Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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whats this bug ?
This bug has been hanging out on our living room ceiling for 3 days, in the same spot !? It’s just over an inch in length. We live in Kamloops B.C. Canada, and were wondering if you know what it is? We think it’s some kind of moth but we are curious to know more about it,considering its decided to move in with us : ) We attached a better, bigger picture…. hope it helps.
Heidi and Keiffer

Hello there Heidi and Keiffer,
This is a Giant Lacewing, Polystoechotes species. These are the largest North American Neuropterans. At night they are sometimes attracted to lights which probably explains its presence in your home. According to the Audubon Guide, little is known of the life cycle.

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praying mantis
Hi,
My name is Mary I live in lexington Ky. I recently found what i think is a new species of pray mantis. He is disguised as a wasp. He has the upper torso of a normal mantid, but he has the lower abdomen of a wasp, wings identical to a wasp and four wasp legs. He can fly but only short distances. I e-mailed you once before but had no response so i thought i would try again. Please help me out. Has this ever been reported or seen before.
thank you
Mary
ps: Here is a picture of who we call "Wobby"

Hi Mary,
Wobby is a Brown Mantidfly, Climaciella brunnea. Mantidflies, also known as Mantispids, resemble true mantises but are actually Neuropterans. Evolution has led them on a similar path, and they hunt in a similar manner, using their formidable front legs to grasp onto prey. They are relatively common in the South.

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Result of bug love?Hi, Bugman,
For your ID’ing pleasure, here’s a photo of a what we suppose are (were?) bug eggs on the outside of a window in our house in the woods in southern West Virginia. Each stalk is about 3/16 inch, including the little blob at the end. The blobs were originally rather transparent, with a tan dot in the center. The next day Julian noticed that they were white; they’ve been white ever since (several weeks). For what it’s worth, the spider that lives at the edge of this window apparently doesn’t consider the blobs and stalks to be food. Can you please tell us what they are and what you think accounted for the change in appearance (and anything pertinent that we haven’t thought to ask)?
Many thanks!
Ellen and Julian
Victor , West Virginia
PS: For about 9 months last year we watched a similar group (with white blobs) on the outside of another window and didn’t see any change in them. We were hoping that they would hatch into something!

Hi Ellen and Julian,
Mother Nature has developed this ingenious method to perpetuate the Lacewing. Immature lacewings are fierce hunters, and if eggs hatched, the young would quickly devour one another. The female Lacewing deposits each egg at the end of a stalk, so by the time a newly hatched Aphid Wolf or Aphid Lion climbs down, its brothers and sisters have already wandered away.

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"Giraffe" bug?
Hi there,
I encountered this interesting bug on a recent hike, and would LOVE to know what the heck it is. Thanks for your time and your excellent service.
Cheers,
Numlok

Hi Numlok,
We were a little too busy to answer mail yesterday, and we are thrilled that you used the site to identify your Snakefly without any further assistance from us.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

neuropteran?
Insect below observed July 27, 2005 in Jackson County, Alabama. On siding of house next to light left on all night. Size about 5+ cm . What’s that bug? Clear wings with lots of veins and the terminal ends of the forewing look liked they were dipped in wax.
Some sort of neuropteran?
Paul

Hi Paul,
We searched on BugGuide for a species name for your Antlion, which is in fact a Neuropteran. We believe it to be in the genus Glenurus, maybe G. gratus. Would you mind if we also posted your image on BugGuide?

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Aphid Wolf?
I stumbled across your website while trying to identify a bug I’ve sporadically seen since I was a kid. I never knew what they were, and after finally getting a good photograph of one I thought I’d try to identify it. Judging by one of the blurry photos on your site, I’d guess this is an Aphid Wolf, or as you say the larva of a Brown Lacewing. If I’m right, feel free to add this photo to your website. If I’m wrong, please enlighten me.
Thanks,
Walker

Hi Walker,
I guess even a blurry photo is better than no photo, but thanks to you, we now have a good photo of a Brown Lacewing Larva, or Aphid Wolf. They belong to the Family Hemerobiidae and the larvae sometimes carry debris around on their backs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination