Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
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I call him Perry – what would you call him?
Location: Vancouver, BC
August 24, 2011 10:29 am
Hi Bugman,
This green bug showed up on my ceiling the other day, and returned again today (its late August). I live in a 3rd-floor apartment in Vancouver, BC.
I have never seen anything like him before – he has wings, but didn’t try to use them when I went to catch him in a glass, and then he happily clung to the side of that glass while I tried to shake him out the window. I think he looks sort of like a grasshopper, but without the giant back legs to help him hop!
Thanks!
Signature: Glenda

Drumming Katydid

Dear Glenda,
We have identified this Orthopteran as a male Drumming Katydid,
Meconema thalassinum, by matching it to a photo on BugGuide.  We were surprised to learn this on BugGuide:  “According to the Singing Insects of North Americs website, the subfamily of Meconematinae is represented in the US by only one species, M. thalassinum, which has been introduced from Europe.”

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Cricket?
Location: Portland, Oregon
August 15, 2011 3:12 am
Dear bugman,
I’m interested to know specifically what kind of bug this is that I found residing in my new apartment. If you know any additional information like what kind of plants he likes or hides out in, that would be cool too.
Signature: -Curious

Drumming Katydid

Dear Curious,
This is actually a Quite Calling Katydid known as the Drumming Katydid,
Meconema thalassinum, and you can tell she is a female because of her ovipositor.  See BugGuide for additional information.

Drumming Katydid

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What’s this bug/Cricket/Cicada?
Location: Collias, Gard, France
August 11, 2011 5:36 am
Please could you help identify the attached bug?
We photographed it last week in the Gard, in the South of France on a hot day (30C-ish). It was sitting amongst some long grass at the base of an olive tree and was making NO sound at all.
Signature: Steph

Bushcricket

Hi Steph,
This is a male Shieldback Katydid in the genus
Ephippiger, and they are commonly called Bushcrickets, but we are not certain if that is a translation from the French.

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Grasshopper
Location: North America, Minnesota
August 9, 2011 12:13 am
I am wondering what this lil critter is! Found him on my car about half way to my destination, he was on my windshield an I am glad he didn’t fly off so i could snap a pic!
Signature: Rye-Guy

Common Conehead

Dear Rye-Guy,
Your Katydid is known as a Common Conehead in the genus
Neocolocephalus, and BugGuide has this to say about its feeding habits:  “Adults feed mostly on seeds of grasses, sometimes sedges. Nymphs feed on grass flowers, developing seeds.”  BugGuide also notes that it may bite if handled, but it is worth mentioning that this is not a venomous species and it is most likely that the bite will not even draw blood.

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What is this bug?
Location: London Ontario
August 6, 2011 9:59 am
This was attracted to our back-porch light around midnight last night. I think it was eating other small bugs. I don’t think it’s a lacewing. It was about 2” in total length. Sort of looks like a grass hopper. It rubbed it’s 2 inner wings together every once in a while, making a chirping sound.
Signature: Joe

Treetop Bush Katydid

Dear Joe,
This is a Katydid, and they can be differentiated from Grasshoppers by their antennae.  Grasshoppers have much shorter antennae, and Katydids are classifies as Longhorned Orthopterans in the suborder Ensifera.  We believe this is a male Treetop Bush Katydid,
Scudderia fasciata, based on this particular image posted to BugGuide.

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What species of Anabrus?
Location: Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado
August 5, 2011 3:53 pm
I caught this specimen in 2005. Only knew it as a ”Mormon cricket.” However, I know it’s an Anabrus sp.. However, I find on bug guide that A. simplex is found on the E slope of Colorado. This specimen was caught in Dinosaur National Monument on my way to field work there.
I’m thinking it’s not A. simplex because of the sheer size (my thumb is about 2” long) and dark carapace.
Thanks!!
Signature: Fish Seal

Mormon Cricket, we presume

Dear Fish Seal,
We would not attempt to conclusively identify this Shieldbacked Katydid beyond the genus level of
Anabrus, however, if you did not express such specificity in your letter, we would have been perfectly comfortable identifying it as a Mormon Cricket, Anabrus simplex.  It is a nearly identical visual match to this individual, also a female from Colorado, that is posted to BugGuide.

Thank you.  I had checked BugGuide, but I did not see that photograph.  I would have to concur that it is indeed A. simplex.  Thank you so much for all you do!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination