Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink Moth with Fuzzy Red Head
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found a moth with beautiful pink wings. It’s fuzzy head was a dark red with the color transitioning into the wings. Fuzzy thick arms and on its underside it was brown. It’s currently September in Central Florida. It was sitting on a window at a pharmacy.
How you want your letter signed:  🙂

Female Io Moth

Dear :),
This is a female Io Moth, but her most distinguishing physical feature is not apparent in your image.  Both female and male Io Moth have striking eyespot markings on the underwings that are hidden when the moth is at rest.  Once startled, the moth reveals the underwings, potentially frightening a predator into perceiving that it has wakened a sleeping giant that could turn around and eat the predator.  This illusion is protective mimicry.  We suspect this individual was attracted by the pharmacy lights and then decided to stay and rest during the day until the following night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Malformed moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Midway Utah – on the WOW trail
Date: 09/10/2019
Time: 12:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this little guy crawling around while biking. It looks like he didn’t develop properly. Can you tell what species it might be? And what would cause it to grow so poorly?
How you want your letter signed:  JAB

Newly emerged Buck Moth

Dear JAB,
This is a Buck Moth in the genus
Hemileuca that has just emerged from the pupa and its wings have not yet expanded.  There are at least eight species in Utah in the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge moths
Geographic location of the bug:  Brookfield Illinois USA
Date: 09/04/2019
Time: 04:12 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Encountered this beauty on a sidewalk today. Wings appear hollow … is it just illusion?
How you want your letter signed:  Chris

Achemon Sphinx

Dear Chris,
This is an Achemon Sphinx, and you may read more about it on Sphingidae of the Americas.  The markings on the wings and the camera angle have created the illusion that the forewings are rolled, but they are actually quite flat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Histioea in Ecuador
Geographic location of the bug:  Archidona, Ecuador
Date: 08/28/2019
Time: 01:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Have what appears to be a rare Histioea, but cannot identify it. These are seldom photographed from what I can tell. The observation is https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/19385404.
How you want your letter signed:  Trevor

Diurnal Tiger Moth: Histioea paulina

Hi Trevor,
We have several diurnal Tiger Moths in our archives identified as
Histioea meldolae, including this individual from Colombia and this individual from Costa Rica.  We will forward your image to Arctiid expert Julian Donahue to see what he can provide in the way of an identification.

Julian Donahue responds.
Hi Daniel,
This is a perfect match for the female of the euchromiine Histioea paulina Walker, 1866, as figured in Seitz, described from São Paulo, Brazil–a long way from Ecuador, but I don’t have any information on the distribution of the species.
Nice moth!
Julian

Thanks Daniel and Julian for the id! I will update inaturalist with the info. Much appreciated and very exciting!!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  rothschildia in Yasuni National Park Ecuador
Geographic location of the bug:  Orellana, Ecuador, Yasuni National Park.
Date: 08/27/2019
Time: 10:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  See https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28849696 for the inaturalist post. Beautiful Rothschildia but I cannot identify it!
How you want your letter signed:  Trevor

Giant Silkmoth: Rosthchildia species

Dear Trevor,
We also have trouble with
Rothschildia species, so we are contacting Bill Oehlke to see if he can identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Carrboro NC
Date: 08/22/2019
Time: 04:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi all, love your website, and you always seem to find the answer! I found this rather bedraggled moth on a tree trunk. It was fairly large….like a Sphinx moth, but the head looks wrong for a Sphinx…and underwing of some sort? I couldn’t match it with any Sphinx that I knew.
How you want your letter signed:  Mothra

Probably Clouded Underwing

Dear Mothra,
We didn’t have high hopes for providing you with a species name, though we had confidence that this is an Underwing in the genus
Catocala.  We believe this BugGuide image of a Clouded Underwing, Catocala nebulosa, looks like it might be correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination