Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tan Winged Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Tujunga, CA
Date: 01/08/2019
Time: 11:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been seeing these bugs in my house recently hanging out in the corners where the ceiling meets the wall.
How you want your letter signed:  James

Brown Lacewing

Dear James,
Though your image lacks critical sharpness, we are relatively certain this is a Brown Lacewing, a beneficial predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this egg on my woody plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 07:32 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest time is fast approaching, and I am inspecting my colas for dreaded Budworms, and I have learned to recognize their eggs, but I noticed a few different eggs I would like identified.  They are on a stalk.
Thanks for your time.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Lacewing Egg

Dear Constant Gardener,
We suspect we will get a few comments from our readers regarding the content of your image, but the stalked egg in the lower left corner was laid by a Green Lacewing.  Green Lacewings are predators, and their larvae are commonly called Aphid Wolves.

Mel Frank Comments
Yes, they are all over my plants, every year. It’s one of the reasons I have had only very minor insect infestations and is a main reason I don’t use insecticides–I don’t want to kill the biological helpers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green mantis looking bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Oregon coast
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 04:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Me and my friends have ran into these a few times now. Even though I’ve spent a while looking I can’t figure out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Your help is very much appreciated

Green Lacewing

The Green Lacewing is sometimes called a Golden-Eye.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Ocean City Maryland
Date: 08/14/2018
Time: 09:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this insect or bug on a fence post on the dunes August 14, 2018. Do you know what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Dee Lis

Antlion

Dear Dee,
This is an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae.  Larvae are called Doodlebugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Eggs on a hand
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma  United States
Date: 08/03/2018
Time: 01:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:n  A bug laid eggs oon my friend’s hand. Creepy but cool too.  Can you identify the bug egg?
How you want your letter signed:  Lee walker

Lacewing Eggs

Dear Lee,
When we initially read your subject line, we really didn’t have much hope we would be of any assistance, however, the eggs of Lacewings are so distinctive, we had no trouble.  The Lacewing has adapted to lay its egg on a stalk so that when each egg hatches, the larval Lacewing, commonly called an Aphid Wolf, it has to crawl down the stalk before it can begin to forage for prey.  Lacewing larvae have ferocious appetites and they will eat any small creature they encounter.  This adaptation helps to prevent cannibalism.  We are curious though, how this managed to happen without your friend noticing the insect, because no description of the Lacewing is included in your request.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Smart Tail
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania
Date: 07/31/2018
Time: 03:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
I have a pepper plant that some aphids infested. I took it outside in hopes of some ladybugs would predate them. I checked on the plant the next day, and the aphids were still there, but very docile.  I also noticed this weird bug on the bottom with the aphids.  It didn’t move at all when I turned the leaf over and examined it. I then pinched the leaf off the plant and placed the leaf on the porch to examine the bug better. It then moved very, VERY quickly to the top of the leaf, which was now facing the porch and therefore shady. I flipped the leaf over again, and the bug continuously sought shade.  It used its tail-abdomen in a very intellectual way; it seemed like it used its tail the way a monkey would, to grasp and hold onto things. It had six paper-thin legs and surprisingly long pincer-like mouthparts.  Its body appeared translucent and the colors are actually the organs. I think it may be the larval stage of some insect. It was about three aphids in length.  I didn’t want to capture it and possibly kill an unknown species, so I returned the leaf to the pot and rested it on the edge. I examined the plant the next day and all the aphids were gone, as well as the unknown bug. I don’t want to assume that the bug ate all the aphids, but something definitely ate everything because there was nothing left. I have not seen any aphids on the plant since nor have I seen this weird little guy.  Can you help me out in identifying this bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Kayla

Aphid Wolf

Dear Kayla,
Your observations and deductions are fascinating.  Your assumption that this Lacewing Larva, commonly called an Aphid Wolf, ate the Aphids is most likely correct.  Though Lady Beetles are most commonly thought of as Aphid predators, Lacewings, both adult and larval, and Flower Fly larvae are probably more effective at controlling Aphids.

Lacewing Larva (right side) with Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination