Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Recently emerged mith
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 05/20/2018
Time: 12:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What moth?
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy

Isabella Tiger Moth

Dear Kathy,
This is a newly emerged Isabella Tiger Moth, which you can verify thanks to this BugGuide image.  The Isabella Tiger Moth is the adult of the Banded Woolly Bear.

Isabella Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Bruny Island, Tasmania
Date: 05/18/2018
Time: 03:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This moth came to our patio lights when on vacation in Tasmania in 2008. Been trying ever since to find its ID.
How you want your letter signed:  Stephen Smith

Rain Moth

Dear Stephen,
Though it resembles a Hawkmoth, this is a member of a different family, Hepialidae, the Ghost Moths or Swift Moths.  We believe we have correctly identified it as
Abantiades atripalpis, a Rain Moth or Waikerie, thanks to images posted to Butterfly House where it states:  “The moths have grey-brown wings, often with two ragged silver flash markings across each forewing. The forewings often also show intricate sinuous patterns of pale lines. The wingspan of the males can reach 12 cms. That of the females can reach 16 cms.  The adult females deposit large numbers of eggs. Indeed, this species holds the World Fecundity Record, for the greatest number of eggs being deposited by a non-social insect. One dissected female had 44,100 eggs. It is thought that the eggs are laid in flight, just being scattered across the ground.” 

Many thanks, I’ve quite a few Australian moth photo’s as yet unidentified. If you don’t mind I’ll post more in the future as I work my way through them.
Regards Steve.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Echo moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Venice fl
Date: 05/16/2018
Time: 10:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought you’d like this.
How you want your letter signed:  Interested

Echo Moth

This is a beautiful image of an Echo Moth, Seirarctia echo

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  diurnal moth from Sulawesi, Indonesia
Geographic location of the bug:  Lore Lindu NP, north-central Sulawesi
Date: 05/13/2018
Time: 04:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear bugman –
Could you please help ID this day moth from central Sulawesi, feeding rather unglamorously on some roadkill? It was seen on the 19th of September 2017 on a road through pristine humid forest at an elevation of about 1500m. I think perhaps it could be form the genus Milionia, but I am not a moth expert (at all!). Many thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Isidoreajar

Geometer Moth from genus Milionia

Dear Isidoreajar,
Based on what we have found on the internet, we believe your genus identification
Milionia is correct, but we cannot find any individuals with these exact marking.  Perhaps it is sexual dimorphism and/or regional color variations.  This image from Etsy and this posting to Wikipedia are similar but not exactly correct. 

Dear Daniel –
Thank you for your prompt reply: I was prepared to be astounded if you had come back with a positive ID as I have had a pretty thorough search (with my limited expertise though!) through the obvious online avenues. Having said that, M. delicatula is very close, just lacking the small red forewing markings. I’ll keep trying!
Many thanks again: your efforts are really much appreciated.
All v best wishes,
Jonathan Meyer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge weird moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Western washington
Date: 05/10/2018
Time: 03:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a very interesting huge moth/butterfly? Do I catch it or kills or let it go?
How you want your letter signed:  Bobbi

Male Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Bobbi,
This is a male Ceanothus Silkmoth and they are currently flying in western states.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  It is harmless and you should let it be.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pittsburgh,PA
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 10:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Here’s the ‘little’ guy.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi

Luna Moth

Dear Naomi,
Thanks for your comment and also for submitting your image.  This is our first Luna Moth sighting this year.  Generally we received our first sighting report in late January or February and that sighting comes from the south, including Texas and Georgia, and as spring moves north, the sightings continue, including sightings from Maine in June.  We are curious why there is such a dearth of Luna Moth sightings this spring. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination