Currently viewing the category: "Mayflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Iowa
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 11:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please help identify this bug?  it was trying to burrow into the siding on my house.  Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Small Squaregilled Mayfly

This proved to be quite a challenge for us, but we eventually found this BugGuide image (which is eerily similar to your image) and this BugGuide image of a Small Squaregilled Mayfly in the genus Caenis.  There is a nice image on Yobi Adventures.  Mayflies have aquatic larvae and adults are generally found near bodies of water.  We believe you were mistaken in your interpretation that it was trying to burrow into the siding of your house.  Mayflies are popular bait for fly fishermen and many tied lures used by anglers are patterned after Mayflies.   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mosquito / may fly / dragon fly with tail
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Island, NY
Date: 05/29/2018
Time: 01:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These long tailed flies are swarming our house.  They don’t move much. They just sit on the screens and doors -Many until they die. We’re presuming they hatched from dirty rain gutters from a house we just bought. Some seem to be coming from vents outside that lead to the attic.  Please don’t let them be in the attic… They have long curved bodies and long tails.  We have a newborn and are nervous about them getting in because there are thousands of them. It’s like a scary movie bug swarm. Hoping they hate human blood.  Are they a beneficial fly that will prey on a nuisance species or are they out to get us? Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned new parents.

Mayfly

Dear Concerned new parents,
Other than being a nuisance when they are numerous, Mayflies like the one in the image you submitted are perfectly harmless and they will not harm you or your home.  The larvae of Mayflies are aquatic, so we suspect you are near some body of water.

I’m about half a mile from a river. But there was a lot of standing water all over this property before we took ownership of it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown flying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Anthem, AZ
Date: 03/13/2018
Time: 11:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found a number of these while fishing a small urban pond. They seem to have a single pair of wings and three ‘tails’ for lack of a better term. I was fishing all day and these seemed to appear in greater number in the late afternoon to evening hours and seemed harmless enough.
How you want your letter signed:  Brian

White Mayfly

Dear Brian,
Though we recognized your insect as a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera, its appearance is quite different from other Mayflies in our archives.  We identified your individual as a White Mayfly, possibly
Ephoron album which is pictured on BugGuide, and though BugGuide does not report any sightings in Arizona, there are sightings from nearby Colorado and Utah.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Friendly winged insect
Location: South Pasadena, CA
August 12, 2017 7:19 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman,
This bug alighted on my plate this evening at dinner on the patio. Curious to know what it is.
Signature: Emily

Mayfly

Dear Emily,
This is a Mayfly, and we are confident it is in the genus
Callibaetis which we discovered on Wayne’s Word and we verified on BugGuide that it might be Callibaetis pallidus.  Another species in the genus pictured on BugGuide that looks quite similar is Callibaetis californicus.  Mayfly nymphs are aquatic, so there must be some nearby body of water that will allow the nymphs to develop.  Winged adults are feeble fliers that cannot travel great distances.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: River bug
Location: Pacific Northwest USA
August 11, 2017 11:05 pm
Hi! I have been swimming in the Mohawk River in Marcola Oregon my entire life. I have never seen one of these little critters before. It was tiny. I caught it and released. Reminded me of a scorpion. It had fluttering fins(?) behind its legs. I am wondering if it is a larva or?
Signature: Johanna Leighty

Spiny Crawler Mayfly Naiad

Dear Johanna,
The aquatic larvae of flying insects with incomplete metamorphosis including Dragonflies and Stoneflies are known collectively as naiads.  We believe this is a Naiad of a Spiny Crawler Mayfly from the family Ephemerellidae based on this and other BugGuide images, but we are unable to provide a conclusive species identification.  Here is another similar looking individual posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange prehistoric water dweller
Location: Little grass valley reservoir california
July 2, 2017 7:21 pm
This bug was caught chasing my husband as we swam in a lake. It has what looks like feathers along it’s back side and pinchers.
Signature: However

Mayfly Nymph

This is the aquatic nymph or naiad of a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.  Anglers often devote major portions of websites to insects used as bait, so we found nice images that match yours posted to Fly Fishing God and Trout Nut as well as on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “most nymphs develop in streams and rivers that are well-oxygenated and relatively free of pollution; some species develop in lakes or ponds, usually in shallow water where the oxygen content is highest.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination