Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange green insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Rural western Pennsylvania, Somerset county
Date: 08/03/2018
Time: 06:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this little critter in my bathroom, hanging out on my wall.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, and blessings. Stan.

Male Drumming Katydid

Dear Stan,
This is an introduced male Drumming Katydid,
Meconema thalassinum, which you may verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “A tiny, sea-green katydid with a tympanum fully exposed on each foretibia. Forewings longer than hindwings. No stridulatory area apparent at base of male forewings. Male cerci long, slender, tubular, curving upwards” and the range is “Europe. Introduced into North America; currently Michigan & Ohio east to Atlantic coast; sw. British Columbia to w. Oregon, and likely still expanding. See also BugGuide range map for an indication of the expansion of the range into neighboring states.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green ceiling crawler
Geographic location of the bug:  Dublin, Georgia
Date: 07/31/2018
Time: 12:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy has been crawling on my ceiling the past few days. He hasn’t done any harm, and appears to only move during the night because each day I’ve looked at him before going to bed, and he’s in a new spot the next morning. He doesn’t change position too much after that, if at all. As much as his weirdness has added to my day (because how can he not when he’s hanging above your head?), I would like to know what he is so that when I manage to finally get him down, I can put him in a good spot outside to continue on with his life. Unless him missing his 6th leg is a problem. If it isn’t, hopefully he’ll stay away from houses in the future.
How you want your letter signed:  Sara

Female Katydid

Dear Sara,
Your guy is actually a female Katydid.  Her ovipositor, an organ used to lay eggs, is visible in one of your images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spotted in Turkey
Geographic location of the bug:  Near Mugla, in a forest about 700m above sea level
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 04:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  No idea what this is, and whether it is dangerous. It is approximately 10cm in length
How you want your letter signed:  Gordon

Female Giant Predatory Katydid: Saga natoliae

Dear Gordon,
This is one very impressive Katydid, and the ovipositor indicates it is a female.  Katydids are not considered dangerous, but large individuals might have powerful mandibles that could draw blood if a person tried to handle one carelessly.  We quickly located this eBay image identified as
Saga natoliae that has a $202.50 price tag for its purchase.  According to Pyrgus Orthoptera and their Ecology:  “Saga natoliae is locally endangered by agricultural intensification, overbuilding (urban sprawl, industry, traffic). No roads should be constructed through its habitats!” and “The impressing species (largest European Saltatoria) occurs from the Balkan Peninsula (Greece, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Turkey) across Asia Minor to Caucasia and the Near East.”  Nature Photo calls this the Balkan Sawing Cricket.  According to a comment on TrekNature:  “It is attacking me with all of its 10 cm length! The magnificent creature prefers crickets and lizards though. It presses a lizard to its mighty spines on the thorax and then saws it in two with its mandibles. You find the animal in the Balkans and in Turkey.”

Dear Daniel
Thank you so much, fascinating
Regards
Gordon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  unidentified green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Wayne, Indiana
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 09:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just like to know what this is. Have never seen anything like it.
How you want your letter signed:  Brad Pahmier

Immature Male Common True Katydid

Dear Brad,
We apologize for our delay.  Your identification request was on the back burner so long it fell off the stove, but we went back through our unanswered mail and relocated it.  This is an immature male Katydid, and when we searched for images of immature Katydids from Indiana, we found our own posting from Ohio of a female immature Common True Katydid,
Pterophylla camellifolia.  This BugGuide image of an immature male Common True Katydid looks exactly like your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Name the bug, please
Geographic location of the bug:  Marblehead, MA USA
Date: 07/13/2018
Time: 09:02 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help identify this immature insect. It has been camped out on my wife’s rosebush for the past several days. Our guess is katydid or cricket, but it has no wings (yet).
How you want your letter signed:  Wayne and Susan

Immature Male Katydid

Dear Wayne and Susan,
This is indeed an immature Katydid and it is a male that is lacking an ovipositor.  We believe it looks like this BugGuide image of a member of the subfamily Phaneropterinae.

Immature Male Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Brown Katydid?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Carolina
Date: 07/04/2018
Time: 12:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I am big on insects and always been a huge fan of the site! The website is very helpful and I am very happy it exists!
I am usually on point with my insects but this one female katydid (from what I believe she is) got me pretty stumped. I fed her a banana and she went insane for it! I was able to gain her trust and got some neat photos of her, any idea of what kind of katydid she is?
Hope my photography is helpful! I have more photos if you need more to see of her..I like taking photos of crawlies hehe!
How you want your letter signed:  Lily P.

Eastern Shieldback

Dear Lily,
This is an Eastern Shieldback Katydid in the genus
Atlanticus and according to BugGuide:  “13 spp. in our area” and “Identification of species is challenging.”

Eastern Shieldback Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination