Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Cyprus
Date: 09/21/2017
Time: 08:01 AM EDT
Hey bug man, what’s this bug?!
How you want your letter signed:  Jade

Antlion

Dear Jade,
This Neuropteran is commonly called an Antlion, and the larvae of many species are subterranean predators that wait buried at the bottom of a pit for ants and other insects to tumble into their waiting mandibles.  Larvae are called Doodlebugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Scary bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 09/02/2017
Time: 06:27 PM EDT
We saw this on our back porch and tried to identify it on the internet. The closest we found was a dobsonfly, but our bug has fuzzy legs and mandibles and clear wings and none of the photos on the internet show this.
How you want your letter signed:  Kim

Antlion

Hi Kim,
We feel quite confident that your harmless Antlion is
Vella americana based on its visual resemblance to the individual in this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “very large–wingspan to circa 125 mm, body length circa 50 mm.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What species of Mantis is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, WV
August 29, 2017 6:29 AM
I found this little guy trapped in a spider web while working on a rooftop air conditioner.
I’ve never seen a mantis like this on, very tiny (about the size of my thumbnail) was mostly black with yellow/green spots around. Had a bumpy abdomen and long slender neck.
How you want your letter signed:  Jacob

Mantispid

Dear Jacob,
This is not a Mantis.  It is an unrelated insect that has evolved to look similar to a Preying Mantis because it has a similar hunting style, using raptorial front legs to capture and hold prey while feeding.  This is a Mantispid or Mantisfly, and we believe it is
Leptomantispa pulchella.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Dominican republic
August 27, 2017 2:53 PM
Hi, while hiking on Quinicua Dominican Republic, found this cicada and a butterfly? i though at first it was a dragonfly but then saw the antenna, do you have any idea what it is.
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Suzette

Owlfly

Dear Suzette,
This is not a Butterfly, but rather an Owlfly in the family Ascalaphidae.  The first time we received an image of an Owlfly from Italy many years ago, we didn’t know what we were looking at since Owlflies seem to have characteristics from so many insect orders.  Owlflies are in the order Neuroptera, and they are classified with Lacewings and Antlions.  Here is an image from BugGuide and the BugGuide description is “Bizarre creatures that look like a cross between a dragonfly and a butterfly. The body resembles that of other neuropterans, more-or-less, but the prominent antennae are clubbed like those of butterflies. Key characters:  Medium to large size, Clubbed antennae, Eyes large and bulge out from head, may rest in cryptic posture with abdomen projecting from perch, resembling a twig.”  We are unable to locate any information on species from Dominican Republic, but we did find images of Owlflies from Costa Rica on Quaoar Power Zoo.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Corpses bearing insect
Location: Guatemala, Lake Atitlan
August 4, 2017 9:21 pm
Dear bugman,
one night i saw what looked like a ball of fluff walking in my room.
I garbed my macro lens and discover it was actually some kind of insect, bearing corpses of other insects. It measure between 5mm long and look a bit like an ant.
WTB?!..
Signature: David

Debris Carrying Lacewing Larva

Wow David,
Your image is awesome.  This is one of the best images we have ever received of a debris-carrying Lacewing Larva.

Thanks for the kind words and the identification. 🙂
It is indeed a lacewing larva. Do you know wich region of the world it can be found ? I saw pictures from Europe and America. Seems like a quite common insect, but it is the first time i saw one of those.

Apparently there are debris-carrying Lacewing Larvae in many parts of the world, including Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis??
Location: Toronto, Canada
July 26, 2017 7:31 pm
Hello bugman!
It’s been a while since my last request, but here’s one for you. This was found inside here in Ontario, Canada, in August. It was about 1/2inch long with curiosly large pincers, a type or stage of mantis??
Thanks
Signature: Kyle

Mantispid

Dear Kyle,
As its common name implies, this Mantispid or Mantisfly does bear an uncanny resemblance to its namesake, however, Mantispids are classified with Lacewings and Antlions as Neuropterans, and they are not even closely related to Mantids.  They have evolved to have similar appearances because of the way they hunt.  Based on BugGuide images, we believe your Mantispid is
Leptomantispa pulchella.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination