Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Turquoise/gray beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Claremore, OK
Date: 09/13/2018
Time: 04:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Mr. Bugman,
Can you help me identify this particular bug?  I have moved my family out into the country, near where I grew up.  I have uncovered and discovered just about every bug known to man as a kid, but have never seen one of these.  It was crawling around in some leaves/twigs and bark, on the ground,  under a pecan tree.  It moved fairly quickly, but stopped when I went near it.  The picture was taken on 9/10/18, in the early evening.  We are still in the hot summer days here, but this was a relatively cool day, so to speak, with highs in the mid 80’s.  My 6 year old daughter will love to hear from you, since I obviously couldn’t answer her.  Haha!
How you want your letter signed:  Mr. Bugman

Flightless Female Moth

This is a flightless female moth, but we need a bit more time to provide you with a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Budworm Moth caught laying eggs on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/12/2018
Time: 07:32 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Yesterday I noticed the bane of all home Cannabis gardeners, about eight tiny Budworms, Chloridea virescens, crawling on the righteous colas of My Woody Plant as well as on Abel’s Indica #1.  They were tiny Budworms, probably just hatched, and they didn’t have time to bore into the buds where they begin eating, leaving a shit-filled shell of a bud as they grow.  This morning I found a few more tiny Budworms on the same two plants, and horror of horrors, two buds with signs of a feeding Budworm, the brown and dead florets, and sure enough, larger Budworms were feeding on some swelling buds.  I wrote to Mel Frank and he wrote back that it wasn’t too late to spray Bt, so I started spraying about 6:30 this evening.  It was a beautiful night sky with a sickle Moon, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars all visible just past sunset.  When I began spraying the Purple Fire clone, I saw a moth fly out of the interior of the plant and I missed it with my hand, and I watched it fly toward the plants I had just sprayed.  I had a second chance to catch it and missed, so I got a fish net and caught it on the third try.  I kind of mangled it in the process, but I am certain what I was watching was the Budworm Moth flying from cola to cola laying eggs, which probably explains why I would only find one Budworm per bud.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Tobacco Budworm Moth

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thank you ever so much for providing us with your harrowing gardening experience.  It sounds quite stressful.  BugGuide has no information on the Tobacco Budworm feeding on
Cannabis, but it does state the larval foods are “Cotton, tobacco, roses, ground cherries, soybean, and many others” and “Caterpillars feed on buds, flowers, fruits, and seeds, making them an agricultural crop pest.”  We did locate a Springer Link essay “Flight activity of Heliothis virescens (F.) females (Lepidoptera:  Noctuidae) with reference to host-plant volatiles” that states:  “Many phytophagous insects use airborne volatiles emitted from plants to locate their hosts.  The recent development of bioassay systems for studying host-plant finding and ovipositional behavior under controlled environmental conditions in the laboratory has intensified interest in characterization of the specific behaviors regulated by volatile emissions from plants and identification of the active compounds.”  Again, alas, Cannabis in not mentioned.  Do the plants in question produce odiferous airborne emissions?

Tobacco Budworm Moth

Dear Bugman,
Thanks for all that information.  The buds on my plants do smell quite dank.  I keep finding Budworm Eggs, but luckily, not much bud damage.  Here is an image of one of the dreaded Budworm Eggs.  Harvest is near.
Constant Gardener

Budworm Egg

Mel Frank Comments:
Tobacco budworm moth is brown with 3 Chevron markings on wings.i believe they are attracted by terpene fragrances which become prominent during flowering, increasing as they mature. Rarely see them in beginning flowering. Once flowers begin smelling you must spray more often than every two weeks.12 days early and once a week flowering.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp-like bug in the Rockies
Geographic location of the bug:  British Colombia, Canada – in the mountains
Date: 09/07/2018
Time: 01:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this wasp-like bug at Panorama, BC. Its tiny head and almost moth-like antenna made me stop and look again. I wish I knew what it was. It did not move while I studied it, but I also did not want to disturb it as I don’t know if that’s a real stinger or if its a copy-cat! I saw it the second week of August.
How you want your letter signed:  Nicole

American Hornet Moth

Dear Nicole,
Your observations are quite astute.  Though it resembles a wasp, the American Hornet Moth,
Sesia tibiale, which is pictured on BugGuide, is a member of the Clearwing Moth family Sesiidae, a group that contains many members that mimic stinging insects.  According to BugGuide:  “In flight they closely resemble wasps, even producing the droning sound. ”  The species is also known as the Poplar Clearwing Borer or the Cottonwood Crown Borer.

American Hornet Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Durbanville Hills, South Africa
Date: 09/08/2018
Time: 06:53 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good day. I came across this beautiful moth at a wedding venue yesterday. About 3cm in length (rough estimate). Any idea how to identify it?
How you want your letter signed:  Francois

Hi
I managed to ID it myself after submitting. It is “Diaphone eumela”, the Cherry Spot.
Thanks!
F

Cherry Spot

Dear Francois,
Thank you for submitting your image of the lovely Cherry Spot, for identifying it and for writing back to us with your identification.  The species is well represented on African Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Interesting moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Springfield, Virginia
Date: 08/30/2018
Time: 11:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this moth on my front porch today,  August 30. I think it look like its camouflage is to appear as fungus on a tree trunk. Can you help me with the name of the species? I looked in my North American Wildlife guide, but couldn’t find a match.
How you want your letter signed:  Elena-age 11

Geometer Moth, possibly Euchlaena muzaria

Dear Elena,
While we don’t have time this morning to research the species of your interesting moth, we can tell you it is a member of the Geometer Moth family Geometridae.  We will attempt a species identification later in the day.

Update:  Based on this BugGuide image, we believe this moth is Euchlaena muzaria.  It is also pictured on Discover Life and Moth Photographers Group.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Colorado Mountains
Date: 08/30/2018
Time: 12:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have these in my house and need to know what they are. They are pretty small.
How you want your letter signed:  Toni

Many Plumed Moth

Dear Toni,
This is a Many Plumed Moth in the family Alucitidae and according to BugGuide:  “wings consist of unusual and diagnostic feather-like plumes (rigid spines from which radiate flexible bristles), normally spread apart like a fan when the moth is at rest; there are six plumes per wing, for a total of twenty-four.”  You have no cause for concern because moths that are considered Household Pests do damage during the larval stages and according to BugGuide:  “larvae are borers in fruits, flowers, buds, or stems of host plant larvae feed on honeysuckle (
Lonicera spp.) and snowberry (Symphoricarpos spp.), both of which are in the family Caprifoliaceae.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination