Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange Maybe-moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Philadelphia, PA USA
Date: 12/24/2018
Time: 05:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I forgot I’d taken this photo – it was taken on September 13th or 14th. This insect was on a door.
How you want your letter signed:  curious citizen in Philly

Plume Moth

Dear Curious Citizen in Philly,
This is indeed a Moth.  More specifically it is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Wood Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Black Rock, Melbourne
Date: 12/10/2018
Time: 04:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think these are Endoxyla cinereus, and I assume they are mating? Some students of mine found these in the school playground – absolutely fascinated. The CSIRO page still doesn’t show it as present in Victoria, so perhaps it is something else?
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew P

Mating Wood Moths

Dear Andrew,
We agree that these are mating Wood Moths in the family Cossidae, but we cannot confirm the exact species with any certainty.  We often have trouble differentiating members of this family, and we also confuse members of this family with the Ghost Moths or Swift Moths in the family Hepialidae, which are pictured on Butterfly House.  While we would not rule out that this might be
Endoxyla cinereus, which is pictured on Butterfly House, we can state that it really resembles the individual we posted earlier today that we believe is a Wattle Goat Moth, Endoxyla encalypti.

Mating Wood Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified large Australian Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Recliffe Peninsua, Queensland, Australia
Date: 12/09/2018
Time: 07:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I snapped this beauty outside a fish and chip shop on the weekend, taking a rest on a kerb, which would make it about 15cm from front legs to wing tips. I have no idea what sort it is, though, and haven’t seen one before. Can you help? It would be good to put a name to the face, as it were.
How you want your letter signed:  Joshua

Wattle Goat Moth, we believe

Dear Joshua,
This appears to be one of the Wood Moths or Goat Moths in the family Cossidae, possibly the Wattle Goat Moth,
Endoxyla encalypti, which is pictured on Butterfly House where it states:  “The adult moths have forewings that are speckled grey and brown with indistinct light and dark streaks. The hindwings are reddish-brown at the base, fading to grey-brown at the margins. The wingspan is around 10 cms.  The thorax of the adult moth has an uncanny likeness to the head of a mouse! The ‘eyes’ of the mouse are the thicker parts of the bluish lines running on either side of the thorax, located just behind the real eyes.”

Thanks Daniel. The wingspan of this individual was definitely greater than 10cm, but that does look a very close match. Appreciate the help!
Josh

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth/butterfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Punta Gorda FL 33950
Date: 11/26/2018
Time: 08:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was on our lanai. Body looks like a stick. The wings look like wood. The legs were white and completely blended into the wall paint color. Was about 1- 2 inches long. Very cool.
How you want your letter signed:  Just curious

Tersa Sphinx

Dear Just Curious,
This is a Tersa Sphinx, a moth in the family Sphingidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Speckled moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Israel
Date: 12/03/2018
Time: 01:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?
How you want your letter signed:  SMG

Speckled Footman Moth

Dear SMG,
We originally posted an image of Utetheisa pulchella, a Speckled Footman Moth, in 2006, but alas, the image does not currently show live.  It is pictured on this Israeli site and according to Lepidoptera and their Ecology:  “
Utetheisa pulchella inhabits mainly coastal dunes, rocky areas, dry slopes and other warm, gappy vegetated habitats.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect is this??
Geographic location of the bug:  India
Date: 11/07/2018
Time: 04:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It has a texture like wood and is a flying insect.. It is there at the same place since 5 hours and hadn’t move an inch..
How you want your letter signed:  Dhruv

Hawkmoth

Dear Dhruv,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Many Hawkmoths have brightly colored underwings that are hidden by brown or gray wings that act as good camouflage if the moth alights on a tree trunk.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination