Currently viewing the category: "Mites"

Subject: What’s on my orbweaver?
Location: Nova Scotia
August 4, 2017 3:47 pm
Hi Daniel,
I was working in and around a culvert and the longjawed orbweavers love to hang out on the ceiling, but this one has a few orange bulbs on him/her. Has this beauty been parasitized?
Signature: Curious

Long-Jawed Orbweaver with Mites

Dear Curious,
This Long-Jawed Orbweaver in the genus
Tetragnatha is carrying several Mites.  We found similar images on Buy Pet Armor and Mirrorless Macro, but we can’t locate any information on the type of Mite and the degree of harm it causes the Spider.  Spiders of North-West Europe has an image on their Spider Enemies page, so we are presuming the Mites are not beneficial.

Subject: Strange Red Wasp-like Bug
Location: Scotland
August 2, 2017 3:34 am
My mom found this bug flying and buzzing around our kitchen last night, it kept trying to run into our ceiling light, I thought it was some kind of wasp or hornet but I haven’t found anything resembling it on the internet. It’s the first time either of us have seen a creature like this so maybe it’s some sort of migrating species? Any info is greatly appreciated, thanks!! 🙂
Signature: Claire

Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Dear Claire,
This is a Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus Nicrophorus, probably the Common Sexton Beetle,
Nicrophorus vespilloides, which is pictured on NatureSpot UK, and it is covered with Phoretic or hitch-hiking Mites.  According to NatureSpot UK:  “These beetles perform an important service in getting rid of carrion (dead small animals and birds). Males and females cooperate to bury this matter, by digging beneath the bodies to provide a food supply for their larvae.”  A more poetic version is available on BugLife where it states:  ” Love at first corpse!  Males and females first meet at corpses of dead and decaying animals such as mice and small birds. When love has struck males and females pair up and fight off any rival couples trying to take charge of the corpse. Once a pair has won the corpse they dig a hole beneath it and bury it, this is where they get their name from.”

Subject: New to me
Location: Roanoke, VA
May 14, 2017 12:57 pm
Greetings. You have featured my shots 3 times I think. Cicada emerges, wheel bug, and a golden orb weaver. I love learning about all critters! I have not run into a new to me invertebrate in a few years. We recently moved and have some acreage. This guy showed up on the porch. He’s about the size of an eyed elater. He has pretty beefy jaws. What am I looking at here?
thank you!
Signature: neanderpaul

Northeastern Pine Sawyer with Phoretic Mites

Hi again Neanderpaul,
This is the first letter we have responded to that arrived since Daniel’s five-day hospitalization with pneumonia, resulting in WTB? going dark for a week.  Your images are amazing, and that headshot is a perfect illustration on why members of the Longhorned Borer Beetle subfamily Laminae are known as Flat-Faced Longhorns.  This is a Northeastern Pine Sawyer,
Monochamus notatus, which we verified with this BugGuide image.  If you look closely at that headshot, you will see some Phoretic Mites that are hitching a ride as they lack wings, and the Sawyer provides a means of locomotion.  This BugGuide series of images illustrates the same interspecies relationship.

Northeastern Pine Sawyer

Howdy,
Awesome! After some clues I thought I had a white spotted sawyer beetle. Northwestern pine sawyer it is. Thanks so much for the wealth of knowledge! I love all critters. Especially invertebrates!
Prayers offered for Daniel. Thanks for this great service you all provide.
NeanderPaul

Northeastern Pine Sawyer

Subject: Beetle with some tag-alongs in Bay Area California
Location: Palo Alto, California
January 12, 2017 5:54 pm
Hi,
I stumbled on this site while trying to identify a beetle that wandered into our apartment a few days ago on a cold, rainy evening. It’s black and shiny, and at first I thought it had some moss on its back, so I put it in a jar to look at it closer and show my 2-year-old son who loves bugs and beetles. The next morning I discovered all of the little brown dots were not moss, and were indeed animals which were crawling all over the beetle! I put a leaf in which seems to be satisfying both the beetle and the tag-alongs (aphids?).
Needless to say, I’m curious what beetle this is and why it’d be carrying around dozens of smaller bugs.
Signature: Beetle Dad

Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Dear Beetle Dad,
This is a Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus
Nicrophorus.  Most Burying Beetles are black with orange markings, so we believe your all black individual is the Black Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus nigrita based on images posted to BugGuide where the range is listed as”Pacific US states & so. BC.”  The small creatures are Phoretic Mites which use the more mobile Burying Beetle for transportation. 

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Bronx, New York
October 2, 2016 10:21 pm
Hi,
I just had a issue with my dog and fleas.. I took him to the vet and had all the appropriate procedures done. I also sprayed petlock indoors spray around his bedding area and all corners of the bedroom under the bed and in cracks and crevasses. While inspecting the area I saw these two types on insects near the crevasses on my wood floor. I’m hoping you can help me identify the species, are they harmful and what can I do to eradicate them.
I’ve included some macro shots and zoomed in at 300%. Hope that helps.
Thanks
Signature: Rick G.

Mite

Mite

Dear Rick
One of your tiny creatures appears to be a Mite.  Though many Mites are considered harmless, and some predatory species are considered beneficial, there are also many species that can cause problems to people and pets.  Bird Mites proliferate in the nests of birds like pigeons that may be in your eaves, and once the fledglings fly off, hungry Mites might enter the home in search of blood or other food.  Other Mites infest stored foods.  Scabies are a type of Mite.  We have also received reports of Mites on computers.  Alas, we are unable to provide you with a species identification on the Mite.  You second creature appears to be a benign Springtail, though when they are plentiful, Springtails can be a nuisance in the home.

Springtail

Springtail

Subject: What’s this beetle?
Location: Rocky Moutains (8,000 ft)
September 22, 2016 11:41 am
Moved a board this spring that was near a creek in Estes Park, CO and found this beetle underneath it. The soil was moist and it kept trying to crawl under debris around it. The picture is pretty good I think and I am curious as to what it is and if I should avoid them.
Thanks!
Signature: Ian Taylor

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Tomentose Burying Beetle

Dear Ian,
We have determined that because of the “dense yellow hair on pronotum” which BugGuide refers to as  “distinctive,” your Sexton Beetle is a Tomentose Burying Beetle,
Nicrophorus tomentosus.  Though most Sexton Beetles work in pairs to bury small, dead animals like mice or birds after laying eggs upon the carcass, according to BugGuide:  “unlike other nearctic Nicrophorus, adults do not bury the carcass but make a shallow pit and cover the carcass with litter.”  If you look closely at the head of your beetle, you will see that it is carrying a Phoretic Mite.