Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some Type of Katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Anderson, Indiana
Date: 09/22/2018
Time: 12:40 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this little Katydid on the flowers in my driveway. It seems somewhat similar to the Meadow Katydids I’ve seen in our yard, but this one was much bigger.
How you want your letter signed:  Christa Massey

Conehead Katydid

Dear Christa,
This is one of the Conehead Katydids in the genus ,
Neoconocephalus.  Because of the extremely long ovipositor that extends well beyond the wing tips, we suspect this might be Neoconocephalus retusus based on this BugGuide image.  Of the entire genus, BugGuide notes:  “Adults feed mostly on seeds of grasses, sometimes sedges. Nymphs feed on grass flowers, developing seeds.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Ocala, Florida
Date: 09/21/2018
Time: 09:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this insect on the outside of our screened lanai.  Any help in identifying it would be greatly appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Nan

Conehead

Dear Nan,
This is a Short-Winged Conehead Katydid in the genus
Belocephalus, and here is a BugGuide image for verification.  According to BugGuide:  “Usually associated with small palms, including saw and cabbage palmettos” and “Has been observed eating palm fronds.”   The ovipositor indicates your individual is female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Meadow Katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Chattanooga, TN
Date: 09/03/2018
Time: 11:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I believe this is a female Meadow Katydid but can’t tell which type.  Thoughts??
How you want your letter signed:  Myra Reneau

Handsome Meadow Katydid

Dear Myra,
Because of the blue eyes, we believe your Meadow Katydid is a Handsome Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum pulchellum, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Note white face with brownish to reddish mottling on edges, brown legs, diffuse turquoise stripe on upper sides back along wings. Eyes usually blue–fairly distinctive.”

Thank you very much for the idea. Feel free to use my photo if you would like to.
Myra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Santa Barbara Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Barbara CA
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 11:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy crawled into our house today.  Can’t figure out what it is! Any thought what it might be? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Alison

Male Mexican Bush Katydid

Dear Alison,
This is a male Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia, and we believe it is the Mexican Bush Katydid, Scudderia mexicana because BugGuide states: “The only Scudderia species found in Los Angeles” with the further elaboration that it “Displaces S. furcata in its southwestern range, and overlaps range in California north from about Monterey County.”  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Like other Katydids, the males are able to make sounds to attract a mate and they are among the chorus of insects that fill the warm summer evenings with sounds.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large gross bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Hilton Head, SC
Date: 08/26/2018
Time: 11:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on my porch… it is about 4-5 inches long, its legs look like a grasshopper, face/antennae  looks like a shrimp. It is expelling a thin brown liquid.
How you want your letter signed:  C. Gates

Round Headed Katydid, we believe

Dear C. Gates,
This is a Katydid, and the ovipositor protruding from the tips of her wings identifies her as female.  We believe this is a Round Headed Katydid in the genus
Amblycorypha based on BugGuide where it states:  “have long legs (hind femora extent almost to tips of tegmina) like Scudderia, but more rounded wings, and overall shape of Microcentrum, though rather more rounded (esp. tegmina), esp. in ♀♀. Top of the head rounded, strongly deflexed. Green, but some species, esp. A. floridana, have a pink phase (some have a yellow phase as well).”  The brown color of your individual is not especially common.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  katydid?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Mill, SC
Date: 08/20/2018
Time: 02:52 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This big one was hanging out on my back door this morning.  In one of the photos you can see his really long antennae. Do you happen to know the proper species name of this one? Amazing how it looks so very similar to a leaf!
How you want your letter signed:  R. Tregay

Greater Angle-Winged Katydid

Dear R. Tregay,
This looks to us like a female Greater Angle Winged Katydid,
Microcentrum rhombifolium, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults active in late summer and fall. September-November (Michigan).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination