Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonfly like bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia
Date: 11/24/2017
Time: 05:46 AM EDT
There is this bug that looks like a dragonfly but is like a noctrural bug
How you want your letter signed:  Oliver lee

Blue Eyes Lacewing

Dear Oliver,
This elegant looking, but feeble flying predator is a Blue Eyes Lacewing which you can verify on the Insects of Brisbane site where it states:  “They have a pair of transparent wings of about equal size. When fly, they may be mistaken as dragonflies. But their wings are fold in tent shape whish dragonflies do not do. They can also distinguished by their long antenna. Adult body is orange-brown in colour, with iridescent grey eyes. The moniliform antennae are black with pale apex. Legs are pale yellow. Their transparence wings are narrow with a white marking on the wing tips.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hi
Geographic location of the bug:  Huntington Beach, California
Date: 11/20/2017
Time: 02:23 PM EDT
What is this bug!!!
How you want your letter signed:  I love bugs this is a cool website!!!

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewings like the one in your image are sometimes called Goldeneyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Egg display
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulf Coast
Date: 10/15/2017
Time: 06:37 PM EDT
Found this lovely little display on my patio today. Any chance you know who may have left it?
How you want your letter signed:  A.

Lacewing Eggs

Dear A.,
These are Lacewing Eggs.

Thank you! We love your site and appreciate your help!
A.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sperm cillia
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisiana
Date: 10/12/2017
Time: 07:45 PM EDT
I found these organisms attached to multiple surfaces outside my home.  It hides and  attaches itself underneath wood, metal, and plastic. The way they arrange themselves is unique and of different patterns
How you want your letter signed:  T. Myers

Lacewing Eggs

Dear T. Myers,
The female Lacewing has evolved so that she lays her eggs on stalks to help prevent the ravenous larvae from devouring one another when they hatch.  Young Lacewings are called Aphid Wolves.

Lacewing Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What insect lays these eggs?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia, South East Queensland
Date: 10/11/2017
Time: 09:38 AM EDT
I’ve been seeing these little clusters of tiny white eggs on long slender stalks in odd places around the house eg, on the internal stairwell, bathroom window, etc. They really are tiny, the whole cluster covers an area no larger than a thumbnail & the eggs are smaller than poppy seeds.  In this pic it looks like they’ve hatched.. What are they?!
How you want your letter signed:  Renee

Lacewing Eggs

Dear Renee,
We are nearly certain these are Lacewing Eggs, but we won’t rule out they might be the Eggs of a different member of the order Neuroptera.  Lacewings have extremely predatory larvae, and they have evolved to lay eggs in this manner to help ensure higher survival rates so the hatchling larvae don’t cannibalize each other.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug wearing a ghillie suit?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Oklahoma
Date: 10/03/2017
Time: 04:45 PM EDT
My mom brought me this bug cause usually I can identify them for her, sometimes with the help of Google and this website lol.   But I’ve never seen anything like this.  It looks like a bug covered in debris, but I can’t scrap off the debris…  I have a video of it and tried to get pics, but it’s so small picture is difficult
How you want your letter signed:  Brandon Boudreaux

Debris-Carrying Lacewing Larva

Dear Brandon,
This is a predatory debris-carrying Lacewing Larva.  The larvae of Green Lacewings often camouflage themselves with debris including carcasses of their prey.  Your individual has adorned itself with the carcass of an ant. 

Update:  December 1, 2017
Awesome thanks a bunch!  Shortly after I posted this I had the idea to Google “debris bug” cause I had no idea what would use literal debris and body parts.  We discovered it was a lacewing larvae and we were so intrigued.  I went out and put him on a plant in our garden and we watched him climb around for a few minuts.  We actually got to watch him eat aphids as well!  It was so cool to see life on such a small scale still taking it’s course as normal, like I wasn’t even watching!

We wish we could get away with checking our emails every two months.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination