the bottom edge of your image.  According to Butterfly House:  “The caterpillars pupate in their borehole. When the adult moth emerges, the empty pupal skin is left sticking out of the hole.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination