Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Horned Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Indonesia (?)
Date: 10/20/2017
Time: 06:06 AM EDT
Stumbled on this on facebook, wondering what this moth is.
How you want your letter signed:  Thomas

Creatonotos gangis: Tiger Moth displaying Coremata

Dear Thomas,
Early this year we received an image of a similar looking Tiger Moth, also from Indonesia, and Arctiid expert Julian Donahue informed us:  “the widespread Asian
Creatonotos transiens displaying his coremata (androconia are specialized scent scales usually confined to the wings).  You can see images here:  https://hiveminer.com/Tags/creatonotostransiens/Recent and also if you Google the congeneric Creatonotos gangis you will see images of similar coremata.”  Based on this Real Monstrosities image, we believe your species is the latter one.  That site states:  “Creatonotos is a genus containing about 10 species of moth found in parts of Africa, southeast Asia and Australia. Two species are particularly widespread and well known: C. transiens with their pale, orange abdomen and wings entirely white save for a few carefully-placed, black dots, and the more dramatic C. gangis. Their abdomens are red and they have lovely black stripes on their wings, as if someone was testing a brush before practising some Chinese calligraphy.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wood moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Casa Grande,AZ
Date: 10/04/2017
Time: 06:50 PM EDT
This moth has been on the tree all day,  what is it.
How you want your letter signed:  Lee h

Rustic Sphinx

Dear Lee,
This is not a Wood Moth.  It is a Rustic Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Freaky egg laying, giant fuzzy flea?! 🙂
Geographic location of the bug:  Union County, Ohio
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 04:29 PM EDT
This critter is doing its thing on my chicken coop door. It looks like a big, fuzzy flea or tick. It’s about 1/2-3/4 inch long. It’s laying a gob of eggs on a sort of cocoon. I poked the cocoon and it moved, and the critter moved too. WEIRD! What is it!?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Ohio

White-Marked Tussock Moth lays Eggs

Dear Curious in Ohio,
There are many flightless female moths, and we quickly identified your White-Marked Tussock Moth laying eggs thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Flightless females lay a froth-covered mass of up to 300 eggs after mating.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth Geometry
Geographic location of the bug:  Boquete, Panama
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 08:29 PM EDT
The markings on this moth look vaguely hieroglyphical.
How you want your letter signed:  Nora

Tussock Moth

Dear Nora,
We are certain this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We found these images from the genus
Halysidota on the Kirby Wolfe Costa Rica Tiger Moths page, and though they are not exact, they are quite similar.  It really resembles its North American relative the Banded Tussock Moth, Halysidota tessellaris. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange and Black Beetle-Like Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Boquete, Panama
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 07:35 PM EDT
A friend refuses to believe this is a moth, but I’m sure it is. What species?
How you want your letter signed:  Nora

Possibly Lichen Moth

Dear Nora,
Thanks for resending this image as a unique request.  The one beetle this really resembles is the moth-mimic Banded Net-Winged Beetle, but the legs, antennae and wing veins are quite different.   like you, we are inclined to believe this is a moth.  In our opinion, it resembles a Lichen Moth, but we could not locate any similar looking species on Kirby Wolf’s Costa Rica Tiger Moths page.  We also considered it might be a Leaf Skeletonizer Moth in the family Zygaenidae, but again, we could not locate any matching images.  We are going to contact Julian Donahue to get his opinion, and we would also enlist the assistance of our readership with this identification.

Update: While attempting to identify another Tiger Moth, we found Correbidia germana on FlickR and we are quite confident it is your orange and black moth.  According to Panama Insects:  “This moth, and several similar-looking species illustrated in this gallery, are nearly always present at lights in various abundance. They all, to one degree ot another, appear to mimic beetles in the family Lycidae that are present on Isla Colon.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified Moths of Panama
Geographic location of the bug:  Boquete, Panama
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 01:49 PM EDT
I find amazing, striking moths and other insects every morning on the outside walls of my house in Panama. I don’t have access to a field guide to help me identify these beauties.
How you want your letter signed:  Nora

Flannel Moth: Megalopyge albicollis we believe

Dear Nora,
This is a Flannel Moth in the family Megalopygidae, and we believe it is in the genus
Megalopyge.  This FlickR image of Melagopyge tharops looks very close, but we believe this FlickR image of Megalopyge albicollis is a much better match, however the same species on Moths of the Amazon and Andes looks different.  Flannel Moth Caterpillars should be handled with extreme caution as many species are capable of stinging.  Please, in the future, confine your submission to a single species unless there is another good reason to submit unrelated species in the same posting. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination