Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"

(12/26/2005)
” Oh, my! Neither one. I’d be willing to bet it is the larva of an owlfly (Ascalaphidae). Overall appearance, and behavior, are right for that family. Hesitate to be conclusive because there are other families of Neuroptera in that part of the world that are not represented in North America. Still, I”m reasonably confident that is what it is. Cool! Eric”

Weird bug looks like a dobsonfly and yellow jacket mixed
Hi,
My wife and I found this bug in our house on the curtains. I have never seen one before so there’s no worries or anything, I was just curious and wanted to find out what it was. I looked all over the internet and can’t find it, but after coming across your site, I figured maybe you could help? We live in the Willamette Valley in Oregon. I saw pictures of dobsonfly’s and it looks similar to that but it has a longer neck and a body like a yellow jacket with a long tail (maybe a stinger???). I look forward to hearing from you!
P.S. Thanks for the great website, I find it very fascinating! 🙂
Andy

Dear Andy,
You have taken a photograph of a Common Snakefly, Agulla species. They can be recognized by their elongated prothorax and projecting head. Adults feed on small soft-bodies insects including young scale insects, aphids and mites, and are beneficial to farmers and gardeners. They are members of the order of Nerve-Winged Insects, Neuroptera that also include Dobsonflies.

Hello,
I got busy and never had a chance to reply and thank you. Thank you for identifying the insect and replying so quickly! I love your site and hope you continue to run it for years to come. You provide a very unique and excellent service. Thanks again.
Andy

WHAT IS THE SCIENTIFIC NAME FOR THE DOODLE BUG?

The doodlebug is the larval form of the Antlion. The doodlebug digs a pit in the sand and waits for ants and other insects to fall into its waiting jaws. The adults are winged. The scientific name of the Family is Myrmeleontidae. There are over 89 North American species, and a common one is Dendroleon obsoletum.

Hi Bugman.
I found this insect at a wildlife refuge in northwest Colorado. At first I thought it was a damsel fly, but when I got a better look it doesn’t appear to be that at all. It’s overall length was a little less than 2 inches, and there were several of them flying about and hiding in tall grass not far from a pond. An ID on this guy would really help me out. Thanks, Tom W.
Dear Tom,
It is an Antlion, Family Myrmeleontidae. The larvae are called Doodle Bugs and they bury themselves in the sand at the bottom of a pit and wait for other insects, including ants, to fall into their waiting jaws. Adults are feeble fliers and are attracted to lights.

Hi! When I lived in Alabama as a child there was a bug that lived in the ground that we call a "doodlebug" or a "pinchin bug" because of the big pinchers it had…..it would burrow straw sized holes and back into it…..we as kids would put broom straw in the hole and wait until it started to wiggle then jerk the straw out and hanging from it by it’s pinchers would be the ugliest meanest looking little bug/worm thing less than an inch long. What was it?
Stacey

Hi Stacey,
Your Doodle Bugs are the larvae of Ant Lions, Family Myrmeleontidae, winged insects that resemble Lacewings.


Hi, y’all….I just got back from a trip to Big Bend National Park in Texas, where I saw a fox, deer, javalinas, hawks and other assorted wildlife…..including this bug in a rest stop bathroom somewhere near Ozona TX. What’s that bug, Daniel?
I also visited the Chinati Foundation…home of Donald Judd sculptures and other delights. I took a very short boat ride over to Mexico for some beer and tacos, and went to a "star party" at the McDonald Observatory too.
Now I’m back, but I’m still wondering….what’s that bug?
Peace, Jonathan

Hi Jonathan,
This appears to be an adult Antlion