Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: crazy grasshopper in costa rica
Location: Costa Rica
October 30, 2016 7:20 pm
Hi,
Sorry for all the submissions tonight. My husband and I live in Costa Rica and are aspiring nature photographers who see a lot of weird bugs and insects, but I will try not to overwhelm you with my hundreds of cool shots 🙂 Our neighbor took this photo of a strange ghost jellyfish looking grasshopper, any idea what kind it is? Thanks
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Katydid

Lichen Katydid

Dear Kari,
This is not a Grasshopper.  It is a Katydid.  We located a matching image on SongStar, but alas, it is not identified.  It is identified as
Markia hystrix on Nature Images and it is called by the common name Lichen Katydid on iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I am not sure what this is?
Location: Raleighvallen/ Voltzberg are located in the Central of the Suriname Nature Reserve. Suriname, South America
October 14, 2016 12:33 pm
Found it in July 2015 sitting on wood near the river.
Signature: Magdalena Bartsch

Katydid

Katydid

Dear Magdalena,
Thanks to Getty Images, we are pretty certain your male Katydid is in the genus
Paraphidnia.  Based on an image posted to Research Gate, it might be Paraphidnia rubricorpus.

Katydid

Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID Help
Location: Raleigh, NC area
October 15, 2016 3:23 pm
I found this bug at the end of September in the Raleigh, NC area. I thought it was a large grasshopper, but after further inspection I noticed the head was really different than any grasshopper I’ve ever seen. I came across your site trying to find out what it was. Any help would be great! Thank you.
Signature: Mitch

Slightly Musical Conehead, we believe

Slightly Musical Conehead, we believe

Dear Mitch,
This is one of the Coneheads in the genus
Neoconocephalus, possibly the Slightly Musical Conehead, Neoconocephalus exiliscanorus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Has the longest cone among U.S. conehead species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Katydid?
Location: Japan
October 13, 2016 4:46 am
Found this bug on a bush in a field of tall grass in Osaka, Japan on Ocober 2. It was about 3-4 cm long. As soon as I snapped the picture, it jumped off into grass & hid.
Can you tell me what it is?
Signature: Karen

Katydid:  Gampsocleis buergeri

Katydid: Gampsocleis buergeri

Dear Karen,
We believe we have correctly identified your Katydid as a male
Gampsocleis buergeri on the Natural Japan site where it states:  “These huge katydids (bush-crickets) are everywhere at the moment. They sit perfectly camouflaged on leaves and then half jump, half crawl into the foliage making so much disturbance that it’s like a much larger animal is lurking there. Once you get used to spotting them before they disappear, it’s possible to sneak up and take photos.”  According to National Geographic Creative which has an image of a female of the species with her long ovipositor, this Katydid is called “Kirigirisu” in Japan.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Friendly Crickets?
Location: Northeast Georgia
October 8, 2016 9:44 am
Recently, I’ve been making a few Cricket friends, including Katydids every once in a while. My wife has been fascinated how they seem to love to land on me on our porch, and then even follow me inside and sit next to me at my desk. Friendly little buggers… I just calmly talk to them and even handle them when they show up. I even feed and give them water, which they love.
Attached is photo of my newest friend I made last night, landing on my leg and riding inside with me. So he is still here this morning, after he walked all over my office thoughout the night, I picked him up again and put him in the open window. He’s still not going anywhere. lol, drinking his water now.
So I wanted to ask what insight you may have for this behavior? I’ve heard they actually keep them as pets in China? Also, what kind of cricket is this anyway? (He’s the second one that has come to hang out with me)
Also, a katydid that wouldn’t leave my kitchen after I fed him last month, would actually sing to me when I walked in. I’m serious, was wonderful, and he was great.
Signature: Frog

American Shieldback

American Shieldback

Dear Frog,
This is a female American Shieldback,
Atlanticus americanus, a species of Katydid, and the swordlike ovipositor is the feature that identifies her as female.  We verified her identification on BugGuide and according to BugGuide, she is a:  “Predator and scavenger of other insects, but will also feed on live vegetation.”  Insects spend a great percentage of their lives seeking sustenance and water, and though we do not want to downplay your unique relationship with Katydids, when a hungry insect is presented with food, it will eat.  We suspect your own sensitivity to the creatures around you is more of a factor than any overt attraction to you directly, as an individual, by the Katydids.  Once we become aware of the subtle things around us, we notice them more.  We suspect you are more observant, and open-minded than the average person who might encounter a Katydid.

American Shieldback

American Shieldback

You are awesome, and thank you. 😉
In hopes that many more join this state of mind / being.
Your friend,
Frog

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle or katydid cousin?
Location: Oregon (foothills of Mt Hood)
October 8, 2016 3:40 pm
What is this? Saw it in a camp lodge east of Portland Oregon. Lots of evergreen trees around and some small meadows.
Signature: Mama B

Shieldbacked Katydid

Shieldbacked Katydid

Dear Mama B,
This is a Shieldbacked Katydid in the genus
Neduba, based on this image from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination