Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee??
Geographic location of the bug:  Sw washington
Date: 07/10/2020
Time: 01:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What the heck is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Rochelle

Clearwing Moth

Dear Rochelle,
This is not a Bee, but your mistake is understandable.  This is actually a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, and many members of the family are very effective Wasp mimics.  We believe this might be an American Hornet Moth which is pictured on BugGuide, and the long ovipositor indicates this is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Chester,CT
Date: 07/05/2020
Time: 11:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this beautiful moth when I was out walking last week.  I am not sure the exact name of this bug, hoping you can help!
How you want your letter signed:  Heather S.

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Heather,
This beauty is a Pandorus Sphinx, and according to iNaturalist:  “Female adults lay translucent eggs singly on leaves of the host plant, mainly
Vitis (grapes), and Parthenocissus (Virginia creeper). Caterpillars are large, green or red with a swollen third thorax segment into which the head and first two thoractic segments can be drawn. The abdomen has a small white spot on the second segment, and big white oval spots the last five spiracles. They also have the characteristic “horn” at the end of the abdomen, until it is replaced by a button in its last instar. Larvae consume copious amounts of foliage, and when they are ready they climb down their host plant and burrow underground, where they pupate. The pupa is dark brown in color, quite slender, and has a long cremaster. There the pupa will remain for either a couple of weeks or a couple of months, depending on the generation. When the pupa is ready, it wiggles to the surface just prior to eclosion. The newly emerged adults then climb on a plant or some other surface, and pump fluid into their wings to extend them. Females emit pheromones at night, and males fly into the wind to pick up and track the pheromone plume. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Brown Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Hide-A_Way Hills, Hocking Cty, OH 43107
Date: 06/18/2020
Time: 08:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this by our front door, June 16, 2020.  Could not find the exact same one online.  What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Jan

Tulip Tree Silkmoth

Dear Jan,
This looks to us like a male Tulip Tree Silkmoth,
Callosamia angulifera, and it is pictured on BugGuide.  It is one of the Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae.  Giant Silkmoths only live a few days, long enough to mate.  They do not feed as adults.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fremont , Michigan
Date: 06/19/2020
Time: 04:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beauty on our siding. Wondering what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Small Magpie

Dear Pam,
Your pretty little Crambid Moth,
Anania hortulata, is commonly called a Small Magpie, Anania hortulata (formerly Eurrhypara hortulata), and we confirmed its identity on BugGuide. According to BugGuide it is an introduced Eurasian species and: “Larvae feed mainly on nettle (Urtica spp.), but mint (Mentha spp.) and bindweed (Convolvulus spp.) are also used.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Antheraea Oculea
Geographic location of the bug:  Edgewood, New Mexico
Date: 06/22/2020
Time: 01:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Oculea silk moth. Emerged under the English Oak in our back yard on June 21, 2020.
How you want your letter signed:  J. Bryan

Oculea Silkmoth

Dear J. Bryan,
Thanks so much for submitting your gorgeous image of an Oculea Silkmoth or Western Polyphemus Moth,
Antheraea oculea.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are also similar to A. polyphemus, but darker and with more markings around the eye spots. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identifying Black Moth(?) with Metallic Blue Markings
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Indiana, USA
Date: 06/18/2020
Time: 11:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I noticed what appears to be black moths flirting between tree leaves and circling the trees a few days ago. I’ve never seen these moths in my parents’ yard or anywhere else. They are several of them, 5-10, and they are flying around a weeping willow and an oak tree. They are landing and staying on the oak leaves even when approached. Thank you for you help in identifying this for me and my family!
How you want your letter signed:  Nicholas K. Sobecki

Virginia Ctenucha

Dear Nicholas,
Congratulations on identifying this Virginia Ctenucha as a moth.  It is a very effective wasp mimic.  Here is a BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Despite its name, this species is more commonly found in the northern United States and southern Canada than in Virginia, which represents the southern boundary of its range.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination