Currently viewing the category: "Louse"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Parasites (2nd try)
October 17, 2010
I took away some pics but there are deep red ones that were skinny long types too. Dr’s don’t know what the are but larva was on hair & follicles thoughout body burrwing in skin as if it was threaded under now but adults only on scalp (they didn’t believe me that’s why it was allowed to mature) used lice treatment but didn’t work so if you could give me any info I would desperately appreciate it! When i first thought it was a parasite started last year June yet noticed first symptoms of being sick a couple of years back. Had been in northern NJ, Penn at Lake 26 days before first skin eruption but  I live in northern CA-Sonoma County, laundry is on back deck under half roof open to redwood tree & a wild raccoon & squrriel was seen on clothes before, I also held a baby snake not knowing it’s gut was busted open and only used hand sanitizer @ time. Mexico over the Texas border plus Cabo San Lucus, Az desert were I was bit standing by a Yucca plant on foot leaving 3 puncture marks & Taos high desert where I fed Mag Pies & other birds on the same table we would sit at and have coffee plus took off the snow to make homemade icream) & breakfast (I’m careful today about germs & bugs micro world and sanitation), Hawaii caves and Tahiti the Atolls with wild chickens + Moorea  thatched roof bungalow all were I have been before getting sick but the bugs are the only tangible things fir the docs to go on as I have many skin blisters where it felt on fire, things in nostrils & too many symptoms I don’t think you would be interested in but I’m sorry I can’t be of more help in the identity process as I don’t know where I got them plus there are not pics but there were ones with crossed thatched wings    Long and narrow all bug range from pinhead to about 3mm. Thank you for you time-Chante’

Human Lice we believe

Dear Chante’,
We sympathize with your situation, and many of the things you have included in your email are not related to the problem of the creatures depicted in your photographs.  They appear to our unschooled eyes to be Human Lice, , but in matters that require a medical diagnosis, we always urge the person to seek professional medical attention.  You can show the professionals the images on BugGuide for comparison.

Human Lice we believe

Thank you again, I will show my Dr. your website.
Sincerely, Chante’

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats that big please?
Hello, i found this bug on my fish, can anyone tell me what is it? thanx and is it harmful to my whole tank now? i found it on my sick fish that has black spots all over it, then today i saw this bug, so i quarantined the fish and removed this bug to a cup alone for further investigation, please help me with my questions if you can, thank you
Sincerely,
Adel M. Ammari

Hi Adel,
This is a Fish Louse, Argulus species. We are posting your letter with a link to a site called the FishDoc, The Home of Fish Health, that talks about treatment. You should treat immediately to avoid an infestation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This bug was found on an item of clothing (right before putting it on). It had somehow burrowed within the clothing material. Your help is much appreciated.
charlie

Hi Charlie,
Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you have a Human Louse, probably Pediculus humanus. Hogue has something to say about this bane to humankind. “Like the bedbug, this menace to human beings is not as prevalent today as in the past because of improved public and personal hygiene. Yet it still pops up here and there, most often among school children and indigents, and it remains the lone true companion of the hobo. This is a sucking louse found only on humans, to whom it causes much discomfort in exchange for its meal of blood. Two forms are known: the head louse infests the hair of the scalp, and the body louse lives in clothing near the body surface. Both are small (1/16 to 3/16 in.) and oval, with pointed legs. Unfed individuals are flat and yellowish to medium brown in color; after injesting blood they are swollen and show a dark clot of blood in the abdomen. Bites of the Human Louse cause a slight local reaction accompanied by itching. … In the vernacular, the Human Louse is known as the ‘Cootie.’ Its eggs, which are firmly attached to the hairs of the head and body, are the familiar ‘nits.'”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination