Currently viewing the category: "Mites"

Subject: Can you identify this beetle?
Location: East Windsor, CT
September 18, 2016 1:17 pm
Hello,
A beetle flew in my drivers side window & struck me in the forehead. After safety pulling over I found between my seat a interesting bug I’d not seen before. It looks like a cross between a bumble bee & beetle. Orange and black back curtly Anita, about the size of a Quarter. I snapped some pictures, could you help me identify it?
Signature: Michael Liebler

Tomentose Burying Beetle and Mite

Tomentose Burying Beetle and Phoretic Mite

Dear Michael,
This is a Tomentose Burying Beetle,
Nicrophorus tomentosus, a species that can be distinguished from other Sexton Beetles in the same genus, according to BugGuide, by “dense yellow hair on pronotum distinctive,” a trait that adds to its resemblance to a Bumble Bee.  Burying Beetles or Sexton Beetles get their common name because they locate bodies of dead animals like mice, birds and even snakes which they bury after laying eggs on them.  According to BugGuide:  “Remarkable parental care: adults bury a small carcass, lay eggs in it, and stay to feed the young on regurgitated carrion.”  If you look closely at the image with the linoleum-like background, you can see a Phoretic Mite crawling on the pronotum.  Phoretic Mites have symbiotic relationships with Sexton Beetles, often covering them in great numbers for the sole purpose of hitching a ride to a prospective food source.  According to BugGuide:  “Phoretic mites are invariably present on Nicrophorus adults and may be involved in a symbiotic relationship with the beetles. These mites feed on any fly eggs that may be in the surrounding soil or on the carcass and which would otherwise hatch into maggots, competing (with Nicrophorus larvae) for the carrion (Springett 1968). In turn, the mites receive transportation to and from food sources that would otherwise be inaccessible to them, because carcasses are randomly distributed in place and time, and are a highly unpredictable resource. Four families of mites occur on the beetles: Parasitidae, Anoetidae, Uropodidae, and Macrochelidae. Poecilochirus mites (Parasitidae) form the largest and most active group of mites on the adult beetles….”

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Subject: fuzz ball with eyes
Location: new mexico
August 23, 2016 4:30 am
Hello, I have been plagued with the critters for several years and I would like to know what they are.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMR-AN_GneI&index=5&list=PLZyqnm4XHew6-SwAZlrTYda7Y3ZLp2tRq
Signature: janice bisset

Dust Bunny, we believe

Dust Bunny, we believe

Dear Janice,
There is not much detail in your image, which has a focus problem, so we cannot be certain, but we believe this is a Dust Bunny.  According to the Huffington Post:  “Deep cleaning your home can be emotional. There are feelings, and then there’s procrastination and somewhere, before you reach the finish line (or your wit’s end), there are questions. Like, what are those wads of dust that have made a home of their own underneath your sofa?”  The Huffington Post also provides this information:  “Dust bunnies are made of many things… …Including dead skin, hair, particles of fiber, paper and feathers, and lint from textiles.  Dust bunnies are held together with static electricity.  And in homes with many pets or lots of people with shedding hair, they can get large as they collect under furniture such as beds and sofas.  They can be harmful to those with allergy or respiratory issues.  According the Wilson, the danger lies in dust bunnies’ ability to harbor dust mites which can trigger an asthmatic or allergic reaction.  To ward off these potential allergy triggers, Wilson recommends moving your furniture once or twice a year as though you are moving out and cleaning underneath to ensure that the surfaces do not build up debris. As an extra measure of cleanliness, use a HEPA filtered vacuum so the dust does not blow back into the room, she says.”  The youtube link you provided is to a private video.

https://youtu.be/Slczo3Q-Gxk
thank you for your response—I made the video public and I will keep it that way for a few days. if you get a chance to watch it, notice the two antenna (?) and the way one of the ?appendages moves. see the two eyes?

Ed. Note:  The only movement we can perceive in the video is the entire “Fuzz Ball with Eyes” being moved by tweezers.  We do admit that some insects, including the Masked Hunter and certain Lacewing Larvae use debris as camouflage, but this does not appear to be either of those.

ok, thank you.

Hi daniel, here is another pic of the same type of “fuzz bug” after I put it alcohol. These things are very bad for my breathing so if I see them I try to make them stop mutiplying

Fuzz Ball in Alcohol

Fuzz Ball in Alcohol

Hi again Jessica,
Thank you for providing another image, but we still can’t make any specific identification.  There does appear to be something visible, but we are not sure what.  You might want to do some research on Dust Mites.

Subject: Red desert spider or insect?
Location: Golden Valley,AZ
July 3, 2016 11:05 pm
We found this in a wash in Golden Valley Arizona. Could you please tell us what it is? It looks like it has eight legs but I’m not positive
Signature: P P

Velvet Mite

Velvet Mite

Dear P P,
Did it rain right before this sighting?  Velvet Mites in the family Trombidiidae often appear in large numbers immediately after a desert rain.

Yes it sure did! Thank you!

Subject: Bug Love – American Carrion Beetle
Location: Southwest Indiana
May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Hello! I wanted to share some photos I took last summer of a pair of American Carrion Beetles with their mites. They were collected around some cat vomit…which might have had some mouse remains in it. (oh so pleasant!) Somehow the photo was forgotten until now – probably because I had embarrassment over taking bug love photos, ha ha!
Thank you for the awesome site. It’s my go-to place when I find a new bug, and I’ve never had to ask for identification – I always find what I’m looking for! We practice organic gardening on our little homestead, and I often find new creatures – so I visit your site often!
Thanks again!
Signature: Heather

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Dear Heather,
We are so thrilled to find out that you find our site so helpful.  We are also thrilled to post your images of a pair of mating American Carrion Beetles and their Phoretic Mites.

Subject: red insect
Location: Pretty Boy reservoir Maryland
March 26, 2016 4:08 am
Species/genus?
Signature: thx

Velvet Mite

Velvet Mite

This is a Velvet Mite and it might be in the genus Trombidium like this individual posted to BugGuide, but we cannot say for certain that it is not a member of a different genus in the family Trombidiidae as we do not have the necessary skills to identify Velvet Mites beyond the family level.

Thank you, Daniel for such a quick reply.
I was intrigued by the “heart-shaped” little bugger posted on facebook by a friend.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Insect.Identification/permalink/943095179139128/?pnref=story
I commented quoting your reply.
Thank you for the awesome work.
Chuck