Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid in glorious pink?
Geographic location of the bug:  Goa, India
Date: 01/11/2018
Time: 06:45 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this sitting on a gate in the foothills of the Western Ghats. 50mm long with 50mm antennae. Any idea?
How you want your letter signed:  Colin P

Katydid

Dear Colin,
We are posting your image of a Katydid, and we are contacting Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can assist in the identification of what we believe to be an immature individual. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Listroscelis or Arachnoscelis?
Geographic location of the bug:  La Cangreja National Park, Puriscal, San José, Costa Rica
Date: 01/09/2018
Time: 06:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Months ago I found this weird looking katydid. I know  it is from subfamily Listroscelidinae, but I’m confused about its genus. I think is a Listroscelis or an Arachnoscelis but can’t find out which the difference between them. Hope you can help me.
How you want your letter signed:  Dariel Sanabria

Male Katydid:  Arachnoscelis species

Dear Dariel,
Immature insects are often more difficult to identify than adults for several reasons.  First, they often look very different from adults, and secondly, adults are frequently more well documented than are immature stages.  We will send your image to Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a conclusive identification for you.

Piotr Naskrecki provides a correction and identification.
Hi Daniel,
This is indeed Arachnoscelis, an adult male. Hard to say which species without seeing a closeup of the abdominal apex.
Cheers,
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cricket identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Piet Retief, Mpumalanga,  South Africa
Date: 01/08/2018
Time: 08:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this insect on the grass under a large paperback acacia thorn tree. It is almost the same colour of the lichen on the tree ( see photograph). I thought it was a grasshopper but now think it is a cricket. It is small (2cm).
How you want your letter signed:  Lynn Volker

Lichen Mimicking Katydid

Dear Lynn,
Even though immature Katydids can often visually differ greatly from adult Katydids, and given that there are more images of identified adult Katydids on the World Wide Web than there are of frequently undocumented immature stages, and we acknowledge that though they share some visual similarities including looking like lichens, we do not believe your (probably) immature Katydid nymph to be the same species as this South African individual pictured on Photographs from South Africa.  We are going to attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he recognizes your comely specimen.

Piotr Naskrecki provides an identification.
Hi Daniel,
This is a nymph of Eurycorypha sp. (possibly E. varia).
Cheers,
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Ed. Note:  We located images attributed to the genus Eurycorypha on Africa Wild, but the adult looks nothing like this gorgeous nymph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Nicoya Peninsula
Date: 01/07/2018
Time: 12:00 PM EDT
Can you identify this bug?
I took these pictures a couple of days ago in a house near Santa Teresa.
It looks a bit like a Haemodiasma Tessellata but the body is flatter and the shape of the head looks different. It has very long, thin antennae, approx twice the length of the body, which are not fully visible in the pictures.
Thanks a lot!
How you want your letter signed:  Matteo

Katydid

Dear Matteo,
We agree that your individual does resemble a Moss Mimic Katydid,
Haemodiasma tessellata, and it also resembles the Panama Sylvan Katydid, Acanthodis curvidens.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a species identification.

Katydid

Piotr Naskrecki provides the identification.
Hi Daniel,
Happy New Year to you, too! This is Acanthodis curvidens. Haeodiasma tessellata has a stouter body and the strongly curved spines (“curvidens”) on the hind femur are a giveaway.
Cheers,
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Dear Daniel
Thanks a lot for your answer.
I am a total novice in entomology but since I moved to Costa Rica I am surrounded by all kinds of wildlife and I often bump into weird looking creatures.
So proud my guess was spot on! Hahaha!
Please forward my thanks to Piotr Naskrecki.
Cheers
Matteo
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Can anybody help me with the ID of this katydid nymph
Geographic location of the bug:  Jacó, Puntarenas, Costa Rica
Date: 12/12/2017
Time: 05:58 PM EDT
I’m trying to find the name of this little bug. It was around 3 cm long. I know katydids are hard to identify and it is even more difficult when they are nymphs, but this one had blue eyes and pronotum.  Hope you can help me.
How you want your letter signed:  Dariel Sanabria Q. / Artrópodos de Costa Rica

Blue-Eyed Katydid Nymph

Dear Daniel,
Your image of this blue-eyed Katydid nymph is beautiful.  Nymphs can be difficult to correctly identify.  We did not have any luck locating any similar looking nymphs on the internet.  We will write to Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide an identification.

Thank you! Hope Piotr can find its ID.
Greetings!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid or something else?
Geographic location of the bug:  Pelham, Ontario
Date: 11/19/2017
Time: 06:44 AM EDT
Hi there,
I photographed what I think is an immature katydid, although I’m not sure if it might be something else. It was very small and transparent – you can see what I believe is its digestive system or something else right through the exoskeleton. I just lucked out with the lighting. Anyway would love to know if you can verify, and I also thought you might like this photo.
How you want your letter signed:  Brad

Immature Meadow Katydid

Dear Brad,
Considering your location, it is very late in the season to get an image of an immature Katydid.  We believe this is an immature Meadow Katydid like the one pictured on BugGuide.

Hi Daniel,
I’m sorry, I should have stated that the picture was taken a few months ago! I was going through my pictures and wanted to choose another cover photo for my Facebook profile and it struck me that I loved that picture and wasn’t exactly sure what it was.
Thank you for the identification!  I love your work.
Have a great week 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination