Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cruise ship moth
Geographic location of the bug:  At sea near Cozumel, Mexico
Date: 01/13/2018
Time: 10:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was on a week long cruise that left Cape Canaveral, Florida traveling to Haiti, Jamaica, and Cozumel. It was our last day at sea and we were heading back towards Florida. We found this moth clinging to the top deck of the ship because it was a very windy day. We coaxed it into a cup and transported it to a lower level open atrium that had many live plants. We figured it could fly away when we got to port or stay and go on another vacation. What type of moth is this?  Was it originally from Florida taking a holiday or a new passenger from one of our destinations?
How you want your letter signed:  Brian Norton

Fig Sphinx

Dear Brian,
This is a Fig Sphinx, and it might have stowed away in Florida, or come aboard in Mexico or the Caribbean, or even because Sphinx Moths are such strong fliers, been picked up at sea.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas, the Fig Sphinx is found in South America to Argentina as well as ” through Central America: Panama to Mexico: Quintana Roo (BT) probalby [sic] throughout Mexico, and the West Indies to Florida, southern Texas, and southern Arizona.  It occasionally strays as far north as Indiana and Pennsylvania.”

 

Fig Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moths in a Buckle
Geographic location of the bug:  South of my navel
Date: 01/14/2018
Time: 12:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this used belt buckle while thrift store shopping in Ventura, California. I’m wondering which type of moth is depicted in this beauty? What messages are moths sending as symbolic totems? They are beautiful and mystical to me.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Moth on Belt Buckle

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
Alas, often artist renderings of insects used as fashion articles, tattoos, and other art works are not anatomically correct.  This seems especially true of enamel belt buckles which an internet search proves.  In the case of the individual depicted on your lovely buckle, the outside edge of the upper wing is oriented at a very unusual obtuse angle that we cannot ever recall seeing existing in nature.  According to Native American Moth Mythology:  “Many California Indians consider moths a symbol of transformation, healing and prayer, and moth cocoons are used as sacred rattles in some California tribes. In other tribes, moths are associated with death and ghosts and may bring messages from the spirit world. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wondering if there is a name for this gentle giant
Geographic location of the bug:  Condell Park, New South Wales, Australia
Date: 01/15/2018
Time: 05:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was working the night shift and came across this gentle giant and was just wondering if it had a specific name?
Besides Moth😏
How you want your letter signed:  Kindest Regards Ray

Probably Ghost Moth

Dear Ray,
We believe this is a Wood Moth or Goat Moth from the family Cossidae, a group well represented on Butterfly House, but we would not discount that it might be a Ghost Moth or Swift Moth from the family Hepialidae, also well represented on Butterfly House.  We not only have trouble distinguishing the families apart, we also have problems with actual species identifications.  The larvae of Wood Moths are frequently called Witchetty Grubs. 

Hello,
Just wanted to take the time to say thank you for your reply!
It is greatly appreciated
Kindest Regards
Ray Davis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible Tiger Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  South-East Queensland
Date: 01/14/2018
Time: 11:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, my girlfriend found this moth attracted to a light in south east queensland, about 1 hour both west of the coast and South of Brisbane. It’s possible tiger moth though we do not know that species.
How you want your letter signed:  Jayden Waters

Donovan’s Tiger Moth

Dear Jayden,
You are correct that this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  Thanks to the excellent images and archives on Butterfly House, we were able to identify your moth as Donovan’s Tiger Moth,
Aloa marginata.  Donovan’s Tiger Moth is also pictured on iNaturalist and the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “The moth is white in colour, with two black lines on each forewing. There is the black and orange line along the edge of each forewing as well. Its abdomen is orange-red in colour with black spots on each segment.”  

Donovan’s Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A beautiful bug
Geographic location of the bug:  In an open grass field/tropical country
Date: 01/11/2018
Time: 09:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi. I just want to know what kind of insect in the attached photo is. I accidentally touched it and flew to our table. The back of our house is an open field with grass, trees.
I hope for your response. Thank you in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  eybi

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear eybi,
While it is possible to be even more vague about the “Geographic location of the bug,” we rarely encounter that situation.  We agree your Oleander Hawkmoth is beautiful.  Because it has been introduced to Hawaii, the Oleander Hawkmoth is included in Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  ” The Oleander Hawk Moth,
Deilephila nerii or Daphnis nerii, (Wing span: 90–110mm) is primarily associated with “the southern Mediterranean region, North Africa and the Middle East to Afghanistan (Ebert, 1969).”  Since the caterpillar feeds on the leaves of oleander, and since oleander is widely cultivated in gardens where the climate is appropriate, the range of the Oleander Hawkmoth has increased.  We get numerous submissions from India as well.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  A beautiful flying bug with mixed texture of colours on whole feathers and body
Geographic location of the bug:  India
Date: 01/06/2018
Time: 03:51 AM EDT
Please can anyone identify the bug…is it dangerous or not
How you want your letter signed:  Not really required

Oleander Hawkmoth

This gorgeous moth is an Oleander Hawkmoth, a species native to Asia that has been introduced to many other locations where oleander, the food plant for the caterpillar, is cultivated in gardens, including Hawaii.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination