Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please Identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Oregon, Outside Eugene
Date: 03/11/2019
Time: 11:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beauty while visiting a local lake in 2017.  It didn’t attempt to fly away the entire time we were there, and seemed unfazed when I stuck a phone camera several inches from its face.   I was afraid it was dead, but it was still moving a bit.  Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Dan

American Hornet Moth

Dear Dan,
This is one of the Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae, a group that includes many members that mimic stinging wasps and bees for protection.  Your individual is an American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, which we identified on BugGuide, and according to BugGuide:  “In flight they closely resemble wasps, even producing the droning sound.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth id
Geographic location of the bug:  Hoedspruit Limpopo province south africa
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 04:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help wuth the identification of this huge moth. Emperor family perhaps. Currently summer in south africa
How you want your letter signed:  Andriette

Giant Silkmoth

Dear Andriette,
You are correct that this is an Emperor Moth or Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae, and we believe it might be Pseudobunaea irius based on images posted to Lepidoptera Barcode of Life.

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
I agree with irius.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Miri, Sarawak, Malaysia
Date: 02/20/2019
Time: 03:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My niece found this interesting specimen in her garden today. Can you help,to identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Best regards, Nancy Viscofsky

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Nancy,
This beautiful moth is an Oleander Hawkmoth.  The caterpillars feed on the leaves of oleander, a plant commonly grown in gardens and used in landscaping.

Thank you Daniel, I will pass this information to my niece. It is very kind of you to respond to my query.
Best regards,
Nancy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large moth on the coast of Ecuador (2/20/2019)
Geographic location of the bug:  Manabi Province, Ecuador (Santa Marianita)
Date: 02/20/2019
Time: 02:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman, thanks for all the resources you’ve provided on your website! I live at sea level, (actually a 2 minute walk to the beach) and after the rains I’ve been trying to figure out what sort of giant moths are taking over. On my own I just can’t seem to pin it down (I checked a taxonomy website and the only other google search like them is an captioned stock photo.
They’re all around the same size, maybe varying by an half an inch or so and come in various shades of brown to silvery gray, with what look like shaggy fur on the backs, shared features being the sort of half-moon markings and band across the bottom from what I an tell.
Here’s some photos (one with a standard usd quarter next to it) and I’ll try and answer anything if you need more info!
How you want your letter signed:  Ada

Giant Silkmoth

Dear Ada,
This is a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  Members of this family do not feed as adults, so they only live about a week, long enough to mate and reproduce.  We believe your individual might be in the genus
Arsenura, which is well represented on Bold Systems.  There are several species from the genus found in Ecuador.  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a species identification.

Giant Silkmoth

Bill Oehlke Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is a Caio species, either harrietae or championi.
It is quite dark in either case, but that might just be the lighting. I favour harrietae.
Please see if I have permission to post to website as harrietae? And check to see if photographer wants to be credited?
Thanks for thinking of me.
Bill Oehlke

Hi, thank you so much for getting back to me!
The pictures were all taken in late morning (11am) in indirect (overcast), I agree, they look unusually dark but the pictures are as accurate as they appear in real life as far as color goes, I would agree that the one was unusually dark in color.

Of course you can use the pictures, I after looking around I would agree just on at a glance that it belongs as harrietae.
They’re amazingly beautiful (and as big as a bat!), usually I only see the wings on the sidewalk, to see alive specimens during the day was very awesome.
Ada
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Irene, Pretoria, South Africa
Date: 02/08/2019
Time: 12:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this unusually large moth in the house late in summer and managed to get a good photo.
How you want your letter signed:  Megan

Giant Silkmoth is Speckled Emperor: Gynanisa maja

Dear Megan,
This gorgeous Moth is a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae and thanks to African Moths, we have identified it as
Gynanisa maja, the Speckled Emperor.  The species is also pictured on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what moth is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  nea makri, attiki, greece
Date: 02/10/2019
Time: 08:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hello i found this moth outside my house it looks like tersa sphinx but not quite do you happen to know what is it? also  (though i have no photos amd i understand if you cant answer that) around 2010 some black spiders had appeared(havent seen any ever since), they were hairy(a little bit, nothing like tarantulas), about 10 cm, with fat legs(but still not as fat as tarantulas) do you happen to understand what kind they were?  thank you very much 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Maria

Levant Hawkmoth

Dear Maria,
Though it resembles the North American Tersa Sphinx, we believe your individual is a Levant Hawkmoth,
Theretra alecto, based on images posted to Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.  According to Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic:  “Occurs in areas where grapes are grown. Little is known about the behaviour of this species except that it is attracted to flowers and light.”  Your black hairy spiders might have been endangered Ladybird Spiders.

Levant Hawkmoth

thank you very very much for your answer. yes i saw about levant and i think its the one. im sorry i dont have photos of the spider. back in 2010 we didnt have such good phones to take accurate photos in the dark :/ unfortunately the one i saw was much bigger like a palm of a hand. maybe some spiders someone left loose? maybe thats the reason noone have seen one again ever since.. but no matter what thank you so much for your response have a good day 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination