Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Attack on the Father-In-Law
Location: Adel, Iowa
October 7, 2012 10:01 pm
Greetings, Bugman!
Jeanie Cunningham has sent me your way after she saw a picture I took of an unidentified critter that landed on my father-in-law’s face. It was July in the middle of Iowa, and the man-eater was really more interested in other non-carnivorous meals. Any ideas? Many thanks for trying!!
Signature: David the Ukester

Immature Greater Angle-Wing Katydid

Dear David the Ukester,
We really miss Jeanie since she move away from our Mount Washington neighborhood to Palm Springs.  Your insect is an immature Katydid, most likely a Greater Angle-Wing Katydid,
Microcentrum rhombifolium.  You may compare your individual to this photograph from Bugguide.  Katydids are among the music makers of the insect class.

By jove, I think you’ve got it!!  Thank you so much!  I have always heard of katydids, but never knew what one looked like.  Now I do!  Thanks again, and I’ll let Jeanie know that her suggestion worked.
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Monster
Location: Phoenix, AZ
September 16, 2012 1:23 am
Dear Bugman,
This guy (girl?) flew into my car as I was on my way out tonight. Needless to say, I was a bit late getting going by the time I got it out of the car and got pictures. It’s about two inches long. It’s not a very coordinated flyer. I live in Phoenix, AZ. This was mid-September, and about 9pm. What’s that bug???
Signature: Monica

Creosote Bush Katydid

Hi Monica,
This is a Creosote Bush Katydid,
Insara covilleae, a desert species found in the southwest.  You can find additional information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mexican bug!
Location: Yucatán, Mexico
August 28, 2012 2:38 pm
Hello, I was wondering if you could identify this insect my friends found in their hotel while on honeymoon in Yucatán, Mexico. They said the stinger visible on its end was about an inch long so I suppose it was 4-5 inches in total. Any light shed on its identity would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Signature: Jo

Shieldback Katydid

Dear Jo,
This poor creature is a Shieldback Katydid, and for some reason, she has lost most of her long antennae, sensory organs that characterize her suborder, Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthopterans.  What your friend has mistaken for a stinger is actually an ovipositor, an organ associated with egg laying.  We will see if we can get assistance from Piotr Naskrecki, a Katydid expert, with regards to her species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper-looking insect
Location: Colorado
August 15, 2012 6:45 pm
Hi!
I was hiking up Mt Elbert, in Colorado, this morning (8/15/12) and came across this bug. We were about 1/2 a mile from the summit (about 14k feet). It was fairly large. I obnoxiously chased it with my camera and only slightly annoyed it (it moved just a little out of my way).
Sorry I didn’t get in a good perspective for this bug’s size.
Signature: Paige

Mormon Cricket

Hi Paige,
This large, flightless Katydid is commonly called a Mormon Cricket.  When conditions are right, they can appear in great numbers, eating most things in their path.  Legend has it that when the Mormons first settled in Utah, a swarm of Mormon Crickets descended upon the crops threatening to wipe out the harvest.  A flock of seagulls appeared and devoured the Mormon Crickets, saving the crops.  Mormon Crickets are generally depicted as being black, but green individuals are not uncommon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown katiedid/grasshopper
Location: Pastaza, Ecuador
August 12, 2012 12:25 am
I took these pictures last October in the Amazon in Ecuador and I have had no luck figuring out what it is.
Signature: bjkalma

Lichen Katydid

Dear bjkalma,
It seems that worldwide, Katydids have a knack for being able to mimic their natural surroundings, however many exotic species seem otherworldly when they are photographed against more neutral backgrounds that cause them to stand out as opposed to blending in.  We did a web search of Katydids in Ecuador and quickly found this link to Gail Shumway Photography that identifies this as a Lichen Katydid, 
Markia hystrix.  We then hoped for a more scientific website to corroborate that ID and we found a photo on Animals and Earth with the Lichen Katydid as well as the lichen it mimics.  An individual from Panama is also pictured on Project Noah.  Thank you for this fine addition to our archive.

Lichen Katydid

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Random bug in Colorado…
Location: Gunnison, CO
August 12, 2012 9:28 pm
Hey there we found this bug while doing some fishing near Gunnison Colorado wondering what it was. Wasn’t sure if it was alive so we snapped a pic and moved on leaving it be. Hope the picture helps.
Thanks!
Signature: J

Mormon Cricket

Dear J,
This appears to us to be a very well camouflaged Mormon Cricket.  Most Mormon Crickets pictured on the internet and in books are darker, almost black in color, but variations do occur.  The Sauntering Oregon blog has a nice photo of a Green Mormon Cricket and BugGuide has several images of Green Mormon Crickets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination