Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Egg display
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulf Coast
Date: 10/15/2017
Time: 06:37 PM EDT
Found this lovely little display on my patio today. Any chance you know who may have left it?
How you want your letter signed:  A.

Lacewing Eggs

Dear A.,
These are Lacewing Eggs.

Thank you! We love your site and appreciate your help!
A.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sperm cillia
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisiana
Date: 10/12/2017
Time: 07:45 PM EDT
I found these organisms attached to multiple surfaces outside my home.  It hides and  attaches itself underneath wood, metal, and plastic. The way they arrange themselves is unique and of different patterns
How you want your letter signed:  T. Myers

Lacewing Eggs

Dear T. Myers,
The female Lacewing has evolved so that she lays her eggs on stalks to help prevent the ravenous larvae from devouring one another when they hatch.  Young Lacewings are called Aphid Wolves.

Lacewing Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect lays these eggs?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, South East Queensland
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 09:38 AM EDT
I’ve been seeing these little clusters of tiny white eggs on long slender stalks in odd places around the house eg, on the internal stairwell, bathroom window, etc. They really are tiny, the whole cluster covers an area no larger than a thumbnail & the eggs are smaller than poppy seeds.  In this pic it looks like they’ve hatched.. What are they?!
How you want your letter signed:  Renee

Lacewing Eggs

Dear Renee,
We are nearly certain these are Lacewing Eggs, but we won’t rule out they might be the Eggs of a different member of the order Neuroptera.  Lacewings have extremely predatory larvae, and they have evolved to lay eggs in this manner to help ensure higher survival rates so the hatchling larvae don’t cannibalize each other.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug wearing a ghillie suit?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Oklahoma
Date: 10/03/2017
Time: 04:45 PM EDT
My mom brought me this bug cause usually I can identify them for her, sometimes with the help of Google and this website lol.   But I’ve never seen anything like this.  It looks like a bug covered in debris, but I can’t scrap off the debris…  I have a video of it and tried to get pics, but it’s so small picture is difficult
How you want your letter signed:  Brandon Boudreaux

Debris-Carrying Lacewing Larva

Dear Brandon,
This is a predatory debris-carrying Lacewing Larva.  The larvae of Green Lacewings often camouflage themselves with debris including carcasses of their prey.  Your individual has adorned itself with the carcass of an ant. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flying insect covered in white hairs
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeast Florida
Date: 09/30/2017
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
I’ve been living in Florida all my life but this is a first. I did not kill it or disturb it.I just took a picture it.I was at a park and it was resting on a fence post.Can you tell me the name of this thing and what it does?
How you want your letter signed:  George M

Antlion

Dear George,
This is an Antlion in the genus
Vella.  The common name refers to the larvae, also called Doodle Bugs, that live in sandy soil at the bottom of a pit where they wait with only their mandibles exposed, ready to eat anything that tumbles into the pit. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possible lacewing
Geographic location of the bug:  Lesbos
Date: 09/22/2017
Time: 07:50 AM EDT
Hi Daniel,
Another one for you.
It looks like a lacewing but doesn’t have the wing extensions.
I can’t find it on the internet and would appreciate your help as I would like to use the image in a talk to an RSPB group,
Regards,
How you want your letter signed:  William Smiton

Antlion

Dear William,
This is an Antlion, and they are classified with Lacewings as members of the order Neuroptera.  We believe we have identified your Antlion as
Palpares libelluloides thanks to Ray Wilson Bird Photography where it states:  “Adult antlions can easily be mistaken for dragonflies or damselflies, especially impressive species such as Palpares libelluloides, the largest of the European antlions. They can all be readily distinguished from the Odonata, however, by their thickly clubbed antennae.”  According to iNaturalist:  “This species is widespread in the Mediterranean regions and it is mainly present in Albania, Bulgaria, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Romania, Spain and Turkey. It can be found in thickets and rocky slopes up to about 1000 meters above sea level.”

Many thanks Daniel. That will assist greatly with my talk, regards

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination