Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Australian Katydid Nymph/ Share the love
Hi "What’s That Bug",
I found your fascinating site when looking for information about katydids, and thought that in the interest of science and bug-lovers everywhere you might appreciate some contributions from Down Under. Attached is a very new, shiny katydid nymph. Also for your "bug lurve" section, please find attached a gratuitous aphid orgy.
Warm regards
Jennifer

Hi Jennifer,
Thanks for your contributions. We aren’t entirely sure the aphids are mating. Many Aphids have generations that reproduce parthenogenetically. The females do not require a mate and give birth to live females. In this way they can reproduce very rapidly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Good Photo of Mormon Cricket
Hi again. I just emailed you some pictures of craneflies and now I’m sending along a picture of a Mormon Cricket I took last year while visiting Idaho. Your site is fantastic for identifying bugs. I did know what kind of cricket this was because a local told me when I took the photo. I wish I had put something down to show the scale, however, I do believe it will be one of the better photos you have of it.
Regards,
Cindy
Ajax, ON CANADA (just east of Toronto)

Hi Cindy,
Sorry for the delay but we had DSL problems (no signal). As we had never seen a Mormon Cricket with such a light coloration, we inquired as to Eric Eaton’s opinion. Here is his response: “Mormon crickets come in a variety of colors, but it could also be something related. Sorry to be non-commital, but sometimes photos just aren’t enough. Eric “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cave Cricket?
Hi again,
My students and I went on an overnight camp in a gravel pit and they found this "little" guy there. It was really huge for a cricket! We think it might be a cave cricket can you confirm this for us? (Saskatchewan, Canada)
Thanks,
Andre

Hi Andre,
We thought this looked like a Mormon Cricket, Anabrus simplex, but we checked with Eric Eaton before responding. Here is what he has to add: “Yeah, looks like SOMETHING in the genus Anabrus anyway (there are more species than just the Mormon “cricket.”) These insects are actually large, wingless katydids, not true crickets. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

grasshopper
Hi…Is this a differentiated grasshopper? It was in the carport today in Silver Lake, near downtown Los Angeles but kinda up in the hills. Thanks…
Brad R

Hi Brad,
The Fork Tailed Bush Katydid is a very common inhabitant in our nearby Mt. Washington garden.
.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

katydid?
Hello,
Thanks for so much info on your site! I tried to match it with one of your previous letters and it looks like it might be a katydid.
Lynda Felder
San Diego, CA

Hi Linda,
This is indeed a Broad Winged Katydid, Microcentrum rhombifolium. We find them in our Los Angeles garden, but the Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid is far more common for us.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Identification, please
Hi – I was wondering if you could help me in identifying this bug? I found it on my zinnia plant – it was the same exact color of the leaf it was sitting on. I could’ve swore it was "hunting" other bugs. Also, LOVE your website! It has been an incredible help to me in identifying many bugs in my garden. Thank you for all your hard work!
Bobbie

Hi Bobbie,
This is a True Katydid or Northern Katydid, Pterophylla camellifolia. It ranges from Massachusetts to Florida and west to Texas and Kansas and northeast to Ontario. It feeds on the foliage of deciduous trees. Both sexes make sounds described as either katy-DID or katy-DIDN’T. It is called the True Katydid because it was the first species to have its call transcribed. All that according to our Audubon Guide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination