Currently viewing the category: "Mayflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Friendly winged insect
Location: South Pasadena, CA
August 12, 2017 7:19 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman,
This bug alighted on my plate this evening at dinner on the patio. Curious to know what it is.
Signature: Emily

Mayfly

Dear Emily,
This is a Mayfly, and we are confident it is in the genus
Callibaetis which we discovered on Wayne’s Word and we verified on BugGuide that it might be Callibaetis pallidus.  Another species in the genus pictured on BugGuide that looks quite similar is Callibaetis californicus.  Mayfly nymphs are aquatic, so there must be some nearby body of water that will allow the nymphs to develop.  Winged adults are feeble fliers that cannot travel great distances.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: River bug
Location: Pacific Northwest USA
August 11, 2017 11:05 pm
Hi! I have been swimming in the Mohawk River in Marcola Oregon my entire life. I have never seen one of these little critters before. It was tiny. I caught it and released. Reminded me of a scorpion. It had fluttering fins(?) behind its legs. I am wondering if it is a larva or?
Signature: Johanna Leighty

Spiny Crawler Mayfly Naiad

Dear Johanna,
The aquatic larvae of flying insects with incomplete metamorphosis including Dragonflies and Stoneflies are known collectively as naiads.  We believe this is a Naiad of a Spiny Crawler Mayfly from the family Ephemerellidae based on this and other BugGuide images, but we are unable to provide a conclusive species identification.  Here is another similar looking individual posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange prehistoric water dweller
Location: Little grass valley reservoir california
July 2, 2017 7:21 pm
This bug was caught chasing my husband as we swam in a lake. It has what looks like feathers along it’s back side and pinchers.
Signature: However

Mayfly Nymph

This is the aquatic nymph or naiad of a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.  Anglers often devote major portions of websites to insects used as bait, so we found nice images that match yours posted to Fly Fishing God and Trout Nut as well as on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “most nymphs develop in streams and rivers that are well-oxygenated and relatively free of pollution; some species develop in lakes or ponds, usually in shallow water where the oxygen content is highest.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Damselfly?
Location: Nottingham, UK
June 4, 2017 6:56 am
Pic taken in Nottingham, UK, June 2017
Signature: Gerold Baier

Mayfly

Dear Gerold,
Your image is beautiful.  This is NOT a Damselfly.  It is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.  We found a perfect match to your individual on Wildlife Trust, but alas, it is not identified to the species level, though the site does state:  “There are 51 species of mayfly in Britain. They are common around freshwater wetlands, from fast-flowing rivers to still lakes, where the larvae spend their lives underwater feeding on algae and plants. The adults hatch out, usually in the summer, and have very short lives (just hours in some cases) during which they display and breed; hatchings of hundreds of adult mayflies in the same spot at the same time often occur. Many species do not feed as adults as their sole purpose is to reproduce and once they have mated, they die. The common name is misleading as many mayflies can be seen all year-round, although one species does emerge in synchrony with the blooming of Hawthorn (or ‘Mayflower’).”  We believe we have identified your species as
Ephemera vulgata thanks to BugLife which states:  “Mayflies are unique as insects in having two winged adult stages. After emerging from the water they fly to the bank where they shelter on the underside of leaves or in the grass. They then moult again, leaving behind their drab ‘dun’ skin to reveal their shiny ‘spinner’ skin. Following this moult they fly back to the water and form mating swarms dancing above the surface.”  We are post-dating your submission to go live to our site later in the month while our editorial staff is away on holiday.

Fascinating! Thank you for the reply
I need to correct the data on the photograph: it was taken on 2nd June 2017 on the banks of the Derwent River in Rowsley, Derbyshire, UK
postcode DE4 2EB.
The mayfly is sitting on a red car. I attach another image where the reflection is nice.
Gerold

Mayfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: larvae insect
Location: Los Angeles
August 19, 2016 4:08 am
Hi,
Since a week, my house wall outside is filled with 100-200 tiny larvae.
I live in Los Angeles. I would say they are 4-5mm long maybe.
Thanks!
Signature: Rafael

Mayfly Exuvia, we believe

Mayfly Exuvia, we believe

Hi Rafael,
Do you live near the LA River or some other body of water?  Or, do you have a pond in your yard?  This looks like the aquatic larva of a Mayfly, or more accurately, the exuvia of a Mayfly.  When they near maturity, the aquatic naiads climb out of the water and molt, flying off as a subadult.  The subadult of a Mayfly is one of the only insects that molts a second time once it is winged, eventually emerging as a mature adult Mayfly.  Since the larvae are aquatic, they need a body of water in which to develop.  Do the larvae move?  If not, then they are simply the exuviae, or cast-off exoskeletons.

Thanks for your answer.
We live about 2 blocks ~8 minutes walk from the LA river which is really the suburban area…all concrete.
There are 2 swimming pools nearby neighbors, but they are usually taking care if them. Otherwise no other water besides sprinklers.
Thanks
Rafael

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I found a weird googly eyed bug
Location: Tangent, Oregon, United states
August 7, 2016 3:34 pm
I was at a park and found this strange bug with 4 legs and big white googly eyes I can’t find any info anywhere can you help me identify it please? it was awfully cute!
Signature: Jessica

Mayfly

Mayfly

Dear Jessica,
This is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination