Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"

Subject:  Little Ferry of a bug super long Wings super long antennas awesome giant eyeballs
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio on my window curtain
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  me and my ex-boyfriend are autistic we wanted to be entomologist as children this insect gets all of my honor what is he or she please I love this little baby look at how cute his eyeball is I got a super big close up picture coming for you
How you want your letter signed :  Mister cute big bug man eyeball

Green Lacewing

This is a predatory Green Lacewing in the family Chrysopidae and they are sometimes called Golden-Eyes.

Subject:  Mantis?
Geographic location of the bug:  Corpus Christi, Texas
Date: 05/29/2018
Time: 11:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! Can you help me identify this flying bug? I THINK it only has 4 legs, so it’s not REALLY an insect, is it? It was on a friend’s porch last week.
How you want your letter signed:  B. McCray

Mantispid

Dear B. McCray,
Though it resembles a Mantis, this Mantispid is a member of an unrelated insect order, the Neuropterans that includes Lacewings and Antlions.  Both Mantids and Mantispids are predators that have adapted to using raptorial front legs for capturing prey.  We believe your individual is 
Dicromantispa interrupta based on this BugGuide image.

One quick question, tho – I know this isn’t a “praying” mantis – but I see “mantis” in the title “Mantispid” – so, are they related?
Thank you!!!
B. McCray
We repeat:  “Though it resembles a Mantis, this Mantispid is a member of an unrelated insect order, the Neuropterans that includes Lacewings and Antlions.”
Isn’t it odd, then for the word “mantis” to be part of the official word of what it is? It just seems confusing. 
But thanks!
Common names are often descriptive, and the resemblance between true Mantids and this Mantispid is being acknowledged in the name.  P.S.  Your submission is Bug of the Month for June 2018.
Oooo, that’s cool!! I just moved out into the Tecas Hill Country, wo we have a LOT of odd looking bugs I may ask you about.
Is that okay?

 

Subject:  Which insect is this? Pls tell if its harmful ?
Geographic location of the bug:  India ; U.P.
Date: 04/03/2018
Time: 06:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this insect and tell me   about it
How you want your letter signed:  Imrose

Ribbon Winged Lacewing

Dear Imrose,
This is a Ribbon Winged Lacewing in the family Nemopteridae, and we believe it might be in the genus
Chasmatoptera because of a drawing posted to Wikipedia.  It is not harmful.  Lacewings are predators that will help control populations of other insects. 

Ribbon Winged Lacewing

Subject:  insects
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama Canal area
Date: 04/04/2018
Time: 01:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you help me identify some of these insects I saw in Panama, near the Canal?
How you want your letter signed:  moabdds

Owlfly Larva

Dear moabdds,
The insect on the leaf is the larva of an insect in the order Neuroptera, probably an Owlfly larva based on this image posted to FlickR.  The larvae of Owlflies are predators.

Subject:  Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Central West western australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 06:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these many times over my lifetime but never known what they are. I have tried to find info via Google and the closest thing I’ve found is cicada.
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Helen

Antlion

Dear Helen,
This is an Antlion, not a Cicada.  The larvae of Antlions are frequently called Doodlebugs.

Subject:  BUG
Geographic location of the bug:  Berkeley Heights, New Jersey
Date: 02/07/2018
Time: 11:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this Bug in my towel in the bathroom
It looks scary, and I have a 2 year old and a 4 year old..  should I be concered
Thank you very much
How you want your letter signed:  thank you

Doodlebug

This looks to us like the larva of an Antlion, commonly called a Doodlebug.  It poses no threat to your children, but it is a predator and it is possible a mild pinch might occur because of the prominent mandibles if one of your children tries to catch and hold the Doodlebug.  The big mystery for us is “why was it in your home in a towel in the middle of the winter?”  Most Doodlebugs dig in sandy soil, waiting at the bottom of a pit for ants and other unwary insects to tumble into their open jaws.

Doodlebug