Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper in Piedmont region Georgia.
Location: Piedmont Georgia
November 9, 2016 6:12 pm
Trying to identify this grasshopper. Here’s a link http://m.imgur.com/2wFb2rh it’s gorgeous, I just want to know what it is! Thanks!
Signature: Mariah Dalton

Red Headed Meadow Katydid

Red Headed Meadow Katydid

Dear Mariah,
This is not a Grasshopper, but rather a Katydid, and even more specifically a Greater Meadow Katydid in the genus Orchelimum.  We believe this is a Red Headed Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum erythrocephalum, based on this BugGuide image and the description on BugGuide that states:  “Coloration typically green with reddish highlights, including a (usually) bright red head in both sexes. Eyes light blue. Red head is (apparently?) distinctive in this genus, however some specimens do not show a bright red head.”  The sickle-shaped ovipositor at the tip of the abdomen indicates that this is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grasshoppers
Location: Madera Canyon, AZ
November 4, 2016 2:18 pm
Many different species of grasshopper in the multible biomes of this southeastern part of Arizona near the Sky Islands and in Madera Canyon. A mix of oak woodlands, succulents and pines in the upper region. I’ve tried to ID them online, but nothing looks quite what I photographed. One naturalist said one was a differential grasshopper, but again I didn’t see the resemblance.
Signature: Thank you, Leanne Grossman

Female Katydid

Female Mexican Bush Katydid

Dear Leanne,
Anyone who uses the term “biomes” in a request is worth corresponding with in our estimation.  While all of your submitted images depict members of the order Orthoptera which includes Grasshoppers, not all of your Orthopterans are Grasshoppers.  The green individual with the long antennae is a Katydid, and the antennae distinguish Longhorned Orthopterans from the suborder Ensifera from the Grasshoppers which are classified in the suborder Caelifera.  The upturned, sickle-like ovipositor identifies your Katydid as a female, and the shape of the ovipositor is often a factor in species identification.  Alas, we have not the necessary skills to identify your species without research, but we wanted to begin the posting nonetheless.  Since Katydids are categorized separately from Grasshoppers on our site, we will finish addressing this identification as well as your other images in the near future.

Update:  Hello again Leanne,
Based on this BugGuide image, we believe your female Katydid is a Mexican Bush Katydid,
Scudderia mexicana, and despite its name, its natural range includes both the Southwestern States and Mexico.  Insects have no respect for international borders.  The fun site Arizona:  Beetles Bugs Birds and more has a December 13, 2011 posting that includes an awesome image of a female from the genus using her ovipositor to create a repository for her eggs on their proper food plant.

Thank you again, Daniel. Best regards,
Leanne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Cricket in Seattle
Location: West Seattle in Washington State
November 5, 2016 9:26 am
Hello,
I saw this cricket looking insect the other day on my small fence gate. I’ve lived in this house for almost 30 years and have never seen anything like this in Seattle before. I tried to identify it via the web and it appears that it is a Southern Oak Bush Cricket. The problem is that everything says they are found in Europe or Britain. What could this guy be? Thanks in advance!
Signature: Curious in Seattle

Immature Female Drumming Katydid

Immature Female Drumming Katydid

Dear Curious in Seattle,
Based on this BugGuide image, we are very confident that this is an immature female Drumming Katydid,
Meconema thalassinum.  According to BugGuide:  “Southern New England and British Columbia. See also BugGuide range map for an indication of the expansion of the range into neighboring states.”  This is not a native species, because according to the Singing Insects of North America website:  “This subfamily is represented in the United States by a single species, Meconema thalassinum, introduced from Europe.”  Interestingly, Oak Bush Cricket is another acceptable common name, along with Sea-Green Katydid, for the Drumming Katydid, according to BugGuide.

Thank you so much Daniel. I really appreciate you getting back to me so soon. Thanks for identifying the bug for us. Very interesting.
Curious in Seattle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: crazy grasshopper in costa rica
Location: Costa Rica
October 30, 2016 7:20 pm
Hi,
Sorry for all the submissions tonight. My husband and I live in Costa Rica and are aspiring nature photographers who see a lot of weird bugs and insects, but I will try not to overwhelm you with my hundreds of cool shots 🙂 Our neighbor took this photo of a strange ghost jellyfish looking grasshopper, any idea what kind it is? Thanks
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Katydid

Lichen Katydid

Dear Kari,
This is not a Grasshopper.  It is a Katydid.  We located a matching image on SongStar, but alas, it is not identified.  It is identified as
Markia hystrix on Nature Images and it is called by the common name Lichen Katydid on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I am not sure what this is?
Location: Raleighvallen/ Voltzberg are located in the Central of the Suriname Nature Reserve. Suriname, South America
October 14, 2016 12:33 pm
Found it in July 2015 sitting on wood near the river.
Signature: Magdalena Bartsch

Katydid

Katydid

Dear Magdalena,
Thanks to Getty Images, we are pretty certain your male Katydid is in the genus
Paraphidnia.  Based on an image posted to Research Gate, it might be Paraphidnia rubricorpus.

Katydid

Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID Help
Location: Raleigh, NC area
October 15, 2016 3:23 pm
I found this bug at the end of September in the Raleigh, NC area. I thought it was a large grasshopper, but after further inspection I noticed the head was really different than any grasshopper I’ve ever seen. I came across your site trying to find out what it was. Any help would be great! Thank you.
Signature: Mitch

Slightly Musical Conehead, we believe

Slightly Musical Conehead, we believe

Dear Mitch,
This is one of the Coneheads in the genus
Neoconocephalus, possibly the Slightly Musical Conehead, Neoconocephalus exiliscanorus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Has the longest cone among U.S. conehead species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination