Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
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Subject: Katydid?
Location: Japan
October 13, 2016 4:46 am
Found this bug on a bush in a field of tall grass in Osaka, Japan on Ocober 2. It was about 3-4 cm long. As soon as I snapped the picture, it jumped off into grass & hid.
Can you tell me what it is?
Signature: Karen

Katydid:  Gampsocleis buergeri

Katydid: Gampsocleis buergeri

Dear Karen,
We believe we have correctly identified your Katydid as a male
Gampsocleis buergeri on the Natural Japan site where it states:  “These huge katydids (bush-crickets) are everywhere at the moment. They sit perfectly camouflaged on leaves and then half jump, half crawl into the foliage making so much disturbance that it’s like a much larger animal is lurking there. Once you get used to spotting them before they disappear, it’s possible to sneak up and take photos.”  According to National Geographic Creative which has an image of a female of the species with her long ovipositor, this Katydid is called “Kirigirisu” in Japan.

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Subject: Friendly Crickets?
Location: Northeast Georgia
October 8, 2016 9:44 am
Recently, I’ve been making a few Cricket friends, including Katydids every once in a while. My wife has been fascinated how they seem to love to land on me on our porch, and then even follow me inside and sit next to me at my desk. Friendly little buggers… I just calmly talk to them and even handle them when they show up. I even feed and give them water, which they love.
Attached is photo of my newest friend I made last night, landing on my leg and riding inside with me. So he is still here this morning, after he walked all over my office thoughout the night, I picked him up again and put him in the open window. He’s still not going anywhere. lol, drinking his water now.
So I wanted to ask what insight you may have for this behavior? I’ve heard they actually keep them as pets in China? Also, what kind of cricket is this anyway? (He’s the second one that has come to hang out with me)
Also, a katydid that wouldn’t leave my kitchen after I fed him last month, would actually sing to me when I walked in. I’m serious, was wonderful, and he was great.
Signature: Frog

American Shieldback

American Shieldback

Dear Frog,
This is a female American Shieldback,
Atlanticus americanus, a species of Katydid, and the swordlike ovipositor is the feature that identifies her as female.  We verified her identification on BugGuide and according to BugGuide, she is a:  “Predator and scavenger of other insects, but will also feed on live vegetation.”  Insects spend a great percentage of their lives seeking sustenance and water, and though we do not want to downplay your unique relationship with Katydids, when a hungry insect is presented with food, it will eat.  We suspect your own sensitivity to the creatures around you is more of a factor than any overt attraction to you directly, as an individual, by the Katydids.  Once we become aware of the subtle things around us, we notice them more.  We suspect you are more observant, and open-minded than the average person who might encounter a Katydid.

American Shieldback

American Shieldback

You are awesome, and thank you. 😉
In hopes that many more join this state of mind / being.
Your friend,
Frog

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle or katydid cousin?
Location: Oregon (foothills of Mt Hood)
October 8, 2016 3:40 pm
What is this? Saw it in a camp lodge east of Portland Oregon. Lots of evergreen trees around and some small meadows.
Signature: Mama B

Shieldbacked Katydid

Shieldbacked Katydid

Dear Mama B,
This is a Shieldbacked Katydid in the genus
Neduba, based on this image from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of insect is this?
Location: Texas
October 5, 2016 2:19 pm
I need to know what is this?
Signature: Rebecca

Short Winged Katydid

Short Winged Katydid

Dear Rebecca,
We found a very similar image on the Austin Bug Blog that is identified as a female Spoon-tailed Short-winged Katydid,
Dichopetala catinata, where it states:  “Females can be almost all green or have extensive dark markings down their back. I’m not sure if it might be a maturity thing, as the final nymph instar is almost as big as an adult female, and the fact that the wings are mere stubs doesn’t help distinguish a fully mature individual. Besides lacking flight wings, these heavy-bodied katydids do not even seem to use their legs much for jumping, and instead tend to move slowly and rely on camouflage for protection. ”  We verified that identification on BugGuide.  We are confident that the genus is correct, but we cannot say for certain that it isn’t another member in the genus.

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Subject: Beautiful katydid and an elongated long-lawed orbweaver?
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
October 1, 2016 1:29 pm
Hi Bugman,
I’ve had the immense pleasure of working in and around many streams this past summer. You can imagine some of the lovelies I got the opportunity to see! This is Nova Scotia, so we don’t get a whole lot of exotic beauties here ;-), but I’ve always got my eyes peeled. I wanted to share two of the critters I found in my travels. The first I’m hoping to confirm, but I suspect it is an elongated long-jawed orbweaver. I ran into many of the plainer looking long-jaws in and around the culverts and bridges, but this one was different and was not sitting in that typical ‘straightened’ position. The pattern on his or her abdomen is simply gorgeous.
The second photo is of a katydid I spotted hanging out on the ground feasting on something (didn’t notice that part until after I coaxed it onto my hand and it shoved a foot in its mouth and drooled on me, haha). I simply love the angle and the great view of his eyes so I wanted it to go forth into the universe, should I be lucky enough to get this post seen. Forget all the fantastic work experience I got – the bugs I got to see and hold were the highlight of my field work.
Fun notes: People get insanely scared of the massive amounts of incredibly well-fed argiopes in the marsh grasses and it’s hilarious to watch them screech…until a large black wasp creature lands on you and then you scream like a little girl too (which turns out to also be hilarious in hindsight)
It’s a very sad affair when you do not have your camera in reach and you run into an amazing six-spotted fishing spider FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME in your life. I mean, there are dreams of college graduation and sports cars, but the first six-spotted fishing spider and he’s actively fishing, but no camera… *cry*
Cheers!
Signature: NatureGirl

Katydid

Katydid

Dear NatureGirl,
Thanks so much for your wonderfully enthusiastic submission.  We believe your Katydid may be a Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid,
Scudderia furcata, which is pictured on BugGuide, but we are not certain.  Your Orbweaver is a Long-Jawed Orbweaver in the genus Tetragnatha.  According to BugGuide:  “These spiders spin circular (orb) webs, mostly in the horizontal plane, often just inches above the surface of water where they can intercept emerging insects like midges, mayflies, and stoneflies” and “Larger species near water, especially along the shores of rivers and streams. Smaller species in fields and meadows.”  Yes, large Argiopes are scary looking, but perfectly harmless, though large individuals might bite if carelessly handled.  We are sorry to hear about missing getting an image of a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, so we are linking to some marvelous images from our archives.

Longjawed Orbweaver

Longjawed Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hopper insect ID
Location: Rio Rancho, NM
September 26, 2016 7:36 pm
Hi,
I saw this on our wall outside today. I thought it was a grasshopper, but saw a pic online that resembled it…they said it was a katydid, but the web page was from Australia. Can you id this please? Thank you.
Signature: Paul Diamond

Two-Lined Shieldback

Two-Lined Shieldback

Dear Paul,
This is a Katydid known as a Two-Lined Shieldback,
 Eremopedes bilineatus, based on this BugGuide image, but according to BugGuide:  “16 spp. in 2 subgenera, all in our area,” though it is the only one of the five species pictured on BugGuide that looks similar.  We have no idea what the other 11 species in the genus look like.  This might need the input of a Katydid expert, so we will attempt to contact Piotr Naskrecki regarding its identity. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination