Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hairy red and black fly(?)
Geographic location of the bug: Texas (San Antonio)
Date: 04/24/2021
Time: 02:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This gorgeous hairy-breeched insect was obsessed with my (non-flowering) cucumber plant. It looks like a fly but I can’t find it in any databases. I checked for wasps and bees, too! Seen April 24th (late spring)
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Jennifer,
This is not a Fly.  It is a Moth that benefits by mimicking a Wasp.  This is a Squash Vine Borer, and since cucumbers are in the squash family, we presume it is a female laying eggs.  You can get additional information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Eureka Springs, AR
Date: 04/11/2021
Time: 04:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Weirdly beautiful. Is it some kind of moth? Love the bug man!
How you want your letter signed:  Enti Em

Newly Eclosed Tiger Moth

Dear Enti Em,
This is a freshly eclosed Tiger Moth whose wings have not yet fully expanded after emerging from the pupa.  We believe it might be a Salt Marsh Moth female, but we would not eliminate a species in the same genus without a common name,
Estigmene albida, which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Streaked Sphinx Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sarasota FL
Date: 04/11/2021
Time: 11:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think this is a Streaked Sphinx Moth.
How you want your letter signed:  Steven T.

Streaked Sphinx

Dear Steven,
You are correct that this is a Streaked Sphinx, a species that appears to be more common in Florida in recent years.  According to Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Flight: July in Florida” which makes your individual a bit early.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth? Butterfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Queensland Australia
Date: 04/10/2021
Time: 10:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey Bugman, spotted this Little critter tonight. Is it a moth? If so, what kind? I’v had a search online but can’t find anything similar.
How you want your letter signed:  LJ

Geometrid Moth

Dear LJ,
This is a moth not a butterfly, and it is in the family Geometridae.  There are many similar looking species and we did a quick search on Butterfly House and could not quickly provide you with a species.  We hope a family identification is sufficient for your needs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject”  Giant moth to be identified
Geographic location of the bug:  Kangaroo Ground, Victoria
Date: 02/08/2021
Time: 05:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This was on a tree in our yard yesterday 8 Feb 2021. It has been an unusually mild summer, with lower temperatures than usual. And last year we had more rain than usual. We wonder if this is a Giant Wood Moth, even though we are in Victoria. Photos include a closeup of the wings, a photo side-on showing environmental context and relative size to my husband who is 6’4″ tall (in which you should be able to see the striped body of the moth), and a photo of the remains of a cocoon on the same tree from which we believe it emerged. Hopefully this helps.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Giant Wood Moth

We agree that this is a Giant Wood Moth, Endoxyla cinereus, and according to Butterfly House:  “The caterpillars pupate in their borehole. When the adult moth emerges, the empty pupal skin is left sticking out of the hole” as your one image illustrates.  According to Australian Museum:  “The Giant Wood Moth is the heaviest moth in the world, with some females weighing up to 30 grams.”

Exuvia of a Giant Wood Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Cape South Africa
Date: 03/15/2021
Time: 05:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I tried to identify this month, it’s either a polkadot wasp moth or a nine dot moth. Can you help? The orange markings seem different from both species.
How you want your letter signed:  Kind regards

Cool Maiden

This is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and it reminds us very much of an image identified as the Heady Maiden Moth, Amata cerbera, which we identified a few years ago, so we searched for other members of the genus in South Africa.  We found the Cool Hornet Moth, Amata kuhlweini, on iNaturalist and we verified its identity on African Moths where the common name is Cool Maiden.

Wow, Thank you for all the effort you put into identifying this stunning moth which now has a name~Cool Maiden!
I really appreciate it!
Kind regards
Liesl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination