Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: assassin bug
Location: Carroll County, Maryland
July 1, 2017 9:49 am
green assassin bug with striped antennae. Can’t find it, even on the Maryland Biodiversity Project page.
Signature: Mary

Immature Bush Katydid

Dear Mary,
This is NOT an Assassin Bug.  It is a Bush Katydid nymph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket
Location: Lesbos
June 28, 2017 1:15 pm
Daniel,
You were kind enough to identify some insects on Lesbos for me some time ago. I have now been back to Lesbos and have s few more for you. I hope to use these in a talk I have been asked to do for an RSPB group and would appreciate your help as I have been unable to identify them on line,
Regards
Signature: William Smiton

Bush Cricket

Dear William,
This is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and the common name Bush Cricket is frequently used in Europe.  The individual in your image is a male, and the wings are either not fully developed or they do not permit a mature individual to fly.  We are having a bit of difficulty identifying the species.  This individual on Getty Images looks similar, but it is only identified to the family, and it is a female as evidenced by her ovipositor.  There is an endemic species of Bush Cricket on Lesbos,
Poecilimon mytelensis, and it is pictured on Pbase, but it looks like a different species to us, but again, it is a female.  The male pictured on Minden Pictures does not have wings, so we suspect your individual is a different species, but we are having problems finding images of Bush Crickets on Lesbos other than Poecilimon mytelensis that are identified to the species level.  This FlickR image looks close, but again, no species name.  So, this is a Bush Cricket in the family Tettigoniidae, but we do not believe it is the endemic Poecilimon mytelensis.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orthopteran? Coleoptera?
Location: Virginia coast, Chesapeake bay, U.S.
June 20, 2017 3:17 pm
Photo taken east coast U.S. near Chesapeake bay, virginia
Signature: Joe

Please disregard previous identification request — I found out the insect in question is a katydid, scudderia-genus nymph

Bush Katydid Nymph

Hi Joe,
Your image of a Bush Katydid nymph is just too cute to disregard, so we posted it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stumped on this one…
Location: Northern Illinois
June 6, 2017 8:36 am
Left my water bottle on the ground while I was doing some work outside, came back to find this on the lid. I’ve looked around but I can’t figure out what it is, any ideas?
Signature: Sara

Recently Hatched Katydid

Dear Sara,
This is a recently hatched Katydid, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  We are post-dating your submission to go live to our site later in the month when our editorial staff is away on holiday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this big Moroccan bug?
Location: Morocco
May 31, 2017 3:17 pm
Hi Bugman,
Can you help identify and tell me more about this bug? It was huge and looked like a grenade with legs!
Spotted in Morocco and the locals call it a Black Bettle.
Look forward to your opinion!
Thanks,
Signature: Pilot Pete

Bush Cricket

Dear Pilot Pete,
We found this old posting from our archives that Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki identified as being in the genus
Eugaster, but that is a black individual and your individual is much lighter.  Based on images posted to Orthoptera Species File, we believe your individual is Eugaster spinulosa.  There is some amusing information on Revolvy, including:  “It is known as the whistle cricket, because herdsmen would dry it and pull off its legs, in order to use the cricket as a whistle.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible bug larvae?
Location: Caldwell, Idaho
April 6, 2017 6:26 pm
We came across these little ovals on the branches of our little outside blueberry bush. They didn’t move and were difficult to pick off. They appear to be some sort of larvae, but we’re not sure.
Signature: Sara

Katydid Eggs

Dear Sara,
These are the eggs of a Katydid.  Though Katydids eat leaves, in our opinion, they do not do enough damage to be of concern.  Since adult Katydids are among nature’s most audible musicians, we enjoy having these generally green, Grasshopper-like insects in our garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination