Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  UNIDENTIFIED FLYING MOTH/INSECT?
Geographic location of the bug:  LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
Date: 07/21/2018
Time: 06:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you tell me what this is, and whether I should be worried about it?  It looks like a cross between a moth and a scorpion (turned up and pointed lower body).  It has been sitting on my window (outside) all day.
How you want your letter signed:  Sheila Wasserman

7:12 PM
I am thinking that this poor moth has deformed wings and that it cannot fly.  It has been in the same position all day on my window.  Is there anything I can feed it –I can try to get it into a flower bed and leave some water in a tiny cap.  But otherwise, I don’t know what to do with it.

Erythrina Borer

Dear Sheila,
Your moth is an Erythrina Borer,
 Terastia meticulosalis, and it is not deformed.  Moths are often attracted to porch lights and we suspect it will eventually fly away.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The marbled-brown forewings of Terastia meticulosalis make this species cryptic when at rest. However, its hind wings are white”  and “The young larvae of Terastia meticulosalis are found inside the stems of Erythrina herbacea, where their feeding produces a characteristic dying-off of the tip of the host plant.”  The host plant is commonly called a coral tree and according to Los Angeles Almanac it is the official tree of the City of Los Angeles.

Thank you so much for your response.  It makes perfect sense, as we have a gorgeous coral tree in our backyard – that’s the bad news for us.  But appreciate your speedy response.
Warm regards,
Sheila
The moths and caterpillars should not be plentiful enough to cause concern for a healthy tree.
Thank you.  I hope you’re right.  We’ll have to keep a watch on our tree.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Orpheus Island, North Queensland
Date: 07/21/2018
Time: 06:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
I encountered this moth hanging out on the wall at my work and I’m having a hard time figuring out what he is?!
How you want your letter signed:  KMcAuley

Hawkmoth: Daphnis placida

Dear KMcAuley,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, and they are very powerful fliers and they are also long lived, which does allow them to fly across large bodies of water. Thanks to images posted to Butterfly House, we are confident your individual is
Daphnis placida, a species with no common name.  According to Butterfly House:  “The adult moth has a complex pattern of light and dark brown on the wings, and a white bar across the first abdominal segment. The moth has a wingspan of about 6 cms.”  According to Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic, the global distribution is:   “Nicobar and Andaman Islands (Kailash Chandra & Rajan, 2004), Thailand, southern China (Hainan Island), Philippines, Indonesia (Sumatra, Java, Bali, Flores, Timor), northern Australia, Vanuatu, New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying, attracted to my petunias
Geographic location of the bug:  Danbury, CT
Date: 07/20/2018
Time: 12:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I say this one flying around the petunias , landing and looked to be  feeding.  It’s about 1” long.  It’s wings are swept back like a fighter plane an triangular.
How you want your letter signed:  Charlie

Hemaris species

Dear Charlie,
In a very general way, and perhaps that is enough of an identification for you, this is a diurnal Sphinx Moth, meaning it flies during the day and it is a member of the Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth family Sphingiidae.  We can also tell you that it is in the genus
Hemaris, and that there are three species known to range in your area.  Our best guess is that this is the Hummingbird Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe.

Thanks a lot!  Yes, it is enough of an identification.  I appreciate the quick reply.
Charlie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Shepherdstown, WV
Date: 07/20/2018
Time: 12:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found him in the rocks
How you want your letter signed:  Todd Fagan

Royal Walnut Moth

Dear Todd,
This gorgeous moth is a Royal Walnut Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Danbury Ct
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 10:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this large interesting moth?
How you want your letter signed:  David

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear David,
This is a male Polyphemus Moth.  The Polyphemus Moth is even more impressive in its defense posture of exposing the large eyespots on its underwings, which might startle a predator into thinking it has disturbed a much larger creature capable of eating the predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large moth/insect sighted
Geographic location of the bug:  United Kingdom, England, Birmingham
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 07:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, I spotted this insect in a block of flats on the wall. I have searched allover the Internet and i can not identify this type of moth/butterfly/insect species.
Flabbergasted.
How you want your letter signed:  S. JARVIS

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear S. JARVIS,
This is a Poplar Hawkmoth,
Laothoe populi, and according to UK Moths:  “Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear. If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden.  Distributed commonly throughout most of Britain, the adults are on the wing from May to July, when it is a frequent visitor to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination