Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fremont , Michigan
Date: 06/19/2020
Time: 04:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this beauty on our siding. Wondering what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Pam

Small Magpie

Dear Pam,
Your pretty little Crambid Moth,
Anania hortulata, is commonly called a Small Magpie, Anania hortulata (formerly Eurrhypara hortulata), and we confirmed its identity on BugGuide. According to BugGuide it is an introduced Eurasian species and: “Larvae feed mainly on nettle (Urtica spp.), but mint (Mentha spp.) and bindweed (Convolvulus spp.) are also used.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Antheraea Oculea
Geographic location of the bug:  Edgewood, New Mexico
Date: 06/22/2020
Time: 01:14 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Oculea silk moth. Emerged under the English Oak in our back yard on June 21, 2020.
How you want your letter signed:  J. Bryan

Oculea Silkmoth

Dear J. Bryan,
Thanks so much for submitting your gorgeous image of an Oculea Silkmoth or Western Polyphemus Moth,
Antheraea oculea.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are also similar to A. polyphemus, but darker and with more markings around the eye spots. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identifying Black Moth(?) with Metallic Blue Markings
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Indiana, USA
Date: 06/18/2020
Time: 11:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I noticed what appears to be black moths flirting between tree leaves and circling the trees a few days ago. I’ve never seen these moths in my parents’ yard or anywhere else. They are several of them, 5-10, and they are flying around a weeping willow and an oak tree. They are landing and staying on the oak leaves even when approached. Thank you for you help in identifying this for me and my family!
How you want your letter signed:  Nicholas K. Sobecki

Virginia Ctenucha

Dear Nicholas,
Congratulations on identifying this Virginia Ctenucha as a moth.  It is a very effective wasp mimic.  Here is a BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Despite its name, this species is more commonly found in the northern United States and southern Canada than in Virginia, which represents the southern boundary of its range.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Lunate Zale
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 06/22/2020
Time: 8:35 AM EDT
While working in the yard, Daniel couldn’t help but to notice this new species to the porch light, a Lunate Zale, Zale lunata, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults – quite variable with both fore- and hindwings dark brown with shades of yellow, red brown and black, sometimes with white or silver marginal patches.”  The pronounced “shoulder pads” are not evident in most images, but The Natural History of Orange County includes images that reveal these unusual features.

Lunate Zale

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wtb
Geographic location of the bug:  South UK
Date: 06/07/2020
Time: 11:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can’t find this on the web. Can you identify it? It is on a south facing Passion flower.
Thanks,
GT
How you want your letter signed:  GT

Large Red-Belted Clearwing

Dear GT,
Though this looks like a Wasp, it is actually a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, and many members of the family benefit from mimicking stinging insects like Wasps.  We quickly identified your Large Red-Belted Clearwing,
Synanthedon culiciformis, on UK Moths where it states:  “The moth flies earlier in the year than many other clearwings, being on the wing in May and June.  The species inhabits heathland and woodland, where the host tree, birch (Betula abounds, and is known from much of mainland Britain.”  The site also states:  “Although generally larger than the similar Red-belted Clearwing, the sizes overlap and it is more easily distinguished by the orange-red suffusion at the base of the forewings” and that color is not evident in your images, so we would not rule out that your moth is a Red Belted Clearwing, Synanthedon myopaeformis.  According to UK Moths:  “The moths fly during the day but are not often seen, except by the use of pheromone lures. They occur from June to early August.”  Though the “orange-red suffusion” is not evident, we still believe your individual appears more like the former species.

Large Red Belted Clearwing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Flintstone, MD
Date: 06/02/2020
Time: 12:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t need this identified but thought I would share! Found this gem last night attached to my screen door. I was amazed by it’s beauty. After looking online I figured out it is a Luna Moth. Woke up this morning and he was on the wooden door frame of my screen door so I got some better pics of it. The pics I took last night didn’t turn out very good so I was excited when I saw he was still here!
How you want your letter signed:  Megan

Luna Moth

Thanks Megan,
We love posting images of Luna Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination